Which do you hear?

Town Heretic

Out of Order
Hall of Fame
I'm also wondering if Southerners might not have an advantage in hearing the original information package and not being misled by higher frequencies given that unlike our cousins to the north we have to regularly unpack fairly muddy speech patterns and accents.
 

quip

BANNED
Banned
I'm also wondering if Southerners might not have an advantage in hearing the original information package and not being misled by higher frequencies given that unlike our cousins to the north we have to regularly unpack fairly muddy speech patterns and accents.

Yes, but at least your grits are to die for.:plain:
 

quip

BANNED
Banned
I just meditated with this on a loop recording. You can switch between the two names if you calm the mind.
'Yanny' has a nasally sound while 'Laurel' a deep resonate one.
 

Arthur Brain

Well-known member
Same here.

A couple days ago it was clearly Yanny, and then I listened again just now expecting to hear Yanny again but it was definitely Laurel. :chuckle:

Okay, I've just tried this again, on loop, rewinding randomly and it still so blatantly starts and begins with an 'l' to me each time. I don't get how "Yanny" can even be heard on this. "Yanny" would effectively end with an "E" sound.

Bemusing stuff.
 

annabenedetti

Well-known member
Okay, I've just tried this again, on loop, rewinding randomly and it still so blatantly starts and begins with an 'l' to me each time. I don't get how "Yanny" can even be heard on this. "Yanny" would effectively end with an "E" sound.

Bemusing stuff.


I realized the first time I'd listened on my phone so I went back to the phone and it was Yanny. On the laptop, it's Laurel. :liberals:

Must have something to do with frequencies, device speakers, and our auditory system? All those are outside my knowledge base.
 

Arthur Brain

Well-known member
I realized the first time I'd listened on my phone so I went back to the phone and it was Yanny. On the laptop, it's Laurel. :liberals:

Must have something to do with frequencies, device speakers, and our auditory system? All those are outside my knowledge base.

Yes, it's entirely to do with all of those and what a load of blackberries...or should I say, souffle? They sound one and the same when put in a mixer...

:liberals:
 

quip

BANNED
Banned
I realized the first time I'd listened on my phone so I went back to the phone and it was Yanny. On the laptop, it's Laurel. :liberals:

Must have something to do with frequencies, device speakers, and our auditory system? All those are outside my knowledge base.

It's all in the mind of the perceiver. It says Yanny if you expect it to....says Laurel for the same reason.

Listen to the loop until the name becomes simple noise, like saying a word over and over until it loses its conceptual meaning. Then repeat to yourself the opposite name you initially heard, in its place each time, rythmically..until the name suddenly changes, seeminly out of the blue.

Don't try too hard, relax yet be insistent. It may take a few minutes.
 
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