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Shooting at SC Church During Bible Study - Suspect still at large

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  • Shooting at SC Church During Bible Study - Suspect still at large

    *edit* Suspect has been Captured in North Carolina *edit*

    Last night During a Bible study a young man killed 9 people. His picture is below.


    "The vehicle he may be driving is a black Hyundai with vehicle tag LGF330. Anyone with information about his location call 1-800-CALL-FBI," the city said in a statement.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups, tweeted a photograph of the suspect sporting a jacket with what appears to be the flag for "white-rule Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe."





    News Story

    It happened at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in South Carolina, one of the oldest Historically Black Churches in the area. Sounds like the suspect may be a kind of white supremacist.

    -edit-
    So as not to focus completely on the shooter . . . here are the victims.


    Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 41: A state senator and the senior pastor of Emanuel, he was married to Jennifer Benjamin and the father of two children, Eliana and Malana. He was a 1995 graduate of Allen University and got his masters at the University of South Carolina in 1999. He served in the state Legislature starting in 2000; The Post and Courier says that today, black fabric was draped over Pinckney's Senate chamber seat.

    Cynthia Hurd, 54: According to the Charleston County Public Library, she was a 31-year employee who managed the John L. Dart Library for 21 years before heading the St. Andrews Regional Library. A statement said Hurd "dedicated her life to serving and improving the lives of others." The system closed its 16 branches Thursday to honor Hurd and the others who died in the shooting. County officials also say the St. Andrews library will be named for Hurd.

    Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, 45: A pastor at Emanuel, she was also a speech therapist and high school girls track and field coach, both positions at Goose Creek High School, according to her LinkedIn page. Her son, Chris Singleton, is a baseball player and student at Charleston Southern University. Coleman-Singleton also has two younger children, writes the Post and Courier.

    Tywanza Sanders, 26: He was a 2014 graduate in Business Administration from Allen University in Columbia. Lady June Cole, the interim president of Allen University, described him as "a quiet, well-known student who was committed to his education." Known as Ty, he had worked in sales at department stores such as Belk and Macy's.

    Ethel Lance, 70: She had attended Emanuel for most of her life and worked there as a custodian, as well. From 1968 to 2002, she worked as a custodian at Charleston's Gaillard Municipal Auditorium. The Post and Courier quotes a former colleague as saying, ""She was funny and a pleasure to be around. And she was a wonderful mother and grandmother."

    Susie Jackson, 87: Lance's cousin, she was a longtime church member.

    Depayne Middleton Doctor, 49: The mother of four sang in Emanuel's choir. She had previously directed a community development program in Charleston County. In December, she started a new job as an admissions coordinator at the Charleston campus of her alma mater, Southern Wesleyan University. SWU President Todd Voss said: "Always a warm and enthusiastic leader, DePayne truly believed in the mission of SWU to help students achieve their potential by connecting faith with learning. Our prayers go out to family and friends. This is a great loss for our students and the Charleston region."

    Rev. Daniel Simmons, 74: Simmons survived the initial attack but then died in a hospital operating room. He had previously been a pastor at another church in the Charleston area.

    Myra Thompson, 59: She was the wife of Rev. Anthony Thompson, the vicar of Holy Trinity Reformed Episcopal Church in Charleston.



    News Story.

    Ty Sanders




    Source
    Last edited by Alate_One; June 18th, 2015, 03:18 PM. Reason: Added victims
    “We do not believe in God because we need to explain this or that feature of the world. That is what science is for. We believe in God because we see something deeper in the world, something that transcends the scientific explanations.” - Karl Giberson Ph.D.



    - The science and faith of theistic evolution explained.


  • #2
    I hope they catch him, and quickly.
    He reveals deep and hidden things; he knows what lies in darkness, and light dwells with him.
    ~Daniel 2:22

    Comment


    • #3
      Could have been worse.. i.e. Timothy McVeigh.

      No doubt we will have another round of gun control discussions in the media over this.

      Comment


      • #4
        He is caught:

        Suspect in Charleston church rampage captured in North Carolina

        http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n...p=breakingnews
        He reveals deep and hidden things; he knows what lies in darkness, and light dwells with him.
        ~Daniel 2:22

        Comment


        • #5
          More information from the NYT story.


          Sylvia Johnson, a cousin of Mr. Pinckney, told NBC News that she had spoken with a survivor of the shooting who told her the gunman reloaded five times. The survivor, she said, told her that the gunman had entered the church and asked for the pastor. Then he sat next to Mr. Pinckney during the Bible study before opening fire.

          “I have to do it,” the gunman was quoted as saying. “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go.”



          This is being investigated as a hate crime.
          “We do not believe in God because we need to explain this or that feature of the world. That is what science is for. We believe in God because we see something deeper in the world, something that transcends the scientific explanations.” - Karl Giberson Ph.D.



          - The science and faith of theistic evolution explained.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Alate_One View Post
            More information from the NYT story.


            Sylvia Johnson, a cousin of Mr. Pinckney, told NBC News that she had spoken with a survivor of the shooting who told her the gunman reloaded five times. The survivor, she said, told her that the gunman had entered the church and asked for the pastor. Then he sat next to Mr. Pinckney during the Bible study before opening fire.

            “I have to do it,” the gunman was quoted as saying. “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go.”



            This is being investigated as a hate crime.

            it should be -

            Comment


            • #7
              Execute with extreme prejudice.

              Rocks are cheap.

              It won't hurt once the pain is gone.
              Where is the evidence for a global flood?
              E≈mc2
              "the best maths don't need no stinkin' numbers"

              "The waters under the 'expanse' were under the crust."
              -Bob B.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by patrick jane View Post
                it should be -
                Yeah, if this doesn't fit the bill I can't imagine what would.




                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Granite View Post
                  Yeah, if this doesn't fit the bill I can't imagine what would.
                  The worst of it is that it's probable that his vile, despicable actions were really born of needing an identity and trying to get some fame. Disgusting.
                  He reveals deep and hidden things; he knows what lies in darkness, and light dwells with him.
                  ~Daniel 2:22

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Granite View Post
                    Yeah, if this doesn't fit the bill I can't imagine what would.
                    Trust an evolutionists to miss the forest for the trees.

                    All murders are hate crimes; while thinking bad thoughts can also be a "hate crime."

                    How about we just call this murderer what he is: a murderer.
                    Where is the evidence for a global flood?
                    E≈mc2
                    "the best maths don't need no stinkin' numbers"

                    "The waters under the 'expanse' were under the crust."
                    -Bob B.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      at least it is not a hate crime when they kill their baby
                      a voice crying in the wilderness :chrysost:

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GFR7 View Post
                        The worst of it is that it's probable that his vile, despicable actions were really born of needing an identity and trying to get some fame. Disgusting.
                        Or just old-fashioned hatred. He appears to have been a fan of both Rhodesia and apartheid--not a good sign.




                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's true, worshipers of any faith ought not think about, or worry about a mass shooting, or any violence/crime -

                          HOWEVER, (that's a big HOW and a big EVER) the leaders and organizers must consider this terrible reality. if it was common practice to have law enforcement, trained security, trained and certified lawful elders, ushers, or known members of a congregation to be lawfully armed and prepared; it would certainly prevent and/or deter any such threats -

                          this can be done voluntarily, with minimal cost, by members of a place of worship, or paid for and included in the operating costs of said church -

                          there is no easy way to deal with these issues, but not preparing and not being prepared shouldn't be one of them -
                          Last edited by patrick jane; June 18th, 2015, 10:09 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by patrick jane View Post
                            It's true, worshipers of any faith ought not think about, or worry about a mass shooting, or any violence/crime -

                            however, the leaders and organizers must consider this terrible reality. if it was common practice to have law enforcement, trained security, trained and certified lawful elders, ushers, or known members of a congregation to be lawfully armed and prepared; it would certainly prevent and/or deter any such threats -

                            this can be done voluntarily, with minimal cost, by members of a place of worship, or paid for and of said church -

                            there is no easy way to deal with these issues, but not preparing and not being prepared shouldn't be one of them -
                            What kind of world do you actually want to live in where cops in a church is "common"?




                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Charleston paper summed up America's relationship with guns perfectly.



                              For those who can't zoom in, it's an ad for GUN STORE, stuck to the OUTSIDE of the paper AFTER it was printed.
                              “In many ways the evidence of our faith is found in our ability to control our tongue (or our keyboard)."
                              -Adam Hamilton

                              “Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.”
                              -Ralph Waldo Emerson

                              Comment

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