Matthew 12:40

rstrats

Active member
With another new year beginning, maybe there will be someone new looking in who knows of examples as requested in the OP and clarified in further posts. And again, remember that the purpose of this topic is not to discuss how long the Messiah was in the heart of the earth. As stated, there are other topics that do that.
 

rstrats

Active member
The Messiah said that 3 night times would be involved with His time in the "heart of the earth". However, there are those who believe that the Messiah died on the 6th day of the week and who think that the "heart of the earth" is referring to the tomb or at the earliest to the time between the leaving of His spirit from His body and His resurrection on the 1st day of the week. But this belief allows for only 2 night times to be involved. To reconcile this discrepancy some say that the Messiah was using common Jewish idiomatic language. I am simply asking for examples to support that assertion; i.e., instances where a daytime or a night time was forecast to be involved with an event when no part of the daytime or no part of the night time could have occurred.

This topic is essentially directed to those folks who say that it was common at the time to say that a daytime or a night time would be involved with an event when no part of the daytime or no part of the night time could have taken place. A 6th day crucifixion/first day resurrection would be one example. I'm simply looking for other examples to support it's commonality.
 

beameup

New member
Someone new looking in may know of examples.
That week there was a mid-week Passover Sabbath and a regular Sabbath.
He was in the tomb by the beginning of Passover (at sunset). Jewish days started at sunset.

 

rstrats

Active member
beameup,
re: "That week there was a mid-week Passover Sabbath and a regular Sabbath."

That's an issue for a different topic. Perhaps you could start one.
 

oatmeal

Well-known member
That week there was a mid-week Passover Sabbath and a regular Sabbath.
He was in the tomb by the beginning of Passover (at sunset). Jewish days started at sunset.


The poster is wonderfully accurate.

I was wondering if anyone was going to catch on to those truths.

Nice to see someone has.

If you want to get into much greater depth of those truths, you might find a copy of "Jesus Christ our Passover" by Victor Paul Wierwille.
 

beameup

New member
beameup,
re: "That week there was a mid-week Passover Sabbath and a regular Sabbath."

That's an issue for a different topic. Perhaps you could start one.

The early Catholic Church got most everything wrong. Emperor Constantine's mother was sent out to find all the "holy sites" in and around Jerusalem. She offered rewards for artifacts. Unfortunately, the Protestants continued with all of the erroneous dates and places established by Catholicism.
 

rstrats

Active member
beameup,
re: "The early Catholic Church got most everything wrong.That week there was a mid-week Passover Sabbath and a regular Sabbath."

That's also an issue for a different topic.
 

beameup

New member
beameup,
re: "The early Catholic Church got most everything wrong.That week there was a mid-week Passover Sabbath and a regular Sabbath."

That's also an issue for a different topic.

By the 2nd century, Christianity had totally separated from Judaism, and soon all things concerning Judaism was lost. So, by the 4th century formation of the Holy Roman Church, there remained no knowledge of Judaism and anti-Semitism was established in the RCC. Thus, they knew nothing of the last week of Jesus ministry and nothing of the Jewish calendar and nothing of the Feasts associated with that week.
Three days and three nights equal 72 hours. Jonah was in the big fish for 72 hours... no more, no less.
 

beameup

New member
beameup,

And again, your post concerns issues for a different topic.

I don't think you will find anything relating to a partial day being equivalent to a full day. That conjecture was developed to attempt to make a Friday crucifixion end up satisfying the required "three days". It has no basis in Judaism.
 

rstrats

Active member
beameup,
re: "I don't think you will find anything relating to a partial day being equivalent to a full day."

That's not a problem because that is not what I am asking.
 

jamie

New member
LIFETIME MEMBER
I don't think you will find anything relating to a partial day being equivalent to a full day.

I'll help you.

"In Jewish communal life part of a day is at times reckoned as one day; e.g., the day of the funeral, even when the latter takes place late in the afternoon, is counted as the first of the seven days of mourning; a short time in the morning of the seventh day is counted as the seventh day;

circumcision takes place on the eighth day, even though of the first day only a few minutes remained after the birth of the child, these being counted as one day.

Again, a man who hears of a vow made by his wife or his daughter, and desires to cancel the vow, must do so on the same day on which he hears of it, as otherwise the protest has no effect; even if the hearing takes place a little time before night, the annulment must be done within that little time."

http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5007-day

Three instances: 1) day of funeral, 2) day of circumcision, 3) day of a woman' vow.
 
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