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  • glorydaz
    replied
    Originally posted by The Barbarian View Post
    Some of us don't see dying as a horrible thing. When it's time, it's time. And if you accept God, you have the hope of joining Him.
    Well said, and Paul would agree.
    2 Corinthians 5:1 For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 2 For in this we groan, earnestly desiring to be clothed upon with our house which is from heaven:

    2 Corinthians 5:6Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord:

    2 Corinthians 5:8 We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord.

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  • glorydaz
    replied
    Originally posted by Idolater View Post
    Optimistic about all of us not dying? No, there is no reason for that. I mean, outside of Barbarian just baldly asserting that we should be anyway.
    Not exactly what I said or meant. No matter.

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  • Idolater
    replied
    Originally posted by The Barbarian View Post
    Some of us don't see dying as a horrible thing. When it's time, it's time.
    It's literally the worst thing, when you crunch the numbers. I've done the math.
    Originally posted by The Barbarian View Post
    And if you accept God, you have the hope of joining Him.
    The bishops are supposed to believe that, "There is not a single aspect of the Christian message that is not in part an answer to the question of evil," and in this case, that "evil," is Death.

    So I agree.

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  • Idolater
    replied
    Originally posted by glorydaz View Post
    We aren't dead yet....there's a reason to be optimistic, yes?
    Optimistic about all of us not dying? No, there is no reason for that. I mean, outside of Barbarian just baldly asserting that we should be anyway.

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  • The Barbarian
    replied
    Originally posted by Idolater View Post
    That's it? We're all, gonna die. Why be optimistic?
    Some of us don't see dying as a horrible thing. When it's time, it's time. And if you accept God, you have the hope of joining Him.

    Leave a comment:


  • glorydaz
    replied
    Originally posted by Idolater View Post
    That's it? What if they say, "But I can't stop worrying about it?" Just lather, rinse, and repeat? You've got to give them a reason for optimism, not just see their pessimism and say "you're doing it wrong."

    We're all, gonna die. Why be optimistic?
    We aren't dead yet....there's a reason to be optimistic, yes?

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  • Idolater
    replied
    Originally posted by The Barbarian View Post
    Stop worrying about it.
    That's it? What if they say, "But I can't stop worrying about it?" Just lather, rinse, and repeat? You've got to give them a reason for optimism, not just see their pessimism and say "you're doing it wrong."

    We're all, gonna die. Why be optimistic?

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  • The Barbarian
    replied
    Originally posted by Idolater View Post
    Everybody's going to die.

    How do you spin that?
    Stop worrying about it.

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  • Idolater
    replied
    Originally posted by The Barbarian View Post
    Life, if it's going to be worth living, has to be optimistic.

    Vine near the summit of Lookout Mountain
    Everybody's going to die.

    How do you spin that?

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  • The Barbarian
    replied
    Life, if it's going to be worth living, has to be optimistic.

    Vine near the summit of Lookout Mountain

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  • Idolater
    replied
    Originally posted by Idolater View Post
    ...I did notice recently, emerging out of the east, the constellation Orion. He's lying on his back right now, but soon, he'll stand up and run across from the east to the south and then to the west, where he'll hide until next fall, when he'll once again rise up from his slumber, to make his annual walk across the sky once again, as he's been doing for millennia.
    Especially late into the night now, Orion has begun his traverse across the night sky. He comes up out of the east rather quickly now, and gets up higher into the sky and has begun to stand upright.

    'Such a mystery to me, what was going on with Orion, when he first appeared this year. This is only one or two years into my pondering of the night sky, I never watched it so closely, so it was all brand new. Finally, something clicked in my brain, and I realized, 'It's because Orion is So Far Away, that it looks like that.' That's why it can look like he's rising up from the grave or from sleep, getting up and walking across the night sky, because he's So Far Away.

    And that reminded me of 'Celestrial Spheres,'1 which is how the ancients modeled what they saw occurring throughout each year, which is perceptibly the exact same thing that I'm seeing now. They figured that Orion was on a distinct sphere with its own independent behavior from other spheres, e.g., those that contained the planets. That's how they explained his counterintuitive behavior.

    And all of this is because, as I've said, I take the dog out for its nightly ritual now, so I'm a captive audience when the stars are out. Speaking of which, the dog wasn't feeling well the other day, vomited, and then, sniffed it, and then, began to lick it. It reminded me of 2nd Peter 2:22 KJV and Proverbs 26:11 KJV.

    Stupid dog.


    1 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celestial_spheres

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  • Arthur Brain
    replied
    A good friend of mine lost his mother a month ago and today found out his sister has also died. life is momentary and also fragile indeed.

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  • Idolater
    replied
    There are many different angles from which to see things. From each angle, the thing looks a bit different. I've mentioned the Fundamental Attribution cognitive error that psychologists have identified statistically as an error that befalls mankind. It's just one example of a thing being seen from different angles.

    So from one angle, each of us are supported by our blood. This really clever fluid contains everything our bodies need, and the blood also transports waste products that occur naturally as we metabolize, which is, as we live and breathe. Blood absorbs the nutrients from our gut, and the carbon dioxide from all of our cells as they work. It deposits the carbon dioxide at our lungs, where our breath removes it and replenishes it with fresh air, and it deposits nutrients with our cells, energy, minerals, vitamins, along with the oxygen that it absorbs at the lungs.

    Every organ and muscle in our bodies needs support, and it comes from our blood. Even our hearts need blood, and again, a very clever design, where the heart itself supplies the blood that it needs. The heart is a phenomenal contraption. It doesn't need any other organ in the body to help it get its blood, it does it itself, and it does it through a spontaneously depolarizing mechanism, where special cells in the body develop a voltage, and then that voltage is released spontaneously, and this is why the heart pumps, supplying pressurized blood (blood pressure) to each part of us.

    The Old Testament says that life itself is in the blood, which is why blood sacrifice was prominent. It is also why Christ's blood is so important for Christians, His blood sacrifice.

    And we are the Body of Christ, and a body is flesh and blood, and the Eucharist is Christ's flesh and blood, and the Church is to consume His flesh and blood, in order to be His Body, not just spiritually, or ethereally, or abstractly, but physically. It's how we are the Body of Christ, because we ingest His literal flesh and His literal blood, in receiving Holy Communion.

    Blood is a lot more complex than, but somewhat like a car's engine oil. There are five quarts of oil sloshing around constantly inside the motor, and if it were to all spill out, or if it were to become too contaminated (kidney failure, for example), then the motor (the body) will not be able to continue and will seize (death).

    And it's just magnificent how our bodies keep plugging away, through this eminently clever system of constantly delivering this eminently clever fluid, pressurized, to the farthest reaches of our bodies.

    Leave a comment:


  • Idolater
    replied
    Spoiler
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    A place to make brief observations of the moments in your life that speak to you.
    Spoiler


    #1

    I don't know their names these
    birds at my window singing

    some thing joyful
    For focus.

    It astounds me to think of an object, like an asteroid, traveling over 10,000 MPH.
    Passenger jets travel many hundreds of miles per hour. I see them, five or six miles high, inching across the sky.

    I see shooting stars. They're going 10,000 miles per hour, and they're a lot higher up there than the jetliners, that are going 500-600 MPH, and inching patiently across the sky. Those things are Moving as they 'burn up' from impacting all the molecules of nitrogen and oxygen suddenly. It's a mechanical disintegration, it's not a flame kind of burn up, it's just happening so fast that it's making light.

    It feels a bit naked to see outer space, and especially the shooting stars, which is outer space kind of tapping on the door to earth. It's not the 'big bad wolf' yet. There's some critical size, higher than which, the object will survive our atmosphere and hit the ground. And it's going to be moving at 10,000 MPH. That's like Four Times faster than a rifle bullet. That's what they figured got the dinosaurs. Something huge that came in Four Times faster than a rifle bullet, and crushed the earth.

    But during the day, the blue sky hides all the shootings stars, that are happening all the time. They don't wait for night time. They don't care which side of the earth it is, light or dark. At night we can see them, and during the day we never see them, like we never see the stars. Shooting stars are part of outer space, and we can only see outer space when it's dark.

    It occurs to me that it's the perfect natural reminder to go to bed. 'If you can see outer space, go to bed.' It's like the day is our clothing, and at night we remove our clothing to go to bed, and so, I feel naked looking at the night sky, seeing outer space through the giant lens of our atmosphere.

    But it's the universe that's really naked at night. It's when we can see what it's all up to. During the day, we can't see it, because it's modest and is wearing clothes. And at night it takes them off.

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  • Idolater
    replied
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    A place to make brief observations of the moments in your life that speak to you.

    #1

    I don't know their names these
    birds at my window singing

    some thing joyful
    For focus.

    There are many things about the Catholic Church, that did not bring me to her, but that I'm only now perceiving and appreciating about her, now that I'm mentally on board. One of those things is how she handles death.

    It's comforting, and beautiful, how the Church handles this most grave of topics. You really get the feeling like, when it comes times for me to die, that I'm in good hands, that my family will be in good hands.

    It's something that most other Christian church traditions do not have, and cannot approach. Most non-Catholic churches began far more recently than the Catholic Church, and one of the most significant things about that, is the sheer number of deceased Catholics that there have been, necessarily. It makes sense that an organization as old and large as the Church would have a lot of time to consider death, and to address it in an intelligent, merciful, and loving manner.

    I realized that this fits into the spirit of the OP in this thread, which is why I share it here. Again, this wasn't one of the things that brought me to Catholicism, to the theological school of the Catholic Church, it's only one of the many things I've been able to now appreciate about her, since I've mentally 'crossed the Tiber.'
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    I prefered games where I could use math to make my gamble less dependent.
    There's a lot of math in poker. The best players are mathematicians, some of them even credentialed mathematicians, but they are all mathematicians, to win at the biggest stakes reliably.

    Poker boils down to betting, folding, and raising. The only thing that matters is betting, folding, and raising. When to best bet, fold, or raise, for successful players, is determined by math. It's about odds.

    There's pot odds, which is the size of the pot, compared with the size of your bet. There are the odds of drawing out and making a hand on a future street, which depends upon how many 'outs' you have in the deck, and how many cards are left. There are 'implied odds,' which attempts to take into account the future size of the pot, comparing it also to the required bets to stay in the hand to win that larger pot. There are also things like the rake, and tipping on winning hands, that all go into successfully determining odds that guides successful betting, folding, and raising.

    There's also the notion of 'tropes' that appear in poker, but also irl, where instead of a card game and chips, the situations and currency is substituted for other things. In betting on sports and racing, there is really only betting, which is similar to stock picking, but is only applicable in limited areas irl.

    There are obvious poker tropes like 'bluffing,' 'betting,' 'folding,' but also more nuanced ones like 'slow-playing,' 'check-raising,' and 're-raising-over-the-top-all-in.' But the one that I'm going to mention now is 'pot-committed.' It's when a player has already put most of their stack of chips into the pot, and other players therefore can perceive that they aren't going to fold, but will push the rest of their stack into the pot rather than leave all the chips they've already put into it out there for someone else. Pot commitment is a tell, a telegraph, that can be seen by other players. The other players in the pot with a pot-committed player need to figure on there being a 'show down,' which means that the pot-committed player will not fold to a big raise, but will call all the rest of their chips, forcing a show down of all the players' hands to determine who wins.

    And that is a problem that has been identified by psychologists as a 'cognitive error,' like the Fundamental Attribution Error that we are all susceptible to. It's related to the 'sunken cost fallacy,' which is a cognitive error that falsely believes that currency that has already been spent or 'sunk,' is actually still in your possession. When we make choices according to these errors, we make poor choices, and wind up costing ourselves more dearly than if we remain rational.

    Deception is of course part of poker. Many of the poker tropes involve deception, and poker helps us to characterize deception according to real patterns that play out in poker, but also, again, irl. Most people deceive with standard poker bluffs, making a bet that requires others to 'fold' to win. If they are called, then their deception is revealed, just like in poker. But 'slow-playing,' 'playing fast,' and 'check-raising' are also poker tropes, patterns of deception, that appear irl. 'Slow playing,' for example, is when a player has a strong hand, and wants to get as many chips into the pot from other players as possible, so as not to scare them away with aggressive betting, and instead they place smaller bets, to entice players with medium strong hands, or those on draws, to remain in the hand, but to pay a price for it. A price that the slow-player, with a strong hand, hopes to win at the end of the hand.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    It started with dog racing for me. I realized that if I bought a book in advance and wasn't greedy I could routinely have a night out with excellent food and drink for free, that it wasn't all that hard to win modestly at the track if you were serious and prepared. Then I decided to expand the observation and the larger realization came to me.
    It's like stock picking, or just general investment. You examine the situation, gather the facts, and assign something like pot odds, the cost/benefit analysis, and place your bets accordingly.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    I don't see making the SB as being decisive. I mean, only one qb in the history of the game has led a team to 4 consecutively and no one begins to put him into the conversation.
    Well, Kelly and Montana only reached the championship game four times each. Results were stunningly different, but the fact remains. And it also remains that Brady's reached eight.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    And who argues Bill Russell is the NBA GOAT? No one, really, though he has more rings than anyone in the history of his sport or any other.
    Apples and oranges, really. No position in all sports is parallel to football's quarterback. You can make an argument that soccer's and hockey's goalie, and if starting pitchers in baseball could pitch each game then them, are close, but there's nothing like football's quarterback position in basketball. No other single position influences the wins and losses like the QB. Confer Joe Montana.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    The value of the SB for me is what you do when you get there. Montana is untouched in that regard. Brady, let's be honest. The first ring he wasn't really good in the game and the first three were delivered by his future HOF kicker.
    Vinitieri's biggest impact was in the AFC championship game against Oakland in the 2001 season. He had to kick it off a snowy, sloppy field, from far enough away to make it interesting. His other kicks were clutch, but that's not entirely unusual in the NFL. There've been far tougher kicks made by other kickers in the intervening years, ones that were far longer than any of Vinitieri's clutch kicks.

    And we all know that kickers don't get the line of scrimmage to within their range. That takes an offense, run by a QB.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    We've seen him go into SBs and lose while fielding history making offenses in terms of production.
    Once.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    He lost with Randy Moss on board. So let's stop the does more with less at that point.
    I'm not arguing that point.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    And he won a couple of those rings with head scratchers. An errant pass by Seattle, a historic second half collapse by Atlanta.
    Games are 60 minutes long.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    I'd argue that at least three different qbs from his era are better and would have, with the level of coaching and stability within the organization done better by New England fans.
    Brady himself said that Rodgers could have done more than him in NE.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    Brady goes down for a season and the back up wins almost as many games
    Didn't win the AFC East, and didn't qualify for the playoffs too.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    before getting a big contract with KC that his play never justified again. Bill and company have a system. It's a bit like moneyball. A few flashpoints and a qb who can do just about anything you need done. It works. And more, Tom turned out to be legitimately great at the position. But Tom isn't Rodgers. He isn't Manning in his prime (no, not Eli, even though the lesser Manning has his number) and he arguably isn't Brees.

    I suspect history will approach the current given a bit differently. And it should.


    Joe Cool. Undefeated AND won half of his rings without Rice (people forget that).
    That Brady's got national broadcast announcers talking about him as the GOAT ain't hay. He's forced the argument, even if the right answer is Montana. That ain't hay.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    Then I'm content.


    I suspect we understand the thrust of the thing, all of us, which is our reconciliation to God in Christ and through his sacrifice, by which men receive grace and should live out their lives in love and gratitude, taking their pleasure where He finds it and being mindful of our failure to find it alone.


    I'm mostly color blind, but I love sunsets. Some may feel that I'm cheated of a larger thing, but I never have.

    And you'd think if it that was an advantage you wouldn't be so in the hole between us, rep giving unto others wise. Okay, no, but you have to admit it's funny though.
    Are you talking about TOL rep giving?
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    And who could fault that? (no, squeaky, it's rhetorical)

    You know the squeak, I hope.


    You think people see an empty cross and think, "Plus what?"
    No, just that Protestants protesting Catholics displaying the crucifix are protesting the Bible.
    Originally posted by Town Heretic View Post
    And there's always a crowd at supper.


    Well, that has gravity (either).
    I'm sucking on a wad of tobacco compost right now.

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