Tylenol Puts Two Moms into classic 1943 Norman Rockwell Painting

GFR7

New member
Depending on whether we are optimists or pessimists, this will seem like progress, or the opposite. :plain:

tylenol_rockwell_450.jpg



Norman Rockwell's "Freedom from Want" is a classic painting of an American family sitting down for Thanksgiving dinner. Tylenol has given the painting a new twist, however, by using its setting to profile several diverse families, including one with two moms.

Published in 1943, the original painting was one of four inspired by President Franklin Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" speech. The family looks like it came right out of Leave It to Beaver -- White and well off, with a grandfather and grandmother presiding at the head of the table.

In its new "For What Matters Most" campaign, Tylenol views the scene through a more diverse lens. They've created a series of videos to answer the question: "What would a Norman Rockwell holiday look like today?" We are introduced to a Jewish blended family that includes two moms; a Japanese and Chinese American family; and an African American family. In each, the family shares its traditions and talks about what matters to them.

The Beser Carr Schneider Musich family includes two moms and one mom's ex-husband (the father of two of the children), as well as a fourth parent who isn't explained. I love the father's comment that "We don't talk about 'halfs' and 'steps.' We talk about family, and siblings, and parents, and willingness to remain included."
http://www.bilerico.com/2014/12/tyl...rman_rockwell_paintin.php#5kt7pxoDdGwwT64O.99
 

annabenedetti

Well-known member
Yes, this is not 1943 America anymore. :plain:

And that's a good thing.

From your link:
Don't imagine Norman Rockwell turning over in his grave at the re-imagining of his work. Although the painter is most famous for his images of White, mainstream Americana, many of his later paintings dealt with social issues such as civil rights. The Norman Rockwell Museum notes, "In his early career, editorial policies governed the placement of minorities in his illustrations (restricting them to service industry positions only)," but in 1963, he ended his long relationship with the Saturday Evening Post, moving to Look, where he began to address social issues such as racial prejudice.

An early indication of that direction was his 1961 "Golden Rule," which shows people of different races, ethnicities, and religions united in their desire for compassion. His "Murder in Mississippi" was done to illustrate an investigative article in Look magazine about the 1964 murders of three civil rights activists in Mississippi. "The Problem We All Live With," also done for the same magazine that year, portrays the six-year-old Ruby Bridges, an African American girl on her way to an all-White public school, escorted by four deputy U.S. marshals. President Obama has had it exhibited at the White House.




 

resodko

BANNED
Banned
and anna's conversion is complete


comparing the perversion of homosexuality to the triumph over perversion of the civil rights movement
 

annabenedetti

Well-known member
The Beser Carr Schneider Musich family includes two moms and one mom's ex-husband (the father of two of the children), as well as a fourth parent who isn't explained. I love the father's comment that "We don't talk about 'halfs' and 'steps.' We talk about family, and siblings, and parents, and willingness to remain included."

They're a loving and connected family, and that's something to celebrate.
 

annabenedetti

Well-known member
In its new "For What Matters Most" campaign, Tylenol views the scene through a more diverse lens. They've created a series of videos to answer the question: "What would a Norman Rockwell holiday look like today?" We are introduced to a Jewish blended family that includes two moms; a Japanese and Chinese American family; and an African American family. In each, the family shares its traditions and talks about what matters to them.

Depending on whether we are optimists or pessimists, this will seem like progress, or the opposite. :plain:

So regarding all of the families you bolded: Is this progress to you, or the opposite? All the families, since you bolded them all.
 

GFR7

New member
So regarding all of the families you bolded: Is this progress to you, or the opposite? All the families, since you bolded them all.
I am equally optimistic and pessimistic. My own parents were an English Protestant from the MidWest and an Italian Catholic from New York City. It didn't work well. :wave2:
 

annabenedetti

Well-known member
I am equally optimistic and pessimistic. My own parents were an English Protestant from the MidWest and an Italian Catholic from New York City. It didn't work well. :wave2:

A lot of 'traditional' families don't "work well."

But that doesn't stop a lot of 'traditional families' from spending a lot of time looking down their noses at 'non-traditional' families.
 

shagster01

New member
A lot of 'traditional' families don't "work well."

But that doesn't stop a lot of 'traditional families' from spending a lot of time looking down their noses at 'non-traditional' families.

Yep. My white, christian parents got divorced when I was 10 and my mom still complains about how gays are ruining the sanctity of marriage.
 

musterion

Well-known member
Funny that for all Annsabanana's screechy preaching, her own church won't (yet) validate a relationship such as depicted in the ad but prefers to keep most of its queers in the closet. I guess she's one of them Catholics who know better than the Magisterious Magisterium what's what.
 

musterion

Well-known member
Yep. My white, christian parents got divorced when I was 10 and my mom still complains about how gays are ruining the sanctity of marriage.

Why did they split? See, if it's for a valid reason, she can be divorced (still hardly the ideal) and still be right about queers. But I think you know that.
 
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