RSR's List of Problems with Solar System Formation

Stripe

Teenage Adaptive Ninja Turtle
LIFETIME MEMBER
Hall of Fame
Well done, you responded exactly as you always do.
There's little else that can be done when you refuse to engage sensibly. :idunno:

What was that prediction? It hasn't been detailed in this thread yet.
Try OP. :up:

I thought that Pluto was only supposed to be "lightly cratered," but that looks like quite a lot of craters to me.

That's nice.

Perhaps you'll inverstigate a body that is heavily cratered and re-evaluate. :up:
 

gcthomas

New member
I thought that Pluto was only supposed to be "lightly cratered," but that looks like quite a lot of craters to me.

Dying worry, Stripe and scientific reasoning haven't been on speaking terms for a long time. We both know that the cratering on Pluto want done six thousand years ago, but Stripe is so wedded to one particular interpretation of the Bible that he has had to throw most science or to make space for his assertions. And you'll never persuade him, he is in too deep to even see out now.
 

Stripe

Teenage Adaptive Ninja Turtle
LIFETIME MEMBER
Hall of Fame
Dying worry, Stripe and scientific reasoning haven't been on speaking terms for a long time. We both know that the cratering on Pluto want done six thousand years ago, but Stripe is so wedded to one particular interpretation of the Bible that he has had to throw most science or to make space for his assertions. And you'll never persuade him, he is in too deep to even see out now.
What assertions?

Start making sense. :up:

Sent from my SM-A520F using TOL mobile app
 

User Name

Well-known member

gcthomas

New member

Stripe

Teenage Adaptive Ninja Turtle
LIFETIME MEMBER
Hall of Fame

gcthomas

New member
From NASA:

"A newly discovered mountain range lies near the southwestern margin of Pluto’s Tombaugh Regio (Tombaugh Region), situated between bright, icy plains and dark, heavily-cratered terrain."

Read more at the source: https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/nasa-s-new-horizons-finds-second-mountain-range-in-pluto-s-heart

I think that Stripe believes that if only a part of Pluto has an ancient surface then he is free to claim that the young parts were cratered during the explosive flood that he things created the comets 5000 years ago.

And the old bits were just magicked into existence, craters and all, just before then to fool us all. :idunno:
 

way 2 go

Well-known member
one on the left

" represents the expectations of secular astronomers depicting a heavily cratered body grimy from sweeping up billions of years of space dust."


pluto-old-earth-assumption-vs-young-earth-reality.jpg
 

User Name

Well-known member
one on the left

" represents the expectations of secular astronomers depicting a heavily cratered body grimy from sweeping up billions of years of space dust."


The spacecraft's good views of the daylit side of Pluto reveal more than 1,000 craters in the icy surface, but they're not evenly distributed. According to to Kelsi Singer (Southwest Research Institute), Pluto's northern and mid-latitudes, along with the enigmatic dark region that's been dubbed Cthulhu, appear to be oldest — surfaces largely unchanged for perhaps 4 billion years.

High-resolution images from New Horizons have revealed more than 1,000 craters on Pluto's icy surface. But they're completely absent in the region informally named Sputnik Planum, suggesting that it's geologically very young:

Pluto-crater-map.jpg


By contrast, the eastern half of the big, heart-shaped plain known as Tombaugh Regio might be just 1 billion years old. And billiard-ball-smooth Sputnik Planum, completely craterless, can't be any older than about 10 million years — and could be much younger.



-- http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/pluto-stuns-scientists-111020155/
 

6days

New member
What is that you ask? it is a "crater-strewn region" of Pluto. However the lack of crators on the planet surprises astronomers.

"Pluto’s surface surprisingly full of mountains and lacking craters"

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...9df88e-2b3d-11e5-a250-42bd812efc09_story.html

" why is Pluto lacking a lot of craters? I Colorado astronomer explains why"*http://www.cpr.org/news/story/why-pluto-lacking-lot-craters-colorado-astronomer-explains

" Pluto keeps surprising NASA*....internal heat, which could also explain the diversity of Pluto's landforms and its surprising lack of craters in the closest images seen so far."*https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/te...ttp://www.theglobeandmail.com&service=mobile*

"first detailed images are*surprising, showing a remarkable*lack*of impact*craters*on both*Pluto*and Charon"*http://theconversation.com/historic...on-charon-present-puzzle-for-scientists-44615
Sorry about all the Asterix. I have no idea why my phone inserts them
 

gcthomas

New member
What is that you ask? it is a "crater-strewn region" of Pluto. However the lack of crators on the planet surprises astronomers.

"Pluto’s surface surprisingly full of mountains and lacking craters"

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...9df88e-2b3d-11e5-a250-42bd812efc09_story.html

" why is Pluto lacking a lot of craters? I Colorado astronomer explains why"*http://www.cpr.org/news/story/why-pluto-lacking-lot-craters-colorado-astronomer-explains

" Pluto keeps surprising NASA*....internal heat, which could also explain the diversity of Pluto's landforms and its surprising lack of craters in the closest images seen so far."*https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/te...ttp://www.theglobeandmail.com&service=mobile*

"first detailed images are*surprising, showing a remarkable*lack*of impact*craters*on both*Pluto*and Charon"*http://theconversation.com/historic...on-charon-present-puzzle-for-scientists-44615
Sorry about all the Asterix. I have no idea why my phone inserts them

Thanks, interesting links, but they are old. One was from before closest approach of New Horizons, the other two articles were published a day or so after, so the interviewed hadn't yet seen 99% of the images taken. Downloading took about 500 days, 6days. Even so, the scientists were clearly only talking about the icy plain, and the first scientist didn't mention craters once from my read through.

Haven't you got anything to support your views that was written after the data was collected? After the high resolution photos had been seen? Relying on approach imaging from two years ago is a bit weak.

On the *...* - they look like markdown italic tags. Have you set markdown support anywhere in your phone or PC, or in the TOL post editor?
 

6days

New member
Thanks, interesting links, but they are old. One was from before closest approach of New Horizons, the other two articles were published a day or so after, so the interviewed hadn't yet seen 99% of the images taken. Downloading took about 500 days, 6days. Even so, the scientists were clearly only talking about the icy plain, and the first scientist didn't mention craters once from my read through.

Haven't you got anything to support your views that was written after the data was collected? After the high resolution photos had been seen? Relying on approach imaging from two years ago is a bit weak.

On the *...* - they look like markdown italic tags. Have you set markdown support anywhere in your phone or PC, or in the TOL post editor?

Hey GC... thanks for reply. Yes, my links were old so perhaps my 'best by' date is past. I could be wrong but it seems even more recent articles are surprised at the 'Sputnik Planum' area of Pluto and the lack of craters?
Thanks for suggestions on the *asterik* problem I have, but I don't understand what "markdown support" is. I have always had that problem on TOL, even with previous phone.
 

Jonahdog

BANNED
Banned
Hey GC... thanks for reply. Yes, my links were old so perhaps my 'best by' date is past. I could be wrong but it seems even more recent articles are surprised at the 'Sputnik Planum' area of Pluto and the lack of craters?
Thanks for suggestions on the *asterik* problem I have, but I don't understand what "markdown support" is. I have always had that problem on TOL, even with previous phone.

Scientists are surprised, ergo God. Nope, but keep trying, maybe someday you will join the rational world.
 

User Name

Well-known member
Hey GC... thanks for reply. Yes, my links were old so perhaps my 'best by' date is past. I could be wrong but it seems even more recent articles are surprised at the 'Sputnik Planum' area of Pluto and the lack of craters?

It may be little more than speculation at this point but I already posted a link to an article which states that "NASA scientists have revealed that an impact by a meteor the 'size of Manhattan' may explain the icy, crater-free zone of Pluto the New Horizons team unofficially named Sputnik Planum."

Link here: http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/new-ho...rous-reason-plutos-crater-free-sputnik-planum
 
Top