Is there a risk of death from the covid vaccine?

marke

Well-known member
This statement from your source is evidence of a totally false narrative being circulated by government and research officials who either do not know what they are talking about or are deliberately lying.:

The U.S. Intelligence Community said in an April 30, 2020, statement that it “concurs with the wide scientific consensus that the COVID-19 virus was not manmade or genetically modified,” and that it “will continue to rigorously examine emerging information and intelligence to determine whether the outbreak began through contact with infected animals or if it was the result of an accident at a laboratory in Wuhan.”

The only scientists claiming covid came from a natural transfer from animal to human are those showing a willingness to support a lie that cannot be scientifically demonstrated to be true.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...an-says-ex-head-MI6-Sir-Richard-Dearlove.html - Proof coronavirus is man-made.
 

marke

Well-known member

MYTH: COVID-19 vaccines were developed with fetal tissue.​

FACT: The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines did not use fetal tissue during development or testing. In the 1960s, many vaccines did use fetal tissue during development and testing, but this process was not used for the currently approved mRNA vaccines.

I don't believe any mRNA vaccines were developed without using stem cells from aborted babies. The vaccines may not have stem cells but the research which developed the vaccines definitely relied upon stem cell research.

Three Covid-19 vaccine candidates that have received federal funding through the White House’s Operation Warp Speed have also used cells from fetal tissue in their research. AstraZeneca and Moderna both used the HEK293T cell line in early studies on their vaccines. Johnson & Johnson used a different cell line called PER.C6, also derived from fetal cells, to test its vaccine’s effectiveness against Covid-19.
 

User Name

Well-known member
I don't believe any mRNA vaccines were developed without using stem cells from aborted babies. The vaccines may not have stem cells but the research which developed the vaccines definitely relied upon stem cell research.

Three Covid-19 vaccine candidates that have received federal funding through the White House’s Operation Warp Speed have also used cells from fetal tissue in their research. AstraZeneca and Moderna both used the HEK293T cell line in early studies on their vaccines. Johnson & Johnson used a different cell line called PER.C6, also derived from fetal cells, to test its vaccine’s effectiveness against Covid-19.
That has nothing whatsoever to do with the vaccines. Try again. Or better yet, don't.
 

User Name

Well-known member
I think you must be mistaken. The title of the article is "How cells taken from decades-old fetal tissue are used in Covid-19 drug research."
"How cells taken from decades-old fetal tissue are used in Covid-19 drug research."

Drugs, not coronavirus vaccines. Are you reading-impaired?
 

marke

Well-known member
"How cells taken from decades-old fetal tissue are used in Covid-19 drug research."

Drugs, not coronavirus vaccines. Are you reading-impaired?
You have been told no fetal tissues were used in the development of covid vaccines, but that is wrong. Here is another article:

In various stages of vaccine development and manufacturing, some of the COVID-19 vaccines used cells originally isolated from fetal tissue (often referred to as fetal cells), some of which were originally derived from an aborted fetus. The use of fetal cell lines is a very sensitive and important topic within some faith communities and among individuals with concerns about the ethics of using materials derived in this way.
 

User Name

Well-known member
Stem cells are grown in laboratories? Where do you think stem cells come from?
Fetal cell lines are not the same as fetal tissue. Fetal cell lines are cells that grow in a laboratory. They descend from cells taken from elective abortions in the 1970s and 1980s. Those individual cells from the 1970s and 1980s have since multiplied into many new cells over the past four or five decades, creating fetal cell lines. On March 2, leaders in the Roman Catholic Church released a statement saying that it’s “morally acceptable” to receive the vaccine.

 

User Name

Well-known member
From your link:

This does not mean the jabs do not work. Scientists have always been honest that they are not perfect and millions will still be vulnerable to infection even after getting both doses.

Infections are rising fastest among young Britons — many of whom have only received one dose. But the ZOE app counts these people as 'vaccinated' even though they are not yet fully protected by two doses. A second dose of all vaccines has been shown to be much more effective than a first dose against the Indian 'Delta' variant.

Studies show a single dose is less effective at preventing infection, although it still drastically slashes the risk of hospitalisation and death. Jabs are also slightly weaker against the Indian variant, which triggered the third wave.

 

marke

Well-known member
"How cells taken from decades-old fetal tissue are used in Covid-19 drug research."

Drugs, not coronavirus vaccines. Are you reading-impaired?
You obviously do not know all there is to know about how mRNA vaccines have been developed. Here is a long article with a lit of information related to the development of the corona vaccine. See if you can see anything about stem cells in this article.

But what the companies share may be bigger than their differences: Both are banking on a genetic technology that has long held huge promise but has so far run into biological roadblocks. It is called synthetic messenger RNA, an ingenious variation on the natural substance that directs protein production in cells throughout the body. ...
Derrick Rossi, a native of Toronto who rooted for the Maple Leafs and sported a soul patch, was a 39-year-old postdoctoral fellow in stem cell biology at Stanford University in 2005 when he read the first paper. ...
He wondered whether modified messenger RNA might hold the key to obtaining something else researchers desperately wanted: a new source of embryonic stem cells.
In a feat of biological alchemy, embryonic stem cells can turn into any type of cell in the body. That gives them the potential to treat a dizzying array of conditions, from Parkinson’s disease to spinal cord injuries.
But using those cells for research had created an ethical firestorm because they are harvested from discarded embryos.
Rossi thought he might be able to sidestep the controversy. He would use modified messenger molecules to reprogram adult cells so that they acted like embryonic stem cells. ...
As he listened to Rossi describe his use of modified mRNA, Langer recalled, he realized the young professor had discovered something far bigger than a novel way to create stem cells. Cloaking mRNA so it could slip into cells to produce proteins had a staggering number of applications, Langer thought, and might even save millions of lives.
“I think you can do a lot better than that,” Langer recalled telling Rossi, referring to stem cells. “I think you could make new drugs, new vaccines — everything.”
 

marke

Well-known member
Fetal cell lines are not the same as fetal tissue. Fetal cell lines are cells that grow in a laboratory. They descend from cells taken from elective abortions in the 1970s and 1980s. Those individual cells from the 1970s and 1980s have since multiplied into many new cells over the past four or five decades, creating fetal cell lines. On March 2, leaders in the Roman Catholic Church released a statement saying that it’s “morally acceptable” to receive the vaccine.

You are wrong if you think stem cells are no longer harvested from aborted babies and you are wrong if you think the fact that abortion is legal somehow makes stem cell research OK.
 

User Name

Well-known member
On March 1, as public access to COVID-19 vaccines became more common, Donald Trump appeared at a far-right gathering and after insisting that he wanted credit for the development of the vaccines, the former president told a CPAC audience, "So everybody, go get your shot."

About a week later, the Republican issued a related statement that meandered, and was annoyingly whiny, but which was nevertheless pro-vaccine: Trump called the shots "beautiful" and suggested that "everyone" would be receiving them.

 

marke

Well-known member
On March 1, as public access to COVID-19 vaccines became more common, Donald Trump appeared at a far-right gathering and after insisting that he wanted credit for the development of the vaccines, the former president told a CPAC audience, "So everybody, go get your shot."

About a week later, the Republican issued a related statement that meandered, and was annoyingly whiny, but which was nevertheless pro-vaccine: Trump called the shots "beautiful" and suggested that "everyone" would be receiving them.

Trump haters will hate Trump until the day they die. They do not know the love of God and know nothing about loving your enemies.
 

User Name

Well-known member
Trump haters will hate Trump until the day they die. They do not know the love of God and know nothing about loving your enemies.
Have you taken leave of your senses? How does your reply relate in any way to what I posted? Here it is again, try to stay on topic this time:

On March 1, as public access to COVID-19 vaccines became more common, Donald Trump appeared at a far-right gathering and after insisting that he wanted credit for the development of the vaccines, the former president told a CPAC audience, "So everybody, go get your shot."

About a week later, Trump called the shots "beautiful" and suggested that "everyone" would be receiving them.

Maddow Blog | Trump's rhetoric on vaccines takes a dramatic turn for the worse
 

User Name

Well-known member
With the delta variant surging in the United States, doctors are urging everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated -- including the more than 30 million people who have already had COVID-19.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, getting vaccinated after recovering from infection leads to even stronger protection compared to infection alone.

 

User Name

Well-known member
"The vaccine is worse than the disease!"

When asked which poses a greater risk to their health, more unvaccinated Americans say the COVID-19 vaccines than say the virus itself, according to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll — a view that contradicts all available science and data and underscores the challenges that the United States will continue to face as it struggles to stop a growing “pandemic of the unvaccinated” driven by the hyper-contagious Delta variant.

The survey of 1,715 U.S. adults, which was conducted from July 13 to 15, found that just 29 percent of unvaccinated Americans believe the virus poses a greater risk to their health than the vaccines — significantly less than the number who believe the vaccines represent the greater health risk (37 percent) or say they’re not sure (34 percent).

 
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