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Idolater

"Never believe anyone who is not cross-examined."
Forbidding to marry.
Not a Catholic thing.
That man has the ability to forgive sins.
You can forgive the temporal penalties that are under your control for the sins of others, that's called indulgence. Man cannot forgive the eternal consequences of anybody's sins.
That Mary needs to be an intercessor between man and God.
Not a Catholic thing.
All of these are founded in pagan beliefs. The roots of all of these ideas, and a lot more, originated in Nimrod's Babylon. It's a short list right here but it demonstrated the principal.
Then it's a good thing none of those things are true of Catholicism.
If anyone is interested in learning more there is a book written in the 1850s by a Scottish minister that documents the links in detail using ancient history and the Bible. It is titled The Two Babylons written by Alexander Hislop and a is a masterpiece of documentation. I found it a few months ago looking for historical reading material on archive.org. I found later it is available from multiple resources on line as it is long out of any copyright laws. It's a fascinating read.
And if anybody wants to know what the actual Catholic Church says that Catholicism actually teaches and believes, as opposed to misconceptions and misunderstandings, look for the Catechism of the Catholic Church, available in its entirety for free online, and for about 15 USD for a paperback book.
 

ffreeloader

Well-known member
That's not indulgences.
Yeah it is for both practices say the payment of money intercedes with God. Once again there is zero evidence for this in scripture. So where does this belief come from? This is exactly what the pagans surrounding the Jews believed. They could buy their way out of trouble.

So this idea existed thousands of years before the Catholic church existed. It did not originate in Christianity or the Bible it originated in paganism. So how did this pagan belief become part of Catholic beliefs if it didn't come directly from paganism? Demonstrate how it did not originate in paganism other than your assertions that have zero evidence supporting them. Show your evidence.
 

Idolater

"Never believe anyone who is not cross-examined."
... Show your evidence.
Why do I have to show evidence and you don't.

First you show me your source for these claims of what indulgences actually really are, and then I'll tell you why your source is not authoritative, because the only authoritative source for this information is the Catechism of the Catholic Church. And you're not going to show me that as your evidence, I already know that.
 

ffreeloader

Well-known member
That isn't true at all.
False. It's own catechisms teach it. What follows is a direct quote from The Converts Catechism page 51.

The Third Commandment
What is the Third Commandment?
The Third Commandment is: Remember that thou keep
holy the Sabbath day.
Which is the Sabbath day?
Saturday is the Sabbath day.
Why do we observe Sunday instead of Saturday?
We observe Sunday instead of Saturday because the
Catholic Church, in the Council of Laodicea (A.D. 336),
transferred the solemnity from Saturday to Sunday.
 

ffreeloader

Well-known member
Well that's a nice obfuscation but it is not relevant to the issues. It doesn't change the fact that the Catholic church says it changed God's law. And all it demonstrates is it's beliefs were preceded by pagans holding those same beliefs for thousands of years.

It's just the same old same old. No evidence to back up assertions. Should I call you guys zero as you have zero evidence to support your claims? I'm sorry for you that you can't argue truthfully but that isn't my problem. It's yours.

My advice is heed God's call and come out of Babylon if you desire salvation. That's what I wish for you.
 

Catholic Crusader

Kyrie Eleison
Banned
Was the Early Church ‘Catholic’ or Just ‘Christian’?

Protestants often claim that the Church that Jesus founded was the “Christian Church,” not the Catholic Church. The biblical evidence cited for this claim is found in the Acts of the Apostles: “So Barnabas went to Tarsus to look for Saul; and when he had found him, he brought him to Antioch. For a whole year they met with the church, and taught a large company of people; and in Antioch the disciples were for the first time called Christians” (Acts 11:25-26).

Many modern Christians then suppose that the Catholic Church was founded by mere men much later in Christian history.

No doubt, disciples in the early Church became known as Christians. But does this mean that their Church was not the Catholic Church? A little historical study into the church at Antioch reveals that these early Christians’ church was, indeed, the Catholic Church.

One of the things Peter did before he went to Rome was to found the church in Antioch, the third largest city in the Roman Empire at the time. He ordained a disciple there named Evodius to the episcopacy and appointed him the bishop of Antioch. Evodius is believed by many to have been one of the seventy disciples Jesus appointed to go ahead of him to the towns and places where he taught during his second missionary journey (see Luke 10:1). It was during Evodius’s reign as bishop of Antioch that the disciples there were for the first time called Christians. But this isn’t the end of the story!

While Paul was teaching the Christians in Antioch during Evodius’s reign, another young disciple was moving up through the ranks. His name was Ignatius, and he would later become known as Saint Ignatius of Antioch, an early Christian martyr. Ignatius was a disciple of John. Legend has it that, much earlier in his life, Ignatius was the child whom Jesus took in his arms in a passage recorded by Mark:

[Jesus] sat down and called the twelve; and he said to them, “If any one would be first, he must be last of all and servant of all.” And he took a child, and put him in the midst of them; and taking him in his arms, he said to them, “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me; and whoever receives me, receives not me but him who sent me.” (Mark 11:35-37)

This legend demonstrates the great esteem his memory has enjoyed since the early centuries of the Church.

At Antioch, Ignatius was ordained by Paul, and then, at the end of the reign of Evodius, he was appointed bishop of Antioch by Peter. He reigned there for many years before his martyrdom in Rome. On his way to Rome to be martyred, he wrote several letters to fellow Christians in various locations, expounding on Christian theology. He especially emphasized unity among Christians (see John 17) and became known as an Apostolic Father of the Church.

In one of his letters (to Christians in Smyrna), he wrote, “Where there is Christ Jesus, there is the Catholic Church.” This is the earliest known written record of the term “Catholic Church” (written around A.D. 107), but Ignatius seemingly used it with the presumption that the Christians of his day were quite familiar with it. In other words, even though his is the earliest known written record of the term, the term likely had been in use for quite some time by then, dating back to the time of the apostles.

The term “Catholic Church” (Gk. katholike ekklesia) broadly means “universal assembly,” and Ignatius used it when writing to the Christians of Smyrna as a term of unity. He exhorted these Christians to follow their bishop just as the broader universal assembly of Christians follows Christ. He clearly uses the terms “Christian” and “Catholic Church” distinctly: disciples of Christ are Christians; the universal assembly of Christians is the Catholic Church.

Some might claim that Ignatius intended to use the term “Catholic Church” not as a proper name for the Church, but only as a general reference to the larger assembly of Christians. If so, then the universal assembly had no proper name yet, but “Catholic Church” continued in use until it became the proper name of the one church that Christ built on Peter and his successors.

Thus, we see that the Christians of Antioch were part of the Catholic Church. They were indeed Christian disciples, but they were also Catholic. Given the unbroken chain of succession at Antioch—from Peter (sent by Christ) to Evodius to Ignatius—if any Christian today wishes to identify with the biblical Christians of the first century mentioned in Acts 11, it follows quite logically that he must also identify with those same Christians’ universal assembly: the Catholic Church.
 

Idolater

"Never believe anyone who is not cross-examined."
False. It's own catechisms teach it. What follows is a direct quote from The Converts Catechism page 51.
Never heard of it. As predicted you did not provide a source from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which is the only authoritative source for what Catholicism teaches and believes.
 

ffreeloader

Well-known member
Never heard of it. As predicted you did not provide a source from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which is the only authoritative source for what Catholicism teaches and believes.
LOL. Of course catechisms don't originate with the Catholic church. Protestants write them. There must be millions of fake catechisms. Right? Everybody fakes them. :rolleyes:
 

Catholic Crusader

Kyrie Eleison
Banned
From Protestant to Catholic! (Protestant Apologist Converts to Catholic Apologist)

From Protestant to Catholic! (Protestant Apologist to Catholic Apologist). David Martinez after wandering for many years and teaching in Protestant assemblies, finally found the truth of the Catholic Church.

 

Catholic Crusader

Kyrie Eleison
Banned
LOL. Of course catechisms don't originate with the Catholic church. Protestants write them. There must be millions of fake catechisms. Right? Everybody fakes them. :rolleyes:

A Catechism is essentially a study guide, a series of fixed questions, answers, or precepts used for instruction in other situations.

Old catechisms use to be Q and A's for easy learning.

THE Catechism of the Catholic Church is an extensive work of systematic theology.

You would do well to read it and learn some Truth.
 
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