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  • Another thing, for people who like to marinade but hate the extra dish to wash. Buy medium resealable bags and place the meat and marinade in that. No mess, you can turn them at will, they won't leave any odors in your refrigerator and there's no extra clean up.
    You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

    Pro-Life






    Comment


    • Again, thank you! I can't cook for squat (except pancakes, I'm a "black belt" in flapjacks) so I'm always open to ideas and recipes. One thing I do struggle with is chicken (and most meats) in that I'm so terrified that I've undercooked it, that I end up overcooking it and leather is more tender.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Feral Phoenician View Post
        Again, thank you! I can't cook for squat (except pancakes, I'm a "black belt" in flapjacks) so I'm always open to ideas and recipes. One thing I do struggle with is chicken (and most meats) in that I'm so terrified that I've undercooked it, that I end up overcooking it and leather is more tender.
        You can always check it with a meat thermometer (they're not very expensive) or look for pink in the center. A long tine fork should easily pierce a chicken breast that's done. If you get a lot of tug pulling the fork out, slice and take a look at that center. With chicken, because the flavor is mostly what you bring to its texture, either a light salt and pepper will make a difference or a good meal, lightly done (which will also include salt and pepper). And I love Wishbone Italian as a grilling marinade. It has a slightly sweet citrus aspect, but understated.

        Weber makes a good all purpose seasoning shaker for chicken, garlic and herb.


        Here's another quick throw together using chicken.

        Buy a large can of white meat chicken, thread it by hand (so that you have a nice pulled look, no real chunks left), saute it in on the stove-top in olive oil and butter, between low and medium heat (on my stove medium is at 6 o'clock on the dial and I'm heating it up at about 9), stirring occasionally. The point isn't to recook, but to get a little crisping. While that's slow cooking put on a pot of bow tie pasta or whatever pasta you like. They should cook out together but, depending on the pasta, you might have to watch your chicken. If you're like me, you'll be using olive oil to keep your pasta from sticking. Drain it, add butter and a little salt (to taste) then top the pasta with the chicken and toss it. I usually add a couple of dashes of Parmesan cheese, and take it straight to the table.

        A tasty meal in under twenty minutes.
        You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

        Pro-Life






        Comment


        • Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
          You can always check it with a meat thermometer (they're not very expensive) or look for pink in the center. A long tine fork should easily pierce a chicken breast that's done. If you get a lot of tug pulling the fork out, slice and take a look at that center. With chicken, because the flavor is mostly what you bring to its texture, either a light salt and pepper will make a difference or a good meal, lightly done (which will also include salt and pepper). And I love Wishbone Italian as a grilling marinade. It has a slightly sweet citrus aspect, but understated.

          Weber makes a good all purpose seasoning shaker for chicken, garlic and herb.


          Here's another quick throw together using chicken.

          Buy a large can of white meat chicken, thread it by hand (so that you have a nice pulled look, no real chunks left), saute it in on the stove-top in olive oil and butter, between low and medium heat (on my stove medium is at 6 o'clock on the dial and I'm heating it up at about 9), stirring occasionally. The point isn't to recook, but to get a little crisping. While that's slow cooking put on a pot of bow tie pasta or whatever pasta you like. They should cook out together but, depending on the pasta, you might have to watch your chicken. If you're like me, you'll be using olive oil to keep your pasta from sticking. Drain it, add butter and a little salt (to taste) then top the pasta with the chicken and toss it. I usually add a couple of dashes of Parmesan cheese, and take it straight to the table.

          A tasty meal in under twenty minutes.
          I had a meat thermometer at one point in time, I have no idea what happened to it. I'll give the Wishbone Italian a shot, but do you also have other recommendations for a marinade?

          That's a neat little "trick" for the chicken and pasta. Bowtie pasta is a "win" with my daughters, though they call them "butterflies". Is there a sauce you recommend? I know from prior experience my daughters won't eat pasta without sauce.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Feral Phoenician View Post
            I had a meat thermometer at one point in time, I have no idea what happened to it. I'll give the Wishbone Italian a shot, but do you also have other recommendations for a marinade?

            That's a neat little "trick" for the chicken and pasta. Bowtie pasta is a "win" with my daughters, though they call them "butterflies". Is there a sauce you recommend? I know from prior experience my daughters won't eat pasta without sauce.
            Depends on their tastes. I use salt and pepper, olive oil and butter along with the Parmesan but it leaves the pasta moist and flavorful, not drenched in some heavier sauce the way some people abuse salads.

            Another relatively light sauce...

            Take the following:
            1/4 tsp oregano
            1/4 tsp basil
            1/4 tsp minced garlic
            1/4 cup chicken broth
            1/4 cup of butter
            3 tablespoons lemon juice

            Don't confuse the cups with tsps.

            Melt the butter over medium heat.
            Stir in the broth, followed by the rest of the ingredients.
            Bring that to a simmer (a bubble or two beginning here and there). Then lower the heat to medium-low, maybe 9 o'clock again.
            Should take about five to seven minutes to thicken. Could be less, depending on your relation to sea level.
            You'll want to add a little salt to taste.

            Should have a buttery-lemon flavor that goes well with chicken and pasta. You can also use this recipe with the whole breast pan idea, cutting the done chicken into cooked strips and nestling them in the pasta after you've put some of the sauce on it. Throw in a light salad and you have a fine, quick meal for the summer.


            Recipe 3:

            Same pasta.

            Cut up skinless chicken breasts into bite sized chunks.
            Mince two cloves of garlic.
            Take around 1/3 cup of oil packed sun dried tomatoes: cut them into thin strips.
            1/2 cup pesto sauce
            Crushed red pepper.

            Heat a tsp of olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat (after giving the pan a minute or two to warm).
            Saute the minced garlic about 30 seconds to make it tender.
            Stir in chicken.
            Season with crushed red pepper flakes (to taste).
            Cook chicken until golden and cooked through (about five minutes per side, ten minutes total).
            Drain cooked pasta and add chicken.
            Add tomato strips.
            Add half cup pesto sauce.
            Toss to coat evenly.

            You can top the whole thing with thinly grated Parmesan cheese for a nice touch of additional flavor. A nice, light Italian meal.

            Alfredo sauce for pasta and/or chicken:

            Ingredients
            • 1 pound fettuccine
            • 3/4 cup heavy cream
            • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
            • 1 1/2 cups finely grated Parmesan cheese (about 4 ounces)
            • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed
            • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed


            When the pasta is nearly done.
            Heat the cream and butter in a large pan over medium heat until the butter has melted and the whole thing simmers.
            Add 1/4 cup of Parmesan, salt and pepper, whisk until you see a creamy texture (doesn't take very long)
            Take the pan from heat until your pasta is finished.
            Strain pasta, but keep 1 cup of the pasta water (you can skim it off before you drain)
            Add your pasta to the large pan of butter and cream.
            Add in 2/3 of that pasta water you kept.
            Add in one cup of that Parmesan.
            Stir/toss carefully (its hot )
            Add water in if you need to until you see the consistency you want in the sauce (some like heavy, others thin).
            Taste to see if it needs more salt or pepper.
            Serve immediately, using the last of the Parmesan for a topping.


            Have to get some work done. I'll be thinking of other recipes and different meats.
            You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

            Pro-Life






            Comment


            • A thousand times, thank you. A gentleman, scholar, and chef! You got a nice triple threat going on

              I'll get some chicken (both raw and pre-cooked) next week and experiment. I've copied and pasted your recipes onto my notepad app for easy reference.

              Comment


              • In this Momentary Life, tomorrow should be "interesting".

                I have my daughters through tomorrow, and my ex wife is coming over. There is no animosity between us, actually we're great friends. But...my parents are coming over, too.

                It was a "scandal of scandals" when she and I married, and equally scandalous when we had the girls. However, my girls are the light of my parent's lives.

                My mother is always cordial and warm with my ex, my Dad...not so much. He's not nasty with her, but he sure isn't friendly, either.

                Here's to hoping the BBQ goes off without drama. I hope everyone here has a great 4th!

                Comment


                • I don't use Siri very often because I get frustrated with it. Like the day I asked it for directions and it gave me a destination that was over 2000 miles away. I was thoroughly exasperated at that point, and the "conversation" went downhill from there. This is an exact transcript, because I saved the pages:

                  Me: "You're making things difficult."

                  Siri: "I don't really like these arbitrary categories, Me."

                  Me: "Do you always search for things on the web when you don't know what I'm talking about?"

                  Siri: "Sigh."

                  Me: "I'm sad."

                  Siri: "It's okay to cry if you want to. My aluminosilicate glass surface is tear resistant."

                  Last edited by annabenedetti; August 16th, 2016, 08:06 PM.

                  Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
                    I don't use Siri very often because I get frustrated with it. Like the other day I asked it for directions and it gave me a destination that was over 2000 miles away. I was thoroughly exasperated at that point, and the "conversation" went downhill from there. This is an exact transcript, because I saved the pages:

                    Me: "You're making things difficult."

                    Siri: "I don't really like these arbitrary categories, Me."

                    Me: "Do you always search for things on the web when you don't know what I'm talking about?"

                    Siri: "Sigh."

                    Me: "I'm sad."

                    Siri: "It's okay to cry if you want to. My aluminosilicate glass surface is tear resistant."



                    Dad has a fairly malicious driving program that routinely led us into horrible neighborhoods on a long trip and would then intone, "You have reached your destination."
                    Last edited by Town Heretic; August 17th, 2016, 11:30 AM.
                    You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

                    Pro-Life






                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post


                      Dad has a fairly driving program that routinely led us into horrible neighborhoods on a long trip and would then intone, "You have reached your destination."
                      My commiserations.

                      I have a navigation system in my car that's equally uncooperative. Once I put in a destination and it wanted to begin by sending me around the block (literally around the block!) and so I just started driving and figured it out myself - but I let the navigation system twist itself into knots trying to get me back on track.

                      Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
                        My commiserations.
                        Sorry for the missing "malicious" after "fairly"...I blame the machinery. It k-n-o-w-s what I'm up to.

                        I have a navigation system in my car that's equally uncooperative. Once I put in a destination and it wanted to begin by sending me around the block (literally around the block!) and so I just started driving and figured it out myself - but I let the navigation system twist itself into knots trying to get me back on track.
                        You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

                        Pro-Life






                        Comment


                        • So my son is wandering about the house the other day with a small pole and a long bit of string dangling at the end. He's remembered a thing I said in passing. Sure enough, he wants a clothespin to put on the end of it and I oblige. He's off to fish the deep waters around the bed, already considering the leviathans gathering beneath.

                          I was describing a Halloween event in our small town, before the school closed, before it burned or was burned to the ground, before it became a park where he plays. I recalled for him my wandering along one of those old, thundering halls--I had to have been Jack's age or a year older. The community gathered there for seasonal events like that. Beautiful old, brick building with those great resonating floors and impossibly high plank ceilings... along the large U shaped turn of the building and outside of the central gymnasium that was running the haunted house, were a series of booths, for face painting and fortune telling, that sort of thing. One stretch had a curtain running along with fishing poles and clothespins nearby. You handed your little paper ticket to the person standing ready and she gave you a pole. One cast over the curtain and the rest was waiting for the tug, heart thumping inside your chest, the anticipation of the moment tingling through your arms like a current.

                          A tug, a pull and there it was, a paper bag filled with who knows what. Little toys. This and thats, nothings, and everything you could hold in your imagination for a moment. The sum of a season. Joy.

                          I told Jack about it and as I told him I recalled the little gray dinosaur I found that night, a gem among small treasures to a child. I went to sleep with it in my hand. I kept it for decades. I keep it still.

                          God bless children and childhood. God bless memories that can stir us across years, draw us back to them like old friends and remind us that life has always been at its very best about hope and wonder. And God bless you in the coming seasons and beyond.

                          Last edited by Town Heretic; October 13th, 2016, 01:18 PM.
                          You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

                          Pro-Life






                          Comment


                          • Town,

                            When I was born my paternal grandparents gave me a wind-up Fisher-Price wooden music box that played "Jack and Jill." For years and years my grand-dad and I passed that thing back and forth every Christmas.

                            My grandparents have been gone a long time but that silly music box sits on one of my bookshelves and takes me back to days when they were here. My granddad taught me how to ride a bicycle, to fish, to bowl, to drive, to always put my eye-glasses in the same spot so I wouldn't miss-place them. He taught me how to clean up after myself in the kitchen. He taught me to always have a bowl of ice-cream in the evenings. He taught me to watch Johnny Carson's monologue.

                            He taught me how to talk side-band on his radio and how to dance. He taught me how men are supposed to treat women.

                            Thanks for the memories and the blessings.



                            *Right now counts forever!

                            Romans 14:12
                            Matt. 12:36-37

                            !



                            - Psalmist
                            - Desert Reign

                            Comment


                            • So a water pipe burst along the acreage this morning, leading to a few hours of locating, digging, cutting and patching. After I turned the water back on I went to the end of the lane and was down low on all fours peering into the recess where our meter lies, waiting for the triangle to slow and stop, when a neighbor stops along the roadside. I hear the car window open. Then...

                              Neighbor: "[My name], what in the world are you doing?"

                              Me: Looking up. "I've converted to Islam. I'm praying."

                              Neighbor: (a beat) "Really. (another beat) You know you're facing the wrong way."

                              Me: "Well, I'm not very good at it yet."

                              I live in a funny town.
                              Last edited by Town Heretic; January 16th, 2017, 11:36 AM.
                              You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

                              Pro-Life






                              Comment


                              • I am truly sorry for many of my friends on the right...having listened to the gnashing of teeth and bitter lamentations, the outraged sense of present doom as they labored to keep guns no one was taking and the liberty no one was infringing upon. And I thought to myself, when the election came and went, "Well, at least they will finally find some happiness, some ease and peace in the electoral victory and the power of two branches of government it cemented." There was a bit of solace in that, much as the means of that comfort disappointed and disturbed me.

                                Now I listen to them and an old human truth reemerges: some people just aren't happy unless they're miserable and making others like them. Give them power and they want compliance. Give them compliance and they want agreement. Give them agreement and they want to be loved for it. One need following another until the impossible is reached and they can begin the war that resembles in their distortions, love.
                                You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

                                Pro-Life






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