Homeschooled and proud of it!

always_learning

New member
I was homeschooled through my entire school years, and I thank God for it! My senior year I worked as a security guard at a local middle school... and went home and thanked my parents for not putting me through that!

Thanks to homeschooling I don't "finish" being educated, because learning is my life! I was self-taught since the beginning of high school, thanks to my mother using my elementary years to give me an intense love for learning.

Anyone else homeschooled/homeschooling? Let's hear your experience!
 

kmoney

New member
I started out in public schools and then did most of it in private schools. I wish my parents would have homeschooled me because I totally hate to learn now. :(
 

csuguy

New member
Because the public school system does a better job of it? :idunno:

The public school system doesn't teach religion (Evolution aside). So many Christians I know/have known that were raised in the church and were homeschooled or put in a private school know the doctrine of the church - but not how to support it. They have never considered an opposing view.
 

assuranceagent

New member
The public school system doesn't teach religion (Evolution aside). So many Christians I know/have known that were raised in the church and were homeschooled or put in a private school know the doctrine of the church - but not how to support it. They have never considered an opposing view.

So it would seem to me that the flaw was more in the approach their parents' took than in homeschooling in general...

When it's done right, the benefits of homeschooling can and often do far outweigh those of the public school system. I'm not saying it's for everyone, but your generalities seem to throw the proverbial baby out with the proverbial bath water.

And if secular humanism doesn't have all the earmarks of religion, then I'm an elephant on a trampoline...



:plain:


What?
 

always_learning

New member
i probably should start this in a new thread... i can't resist a good argument :)

The public school system doesn't teach religion (Evolution aside). So many Christians I know/have known that were raised in the church and were homeschooled or put in a private school know the doctrine of the church - but not how to support it. They have never considered an opposing view.

Doesn't (claim to) teach religion? Correct. Doesn't teach a worldview? Wrong. Children in modern public schools learn that homosexuality, premarital sex, and drugs are fun and cool, that authority is something to be feared and despised, that cutting yourself is a good way of relieving emotions, that adults are here to keep them happy until they turn 18, but are not supposed to meddle in what they do... they learn this all from their fellow students, who vastly outnumber the staff and are respected peers. Who would listen to an old man who's bald and boring over the "cool" kids?

Everything I listed above I dealt with personally in one school year as a security guard... there is a lot more that I haven't listed.
 

csuguy

New member
i probably should start this in a new thread... i can't resist a good argument :)



Doesn't (claim to) teach religion? Correct. Doesn't teach a worldview? Wrong. Children in modern public schools learn that homosexuality, premarital sex, and drugs are fun and cool, that authority is something to be feared and despised, that cutting yourself is a good way of relieving emotions, that adults are here to keep them happy until they turn 18, but are not supposed to meddle in what they do... they learn this all from their fellow students, who vastly outnumber the staff and are respected peers. Who would listen to an old man who's bald and boring over the "cool" kids?

Everything I listed above I dealt with personally in one school year as a security guard... there is a lot more that I haven't listed.

When I was in elementary and high school (just a few years ago actually) they didn't teach that stuff. They don't teach that drugs are cool and fun nor do they promote cutting yourself - those are the kids going to the school that do that, there is a difference. And just so you know - I didn't give a flying elephant on a trampoline what the "cool" kids thought. Quite frankly - I didn't like them. I also didn't care what my good friends thought - I did what I thought was right. This comes down to good parenting.

Personally - with how the schools have changed and will continue to change, I would probably now keep my kids (if I have any) at a private school throughout elementary school and then send them to public high school. High school most certainly can be rough - but you shouldn't shelter your kids completely.
 

always_learning

New member
They don't teach that drugs are cool and fun nor do they promote cutting yourself - those are the kids going to the school that do that, there is a difference.

Exactly... as I pointed out in my post. :) Unlike you, many of the kids in school DO care about who's cool, and turn to them for help and acceptance... which can be disastrous.


This comes down to good parenting.

Again, I agree with you. I merely believe that good parenting can be achieved much better if your children are at home, being parented to (i think i just invented a word :) )

High school most certainly can be rough - but you shouldn't shelter your kids completely.

And once again, I agree with your point, but not your method :) we could get along well!

It seems to me that there are better ways of "unsheltering" your kids than sending them to high school... but i suppose for this discussion I should start another thread
 

csuguy

New member
Exactly... as I pointed out in my post. :) Unlike you, many of the kids in school DO care about who's cool, and turn to them for help and acceptance... which can be disastrous.

True - but I believe good parenting can solve this. And perhaps during the early years they should be sheltered, but too much sheltering harms the child.

Again, I agree with you. I merely believe that good parenting can be achieved much better if your children are at home, being parented to (i think i just invented a word :) )

Part of growing up is getting out of the house and learning to deal with things on your own. Better in highschool than in college - when you don't go home to your parents everyday.

And once again, I agree with your point, but not your method :) we could get along well!

It seems to me that there are better ways of "unsheltering" your kids than sending them to high school... but i suppose for this discussion I should start another thread

Lol, we probably could. I think highschool is a good place to be unsheltered. Depending upon the highschool of course - I'm not suggesting one of those highschools where they have metal detectors at the front door. But high school is a place to be exposed to a lot of different view points and life styles. And it's not enough to simply be exposed - they have to learn to deal with it themselves, to think for themselves.
 

Prisca

Pain Killer
I went to public school from kindergarten through my senior year of college. My kids started out in public school, but fortunately we took them out before they reached junior high. Not only did we avoid one of the worst school shootings in history (my oldest would have been at Columbine) but my kids are some of the most mature and level headed people I know.

While I was in public school, I was exposed to all manner of inappropriate behavior. I was ridiculed and shunned because I chose not to engage in drug use. There were times when I felt so lonely, I actually considered suicide. I would never wish these things on my children.

My youngest is now 17. He's played hockey, he goes to a youth group, he traveled to Mexico as a missionary, he's the drummer in a band and he has been employed since he was 15. My three daughters are now teachers at a local tutoring center. We are so proud of all of them! Not only are they a joy to us, but they are dearly loved by aunts, uncles, grandparents and neighbors.

I hope that all parents have the chance to experience homeschooling their children!
 

always_learning

New member
My youngest is now 17. He's played hockey, he goes to a youth group, he traveled to Mexico as a missionary, he's the drummer in a band and he has been employed since he was 15. My three daughters are now teachers at a local tutoring center. We are so proud of all of them! Not only are they a joy to us, but they are dearly loved by aunts, uncles, grandparents and neighbors.

I hope that all parents have the chance to experience homeschooling their children!

This is what I have observed time and time again with homeschooled students: they learn how to deal with life at an early age... my younger brother is turning 17 tomorrow, he's been working almost full-time for a year and a half in construction and knows more than most adults in the trade. He has moved through 4 different employers, each one offering him more responsibility and of course, more money.
I don't see a whole lot of people like him or Prisca's children coming out of public school...
 

ebenz47037

Proverbs 31:10
My daughter started out in a Christian school for kindergarten and first grade. Then, because of the rise in tuition, we put her in public school. That lasted all of three weeks! Her teacher would complain that she was too far advanced in reading and math for her to teach. So, I suggested that they put her in the third grade. Her teacher said, "We can't do that! It will make the other children jealous." Then, she told me that I was a bad mother because I "forced her to read before she was in kindergarten." My daughter taught herself to read at two years old. When my husband and I pointed out that school is supposed to be for learning, no matter how far advanced a child may be, my daughter's teacher suggested that I homeschool her. With the exception of a semester right after my husband passed away and a semester when I taught Spanish in a Christian school, I homeschooled my daughter from second to twelfth grade. She completed high school last December. Now, she's trying to figure out what she wants to do with herself.
 

The Berean

Well-known member
My daughter started out in a Christian school for kindergarten and first grade. Then, because of the rise in tuition, we put her in public school. That lasted all of three weeks! Her teacher would complain that she was too far advanced in reading and math for her to teach. So, I suggested that they put her in the third grade. Her teacher said, "We can't do that! It will make the other children jealous." Then, she told me that I was a bad mother because I "forced her to read before she was in kindergarten." My daughter taught herself to read at two years old. When my husband and I pointed out that school is supposed to be for learning, no matter how far advanced a child may be, my daughter's teacher suggested that I homeschool her. With the exception of a semester right after my husband passed away and a semester when I taught Spanish in a Christian school, I homeschooled my daughter from second to twelfth grade. She completed high school last December. Now, she's trying to figure out what she wants to do with herself.

It's time to think about that engineering career again, Nori! :thumb:
 

Nathon Detroit

New member
We have 6 kids and homeschool all of them. 2 are now graduated.

We are blessed to have loving, friendly, respectful children. Not perfect of course but they are the joy of my life.
 
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