Are you a Libertarian?

genuineoriginal

New member
My results:

You are 45% Libertarian, which makes you a Soft-core Libertarian.

Your basic political view is probably more libertarian than anything else, but you nevertheless hold clear reservations about central parts of the libertarian agenda. You understand the libertarian rationales and see where they are coming from, but you still find some of their policy recommendations to be too harsh, too anarchistic, or too extreme for the overall good of society. It is people like you who add a human face (and a bleeding heart) to an ideology that is otherwise perceived as cynical.

 

The Berean

Well-known member
My results:

Libertarian Test

You are 39% Libertarian, which makes you a Libertarian Fellow-Traveler.

Though you are probably *not* a libertarian in your basic political outlook, you are still able to find some common ground with the libertarian cause when it comes to social or economic freedoms (or possibly both). Your political roadmap for society most likely shares part of its route with the libertarians, but your ultimate political goal is probably different from the libertarian one.
 

drbrumley

Well-known member
Good thread...I suspect most are in 30 to 50 range..

I will take it when I get the time..but I'm sure I'm way above 50.
 

drbrumley

Well-known member
My results:

Libertarian Test

You are 39% Libertarian, which makes you a Libertarian Fellow-Traveler.

Though you are probably *not* a libertarian in your basic political outlook, you are still able to find some common ground with the libertarian cause when it comes to social or economic freedoms (or possibly both). Your political roadmap for society most likely shares part of its route with the libertarians, but your ultimate political goal is probably different from the libertarian one.

Curious, what's your basic political outlook?
 

genuineoriginal

New member
Hey, that's cool...I welcome your input as well.

So what about Constitutional Conservatism that attracted you to it?
There are many irrational policies and attitudes destroying our modern American society.
The principles behind the Constitution are much more rational as are most of the Judeo-Christian beliefs that were in practice in the 1700s.
My "Libertarianism" comes mostly from my belief in holding people responsible for their actions and getting rid of "Nanny State" mentality.
I am also opposed to corporations and LLCs (and labor unions) and am a strong believer in small businesses run by a sole proprietor or partnership who can choose who they will and will not do business with based on their own religious and political beliefs.
 

JudgeRightly

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You are 33% Libertarian, which makes you a Libertarian Fellow-Traveler.
result icon
Though you are probably *not* a libertarian in your basic political outlook, you are still able to find some common ground with the libertarian cause when it comes to social or economic freedoms (or possibly both). Your political roadmap for society most likely shares part of its route with the libertarians, but your ultimate political goal is probably different from the libertarian one.



That's mine, but it should probably be a lot lower considering many of the questions could have been divided up, as they contained things I disagree with and other things I agree with, or the questions were assuming other things that render the question useless from my worldview.

And there was at least one question that I had no idea what it was talking about...

For all of those, my answer was neutral or partly negative or partly positive.

:idunno:
 

annabenedetti

Well-known member
You are 0% Libertarian, which makes you Not Libertarian.

In your case it is safe to say that you are *not* a libertarian. Whether because you prefer a greater degree of social discipline or economic regulation (or possibly both), you probably tend to find large swatches of the libertarian program to be far-fetched, extremist, and possibly even downright repulsive. If you are not the argumentative type, you had best stay clear of libertarians - they have a reputation for being insufferable in an argument.
 

drbrumley

Well-known member
You are 0% Libertarian, which makes you Not Libertarian.

[FONT=&]In your case it is safe to say that you are *not* a libertarian. Whether because you prefer a greater degree of social discipline or economic regulation (or possibly both), you probably tend to find large swatches of the libertarian program to be far-fetched, extremist, and possibly even downright repulsive. If you are not the argumentative type, you had best stay clear of libertarians - they have a reputation for being insufferable in an argument.[/FONT]

:rotfl:
 

drbrumley

Well-known member
As suspected....96%


Watch out, we've got a (blank) over here. A hardcore libertarian, to be exact. In your case it would be patently wrong not to classify you as a libertarian as you are in complete agreement with almost all of the libertarian positions, save for a few pet peeves. Perhaps you are one of those eccentric libertarians who have a soft spot for the trappings of hereditary aristocracy and monarchy. Perhaps you have a personal religious faith to which you assign priority over more worldly matters, or perhaps it's something else altogether. In any event, though you nurture a few pet peeves, you really are an ardent libertarian. You probably use socialist as a swear word, and you strive to banish the influence of statist scum on your life. While you are not quite 100% libertarian, you truly are hardcore.

 

drbrumley

Well-known member

You are 33% Libertarian, which makes you a Libertarian Fellow-Traveler.
result icon
Though you are probably *not* a libertarian in your basic political outlook, you are still able to find some common ground with the libertarian cause when it comes to social or economic freedoms (or possibly both). Your political roadmap for society most likely shares part of its route with the libertarians, but your ultimate political goal is probably different from the libertarian one.



That's mine, but it should probably be a lot lower considering many of the questions could have been divided up, as they contained things I disagree with and other things I agree with, or the questions were assuming other things that render the question useless from my worldview.

And there was at least one question that I had no idea what it was talking about...

For all of those, my answer was neutral or partly negative or partly positive.

:idunno:

Im in line with that about the test...
 

Idolater

"Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan..."
My results:

You are 45% Libertarian, which makes you a Soft-core Libertarian.

Your basic political view is probably more libertarian than anything else, but you nevertheless hold clear reservations about central parts of the libertarian agenda. You understand the libertarian rationales and see where they are coming from, but you still find some of their policy recommendations to be too harsh, too anarchistic, or too extreme for the overall good of society. It is people like you who add a human face (and a bleeding heart) to an ideology that is otherwise perceived as cynical.

Libertarian Test
You are 18% Libertarian, which makes you Not Libertarian.
result icon

In your case it is safe to say that you are *not* a libertarian. Whether because you prefer a greater degree of social discipline or economic regulation (or possibly both), you probably tend to find large swatches of the libertarian program to be far-fetched, extremist, and possibly even downright repulsive. If you are not the argumentative type, you had best stay clear of libertarians - they have a reputation for being insufferable in an argument.
 

The Berean

Well-known member
Curious, what's your basic political outlook?

I thought I would score higher. LOL. My political outlook is constantly evolving. In my 20's I voted Democrat. In In my 30's I voted Republican. But as I neared my 40's I came to realize that both major parties are cesspools of political corruption and greed. And both parties have an unquenchable thirst for power and control. They are enemies of freedom. I generally favor smaller government and political freedom for all. I believe America has strayed far from it's constitutional roots. I favor less regulation in commerce and business. Every person should be free to run a business with minimal government interference. But there is a tight rope to be walked here. When huge corporations begin to control too much of the commerce and they begin to engage in monopolistic practices, have increasingly influence in the government, and begin to dictate how we should live then they are also enemies of freedom.

I find it hilarious how the Republican and Democrats point fingers at each other. The Democrats have embraced insane positions like identity politics, feminism, unbridled support of homosexuality, and high taxes. The GOP is no better with their "racist" rhetoric. They really don't believe this "racist" stuff but they use it to get votes. I don't like Trump but I don't froth at the moth with hatred towards him either. I do not believe he is a "racist". Certainly, he is an elitist and class-ist but most super rich people are in my experience. The GOP also likes to start expensive foreign wars with no real purpose in winning. They love to spend tons of money but as long as they don't spend it on things like "entitlement programs" they pat themselves on the back as claim they are "fiscal conservatives".
 

The Berean

Well-known member
There are many irrational policies and attitudes destroying our modern American society.
The principles behind the Constitution are much more rational as are most of the Judeo-Christian beliefs that were in practice in the 1700s.
My "Libertarianism" comes mostly from my belief in holding people responsible for their actions and getting rid of "Nanny State" mentality.
I am also opposed to corporations and LLCs (and labor unions) and am a strong believer in small businesses run by a sole proprietor or partnership who can choose who they will and will not do business with based on their own religious and political beliefs.
I think I can agree with this in theory. I generally distrust large multinational corporations. But I am not so sure how this would work in practice. We live in an increasingly technological society. And creating all this modern technology requires a large number of people to make it happen. if all major corporations were abolished do you thing small sole proprietorship could organize to conceptualize, design, plan, and manufacture a huge fleet of, say, commercial airliners? Boeing Aircraft has a HUGE workforce that work together to build even one aircraft. Even then Boeing has an army of vendors that produce goods and services in support of Boeing. Also, if large corporations didn't exist who would buy there $150,000,000 aircraft? Just wanted to get your thoughts on this,
 

genuineoriginal

New member
You are 0% Libertarian, which makes you Not Libertarian.

[FONT=&]In your case it is safe to say that you are *not* a libertarian. Whether because you prefer a greater degree of social discipline or economic regulation (or possibly both), you probably tend to find large swatches of the libertarian program to be far-fetched, extremist, and possibly even downright repulsive. If you are not the argumentative type, you had best stay clear of libertarians - they have a reputation for being insufferable in an argument.[/FONT]
With a score like that, I wonder how you would do on the Fascism Test

Here are my results:

Fascism Test

You are 36% Fascist, which makes you a Fascist Fellow-Traveler.

In your case, it would appear that your political outlook shares more than a few of the core doctrines of fascism. Since fascism is really a mix of communism, socialism, conservatism, and liberalism, with a few innovations of its own thrown in, it is scarcely surprising that most people's political outlook will have quite a few similarities with the doctrines of fascism. Even after adjusting for these parameters, however, it would seem that the commonalities between your political outlook and fascism are not merely incidental, but arise from certain overall themes, concerns, and solutions which your personal outlook has in common with fascism. While you are most likely *not* a fascist, the overlap between your preferred society and that of fascism is simply too significant to be pure chance. In all likelihood, you are what one might call a 'Fascist Fellow Traveler': Someone who sees value in some of the immediate societal changes that fascism would bring about, but *not* someone who is an actual fascist. Your ultimate political goal lies elsewhere.

 
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genuineoriginal

New member
I think I can agree with this in theory. I generally distrust large multinational corporations. But I am not so sure how this would work in practice. We live in an increasingly technological society. And creating all this modern technology requires a large number of people to make it happen. if all major corporations were abolished do you thing small sole proprietorship could organize to conceptualize, design, plan, and manufacture a huge fleet of, say, commercial airliners? Boeing Aircraft has a HUGE workforce that work together to build even one aircraft. Even then Boeing has an army of vendors that produce goods and services in support of Boeing. Also, if large corporations didn't exist who would buy there $150,000,000 aircraft? Just wanted to get your thoughts on this,
It does not appear to be possible to get back to sensible laws concerning corporations, but at one time we had sensible laws.


FIGHTING CORPORATE POWER SINCE 1776

In 1833, Andrew Jackson shut down the Second Bank of the United States, a private entity with authority over public finance much like today’s Federal Reserve. Throughout the nineteenth century, most states had laws that limited corporations to a specific purpose, such as building a certain bridge, canal or toll-road, and prevented them from expanding beyond it. According to Hartmann:

  • After it had completed its assigned task, a corporate charter would expire and the company would be dissolved. Corporate charters were not given, as they are today, “in perpetuity.”
  • The state could revoke a corporation’s charter if it either exceeded or did not fulfill its stated purpose or if it misbehaved.
  • To keep them out of politics, corporations were prohibited from making any political contributions, directly or indirectly through other groups.
  • To prevent them from extending their economic power inappropriately, corporations could only own real estate necessary to complete their stated business and were prohibited from owning shares in other companies.

 
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