Sozo's Post of the Day 12/17/04

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Sozo

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Originally posted by LightSon


At what point am I held responsible for my actions and my will?
Does it matter what I do with my body?
Is it enough to say "in Christ, I am righteous"?
Is it a contradiction to say, "as a Christian, I do not sin, so let's get drunk".
Is it not a contradiction to say "I am righteous" and be found wallowing in all manner of debauchery?

Why does scripture over and over and over again appeal to my will, to my volition? "Come out from among them, and be ye separate. And touch not the unclean thing, and I will receive you". Am I gullible then in thinking, "I really need to come out"?

We agree that it is God who works in us "to will". But then if I assert that I am using my will to eschew evil, I get called on the carpet for trying to be self-righteous.

Lot's of little puzzles for me to figure out.

It seems that yielding (surrender) to the Holy Spirit is the key, but then why is so much scriptural emphasis put on specific behaviors? When I advocate not doing certain things, I'm judged a legalist, even though I insist that such avoidance ought to be spirit-led avoidance, based upon scriptural principle.

I realize that self-righteousness is a trap, a thing to be avoided. I also think that the charge of self-rightousness can be a pretense for avoiding self-examination. Scripture calls us to examine ourselves. This is not something that a truly righteousness person needs to do, hence when scripture calls the believer to examine himself, it is suggesting that we have areas to improve, and behaviors which need correction.

I have an understanding of the dynamics between positional righteousness and practical sanctification. There are a few who eschew this dichotomy and would even mock it. Yet I see both in scriputure and I see both in my life.

Context

I am giving LightSon my POTD because of the sincerity in which it was written. It is obvious that the questions he asked come from a heart that truly loves Jesus and struggles with understanding what it means to live the Christian life.

There is no religious piety or agenda on his part to deceive others with another gospel, he truly wants answers.
 

Frank Ernest

New member
Originally posted by LightSon

At what point am I held responsible for my actions and my will?
Does it matter what I do with my body?
Is it enough to say "in Christ, I am righteous"?
Is it a contradiction to say, "as a Christian, I do not sin, so let's get drunk".
Is it not a contradiction to say "I am righteous" and be found wallowing in all manner of debauchery?

Always, yes, no, yes, yes.

Why does scripture over and over and over again appeal to my will, to my volition? "Come out from among them, and be ye separate. And touch not the unclean thing, and I will receive you". Am I gullible then in thinking, "I really need to come out"?

It means avoid "bad" company and occasions of sin.

We agree that it is God who works in us "to will". But then if I assert that I am using my will to eschew evil, I get called on the carpet for trying to be self-righteous.

Your point is? I don't mean to be flip (then again ...) So you get "called on the carpet." So what?

Lot's of little puzzles for me to figure out.

Seems like.

It seems that yielding (surrender) to the Holy Spirit is the key, but then why is so much scriptural emphasis put on specific behaviors? When I advocate not doing certain things, I'm judged a legalist, even though I insist that such avoidance ought to be spirit-led avoidance, based upon scriptural principle.

You depend on the judgment and approval of others? Why?

I realize that self-righteousness is a trap, a thing to be avoided. I also think that the charge of self-rightousness can be a pretense for avoiding self-examination. Scripture calls us to examine ourselves. This is not something that a truly righteousness person needs to do, hence when scripture calls the believer to examine himself, it is suggesting that we have areas to improve, and behaviors which need correction.

Oh yes it is! It is not a "suggestion."

I have an understanding of the dynamics between positional righteousness and practical sanctification. There are a few who eschew this dichotomy and would even mock it. Yet I see both in scriputure and I see both in my life.

You're making this waaaaaaayyyyyyy too complicated. I have no idea what you just said. :confused:
 
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