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  • The Barbarian
    replied
    INTP

    Always is. I used to give the test to my AP classes in science, having score themselves, and telling them that they didn't need to share it with anyone else, just keep in in mind when studying and doing projects.

    I then discussed how different people could most effectively learn. For example, some people should carefully build understanding from basic material presented in the lectures, while others should go to the website and read the summary before looking over the notes.

    One student shared with me, saying she thought she was the only person in the world like herself. (She was an NT). I told her that an AP science class was probably the most likely place to find other NTs. Interestingly, there's a surprising number of left-handed people in AP science and math, and in Gifted and Talented classes. I did a poll every year, and we always had more lefties than the general population.

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  • quip
    replied
    13.64%

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  • annabenedetti
    replied
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    I had a number of neutral responses and the rest were strongly. I reserved the neutral for questions where I wasn't in complete agreement (usually the solution end) but was with the set-up.
    I had a mix of strongly, very strongly, and neutral.

    Also, the only way I got the non-blank page was by cutting off everything past the RWA in your link. If I left it as-is it was a snowstorm.
    Yeah I figured that out yesterday, but the link should be good now.

    Looking at it now (will update) for problematic questions...

    I said no to additional questions and my overall score was lower this time, at 18.75. I'm not sure what was responsible for the change.
    I had reservations similar to what you noted, but wonder if they give more of a pause to those less likely to have RWA tendencies, because it seems slightly more questions were designed to elicit a strongly or very strongly agree RWA response, and maybe that was the aim.

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  • Town Heretic
    replied
    Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
    It's always the wording, but at least this Likert scale has a neutral option, which I'd rather have, although opinions vary. Plus I'm already aware of what happens if I consistently pick "very strongly" over "strongly," so I can't even be sure I'm not biasing myself when I take it even if I try to just go with the first natural response.

    Anyway. I took the test twice a few hours apart, the first time it was 15.15 IIRC, and the second time it was 20.45, and I think the difference was the second time I shifted to "strongly" from "very strongly" a couple times since I thought maybe I overreacted with a couple "very strongly disagree" based on personal animosity - and then a couple questions I answered with neutral because I didn't like the wording of the question, so I'm probably not the best test subject.
    I had a number of neutral responses and the rest were strongly. I reserved the neutral for questions where I wasn't in complete agreement (usually the solution end) but was with the set-up.

    I'm going to take it again in a minute without that guide.

    Also, the only way I got the non-blank page was by cutting off everything past the RWA in your link. If I left it as-is it was a snowstorm.

    Looking at it now (will update) for problematic questions.

    1. Gays and lesbians are just as healthy and moral as everyone else.

    I thought lesbians were gay...second, everyone knows it's "The Gays," and lastly, how moral and healthy is everyone else?

    2. Atheists and others who have rebelled against the established religions are no doubt every bit as good and virtuous as those who attend church regularly.
    Who decides the standards? The BTK guy was a deacon, so the attendance thing doesn't seem like much of a wind sock. And rebelled in what way?

    3. The "old-fashioned ways" and the "old-fashioned values" still show the best way to live.
    Should read "traditional" as the "old-fashioned" choice pushes the answer toward no.

    4. There are many radical, immoral people in our country today, who are trying to ruin it for their own godless purposes, whom the authorities should put out of action.
    I'd say yes to the first part and no to the last. So that's an irritating one. Not everything that's wrong with us needs a law to fix. A lot of it is simply up to us...maybe that was the point, but it still irks me as questions go.

    5.
    A "woman's place" should be wherever she wants to be. The days when women are submissive to their husbands and social conventions belong strictly in the past.
    Every social convention? A bit out of left field with the caveat, or poorly phrased.

    6.
    There is no "one right way" to live life; everybody has to create their own way.
    I don't believe the first/premise, but everyone has the right to choose their context within the law. As it stands I can't agree with it.

    I said no to additional questions and my overall score was lower this time, at 18.75. I'm not sure what was responsible for the change.
    Last edited by Town Heretic; June 9th, 2019, 11:21 AM.

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  • annabenedetti
    replied
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    24%, mostly over the wording of a few.

    Also, I went into extra innings where they asked me to respond to statements made for me by indicating if I agreed or disagreed across a range.

    One that stumped me went, "I see myself as anxious and easily upset."

    I had to wonder if I responded "Strongly Disagree," would I be arguing against myself?

    It's always the wording, but at least this Likert scale has a neutral option, which I'd rather have, although opinions vary. Plus I'm already aware of what happens if I consistently pick "very strongly" over "strongly," so I can't even be sure I'm not biasing myself when I take it even if I try to just go with the first natural response.

    Anyway. I took the test twice a few hours apart, the first time it was 15.15 IIRC, and the second time it was 20.45, and I think the difference was the second time I shifted to "strongly" from "very strongly" a couple times since I thought maybe I overreacted with a couple "very strongly disagree" based on personal animosity - and then a couple questions I answered with neutral because I didn't like the wording of the question, so I'm probably not the best test subject.

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  • Town Heretic
    replied
    Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
    I've had both wifi issues and trouble logging into TOL today, but the blank page is all on me, I'll go fix the link.

    It's fixed. Let me know what you get.
    24%, mostly over the wording of a few.

    Also, I went into extra innings where they asked me to respond to statements made for me by indicating if I agreed or disagreed across a range.

    One that stumped me went, "I see myself as anxious and easily upset."

    I had to wonder if I responded "Strongly Disagree," would I be arguing against myself?

    Leave a comment:


  • annabenedetti
    replied
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    For some reason I got a blank page that wouldn't load. Maybe it's the weather.
    I've had both wifi issues and trouble logging into TOL today, but the blank page is all on me, I'll go fix the link.

    It's fixed. Let me know what you get.

    Leave a comment:


  • Town Heretic
    replied
    Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
    This one could be fun.

    This is an interactive version of the Right-wing Authoritarianism Scale.

    Introduction: Following World War II there was a significant amount of interest in what was termed the "authoritarian personality". Psychologists wanted to understand the psychologies of fascist regimes and their followers. This line of research produced the California F-scale (F for fascist) in 1947. The Right-wing Authoritarianism Scale was developed by Bob Altemeyer in 1981 as a revision of the F-scale that improved its statistical properties.

    Procedure: The test consists of twenty two opinions and for each you must indicate how much you agree with it. The test should take 3 - 5 minutes to complete.

    Participation: This test is provided for educational use only. It should not be used as psychological advice of any kind and comes without any guarantee of accuracy or fitness for any particular purpose. Also, your responses may be recorded and anonymously used for research or otherwise distributed.

    START

    Source:
    Altemeyer, Bob. Right-wing authoritarianism. University of Manitoba press, 1981.
    Altemeyer, Bob (2007). The Authoritarians. University of Manitoba.
    https://www.theauthoritarians.org
    For some reason I got a blank page that wouldn't load. Maybe it's the weather.

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  • The Barbarian
    replied
    Got a 24 on the authoritarian test. Somewhat surprised it was that high.

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  • annabenedetti
    replied
    This one could be fun.

    This is an interactive version of the Right-wing Authoritarianism Scale.

    Introduction: Following World War II there was a significant amount of interest in what was termed the "authoritarian personality". Psychologists wanted to understand the psychologies of fascist regimes and their followers. This line of research produced the California F-scale (F for fascist) in 1947. The Right-wing Authoritarianism Scale was developed by Bob Altemeyer in 1981 as a revision of the F-scale that improved its statistical properties.

    Procedure: The test consists of twenty two opinions and for each you must indicate how much you agree with it. The test should take 3 - 5 minutes to complete.

    Participation: This test is provided for educational use only. It should not be used as psychological advice of any kind and comes without any guarantee of accuracy or fitness for any particular purpose. Also, your responses may be recorded and anonymously used for research or otherwise distributed.

    START

    Source:
    Altemeyer, Bob. Right-wing authoritarianism. University of Manitoba press, 1981.
    Altemeyer, Bob (2007). The Authoritarians. University of Manitoba.
    https://www.theauthoritarians.org
    Last edited by annabenedetti; June 8th, 2019, 07:31 PM.

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  • quip
    replied
    Originally posted by User Name View Post
    The full article is here: https://fivethirtyeight.com/features...one-that-isnt/

    The gist of it is this:

    The most popular — used by the vast majority of scientists who study personality — is called the Big Five, a system that organizes personality around five broad clusters of traits: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness to experience.

    The idea behind the Big Five is that everyone’s personality has a little of all five trait groups. What the test does, essentially, is tell you where you fall on the spectrum of each of the clusters.

    The Big Five, [Vazire] told me, has produced results that can be shown to remain largely consistent across a person’s lifespan and that can be used to predict at least some part of a person’s likely academic achievement, dating choices and even future parenting behavior. It has also been validated cross-culturally to some extent.
    Seems similar to the HEXACO profiler.

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  • User Name
    replied
    Originally posted by quip View Post
    What's so special about this one? (I took it BTW)
    The full article is here: https://fivethirtyeight.com/features...one-that-isnt/

    The gist of it is this:

    The most popular — used by the vast majority of scientists who study personality — is called the Big Five, a system that organizes personality around five broad clusters of traits: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness to experience.

    The idea behind the Big Five is that everyone’s personality has a little of all five trait groups. What the test does, essentially, is tell you where you fall on the spectrum of each of the clusters.

    The Big Five, [Vazire] told me, has produced results that can be shown to remain largely consistent across a person’s lifespan and that can be used to predict at least some part of a person’s likely academic achievement, dating choices and even future parenting behavior. It has also been validated cross-culturally to some extent.

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  • quip
    replied
    What's so special about this one? (I took it BTW)

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  • User Name
    replied
    Most online personality tests are scientific quackery––except maybe this one:

    http://www.personalitylab.org/tests/bfi2_self_pol.htm

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  • quip
    replied
    Originally posted by ffreeloader View Post
    You keep on insisting that I need to empathize with the innkeeper. As this entire conversation has been about empathizing with those who are hurting your insistence that I empathize with somone to whom no harm was done, and has no reason for greiving in this scenario, is you insisting that something exists for which there is zero evidence. If anything, the innkeeper has reason to rejoice for his business is as successful as it is possible for it to be at this particular moment.
    How do you know that no harm was done? (From the innkeeper's POV)

    There is a whole spectrum of emotions this innkeeper can feel regarding this scenario.

    You seem to take a logical approach to the innkeeper's situation, though the innkeeper may approach the situation completely different than you...as each individual is unique.

    It's about possibilities not (what you project as to) what should exist or doesn't exist. Think of the innkeepers response to the situation as a variable, say X. You may sympathize with them logically and see that the innkeeper should not feel bad (because that's how you would view the situation.) But to empathize with him or her you need to understand the possibility of alternate responses. Accept that his or her X may drastically differ from your X.

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