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Bible Study - the Book of Job

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  • [QUOTE=Tambora;3379623]
    It’s easy to kick a person while they’re down.
    Gypsies, tramps, and thieves that live safely in their homes think that God cannot see them or harm them for what they do.


    How did gypsies and tramps get into this?



    LA
    My theology is that the elect of Israel became the scattered church among the nations, and when filled up with the full number of gentiles who believe to become one with them, then Christ will return and gather them, and God will then pour out His wrath on the unbelievers of both Jew and Gentile.

    Comment


    • Job was upright and blameless before God, because he walked with God. We are to become partakers of the divine nature. We are to be conformed into the image of his Son.
      Job.29
      [1] And Job again took up his discourse, and said:
      [2] "Oh, that I were as in the months of old,
      as in the days when God watched over me;
      [3] when his lamp shone upon my head,
      and by his light I walked through darkness;
      [4] as I was in my autumn days,
      when the friendship of God was upon my tent;
      [5] when the Almighty was yet with me,
      Job was not lying as he was accused of earlier in the book. He truly walked with God. Satan said, "Have you not put a hedge of protection around Job?"
      when my children were about me;
      [6] when my steps were washed with milk,
      and the rock poured out for me streams of oil!
      [7] When I went out to the gate of the city,
      when I prepared my seat in the square,
      [8] the young men saw me and withdrew,
      and the aged rose and stood;
      [9] the princes refrained from talking,
      and laid their hand on their mouth;
      [10] the voice of the nobles was hushed,
      and their tongue cleaved to the roof of their mouth.
      Job silenced the mouths of the wicked and the unjust with his presence. The aged stood up for Job as he passed, because he walked with God.
      [11] When the ear heard, it called me blessed,
      and when the eye saw, it approved;
      [12] because I delivered the poor who cried,
      and the fatherless who had none to help him.
      [13] The blessing of him who was about to perish came upon me,
      and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
      [14] I put on righteousness, and it clothed me;
      my justice was like a robe and a turban.
      [15] I was eyes to the blind,
      and feet to the lame.
      [16] I was a father to the poor,
      and I searched out the cause of him whom I did not know.
      Job supported the poor. Job led the blind where to go. Job put on righteousness which is the garment of salvation or the righteous acts of the saints. He visited the terminally ill, and he looked after widows.
      21] "Men listened to me, and waited,
      and kept silence for my counsel.
      [22] After I spoke they did not speak again,
      and my word dropped upon them.
      [23] They waited for me as for the rain;
      and they opened their mouths as for the spring rain.
      [24] I smiled on them when they had no confidence;
      and the light of my countenance they did not cast down.
      [25] I chose their way, and sat as chief,
      and I dwelt like a king among his troops,
      like one who comforts mourners.


      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Comment


      • Chapter 13

        Job continues in his distress.

        Are the friends speaking any truth that Job does not already know?

        Job 13 KJV
        (1) Lo, mine eye hath seen all this, mine ear hath heard and understood it.
        (2) What ye know, the same do I know also: I am not inferior unto you.


        .
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        Is it best to rely on the words of man, or the words of God ?
        "Let God be true, but every man a liar."
        Job would rather argue his case with the infallible God, rather than fallible men. Because these guys were telling some truth, but not the whole truth.
        Mainly because they had no clue what the cause of Job's affliction was, so they were making assumptions. Wrong assumptions! And Job knew they were wrong assumptions.

        (3) Surely I would speak to the Almighty, and I desire to reason with God.

        (4) But ye are forgers of lies, ye are all physicians of no value.
        (5) O that ye would altogether hold your peace! and it should be your wisdom.
        (6) Hear now my reasoning, and hearken to the pleadings of my lips.
        (7) Will ye speak wickedly for God? and talk deceitfully for him?
        (8) Will ye accept his person? will ye contend for God?
        (9) Is it good that he should search you out? or as one man mocketh another, do ye so mock him?







        Showing partiality is a no-no!
        To assume that one that is being afflicted is always due to God's displeasure of that person, is just that ----- assumption.
        God will rebuke those that make false assumptions, by calling evil good and good evil.

        And Job throws back what Eliphaz said (Job 4:17-21) in his face!

        (10) He will surely reprove you, if ye do secretly accept persons.
        (11) Shall not his excellency make you afraid? and his dread fall upon you?
        (12) Your remembrances are like unto ashes, your bodies to bodies of clay.


        .
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        Job tells the friends to hold their tongue and let him speak.
        He will trust in the Lord no matter what his current situation is.
        Because he knows he has not forsaken God. Job puts his trust in the only one that can give him salvation.
        (13) Hold your peace, let me alone, that I may speak, and let come on me what will.
        (14) Wherefore do I take my flesh in my teeth, and put my life in mine hand?
        (15) Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him.
        (16) He also shall be my salvation: for an hypocrite shall not come before him.
        (17) Hear diligently my speech, and my declaration with your ears.
        (18) Behold now, I have ordered my cause; I know that I shall be justified.
        .
        .
        .
        .
        .
        Job ask God to plead his case face to face.
        Job asks for two things so he can do this.
        1. Take away the affliction for a time so he can be focused on his case instead of the pain.
        2. Take away the terror ----- ie. the terror of God when one sees Him.

        (19) Who is he that will plead with me? for now, if I hold my tongue, I shall give up the ghost.
        (20) Only do not two things unto me: then will I not hide myself from thee.
        (21) Withdraw thine hand far from me: and let not thy dread make me afraid.
        (22) Then call thou, and I will answer: or let me speak, and answer thou me.
        .
        .
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        Job wants to know WHY God is doing this to him.
        (Remember, Job does not know that it is Satan, not God, causing his affliction.)
        Even though Job trusts completely in God, he still wants to know why God seems to have left him alone.

        How many of us do the same when we are going through tough times?
        Do we not also cry out to God that it seems He has left us to suffer?
        "Why me , Lord? Why, why why?"
        It's natural, and even a reasonable assumption; because scripture tells of plenty of instances when God did cause some to suffer.

        But the story of Job should make us realize that not all reasonable assumptions are the truth of the matter.

        (23) How many are mine iniquities and sins? make me to know my transgression and my sin.
        (24) Wherefore hidest thou thy face, and holdest me for thine enemy?
        (25) Wilt thou break a leaf driven to and fro? and wilt thou pursue the dry stubble?
        (26) For thou writest bitter things against me, and makest me to possess the iniquities of my youth.
        (27) Thou puttest my feet also in the stocks, and lookest narrowly unto all my paths; thou settest a print upon the heels of my feet.
        (28) And he, as a rotten thing, consumeth, as a garment that is moth eaten.
















        We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
        They already know monsters exist.
        We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

        Comment


        • I knew Job would not be forsaken.....
          One lavished upon in the Beloved
          sigpic

          Comment


          • Hmmm, 10 pages in, eh?

            Here's a bit to chew on:

            Job 1:21 - And Job said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb and naked shall I return thither.

            Obviously Job was not going to re-enter his mother's womb, right? So then why is his death described as a return to his mother's womb? Why didn't he say, Naked was I born and naked shall I die? Well, may I suggest that, to an author who knows about preconception existence, who is writing a book about suffering (but not for sin committed during this life since Job was characterized as : “There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.”) this is a very poetic, secretive way of describing death, that is, our return to the state we were in before we were given life.

            Now, a return to the state one was in before one was born or given life can mean only one of two things: either annihilation or preconception existence. Well, since I do not believe that Job's author thought that death meant annihilation, I am not really left with much choice. There is only one rational answer left... Now, what do you think about that? Pretty surprising eh!

            Peace, Ted
            I Champion GOD’s holiness:
            - GOD did not need evil so did not create evil for any reason.
            - All evil is creature-created.

            I Champion Our Free will:
            - All spirits created in HIS image had an equal ability and opportunity to choose either heaven or hell by their free will.

            Comment


            • Job wants to speak with God.
              He knows it is an unbalanced duo for mere man to be in the presence of perfection. But still, Job desires to meet his creator.

              Job's mood swings between despair and hope.
              One moment crying out, "God, please take this tribulation from me".
              And the next moment whispering, "No matter what, your will be done".
              Reminiscent of Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane.
              Christ was in severe agony.
              "Father, if it be possible, please take this from me. But not my will, but yours be done".

              Job continues his dialogue:

              Job 14 KJV
              (1) Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble.
              (2) He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down: he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not.
              Remember the old saying, "Life is tough, and then you die" ?
              Now you know where it really originated!

              .
              .
              .
              .
              .





              (3) And dost thou open thine eyes upon such an one, and bringest me into judgment with thee?
              (4) Who can bring a clean thing out of an unclean? not one.

              When a holy God looks upon man that are all sinners, what could be forthcoming but judgment?

              .
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              .
              .

              Next, Job compares the body of man to that of a tree.
              The body grows old and withers and returns to the ground (hidden where none can see it).
              A tree can wither and even be cut down, yet the root remains hidden in the ground, and the tree can sprout back to life with a little water.
              It's the root that gives the tree life.

              I find this perspective of Job to be very interesting, since in the NT we learn that Christ is the root that supports life to the tree with living water.
              And if you are not in that tree supported by the root that has the living water, your life will not be renewed.

              While Job lived long before Jesus was born, somehow he knew the concept of his life being renewed after he lay hidden in the ground for a while.

              (5) Seeing his days are determined, the number of his months are with thee, thou hast appointed his bounds that he cannot pass;
              (6) Turn from him, that he may rest, till he shall accomplish, as an hireling, his day.
              (7) For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease.
              (8) Though the root thereof wax old in the earth, and the stock thereof die in the ground;
              (9) Yet through the scent of water it will bud, and bring forth boughs like a plant.
              (10) But man dieth, and wasteth away: yea, man giveth up the ghost, and where is he?
              (11) As the waters fail from the sea, and the flood decayeth and drieth up:
              (12) So man lieth down, and riseth not: till the heavens be no more, they shall not awake, nor be raised out of their sleep.
              (13) O that thou wouldest hide me in the grave, that thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past, that thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!
              (14) If a man die, shall he live again? all the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.
              (15) Thou shalt call, and I will answer thee: thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine hands.
              .
              .
              .
              .
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              (16) For now thou numberest my steps: dost thou not watch over my sin?
              (17) My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and thou sewest up mine iniquity.
              The poetic use of the Hebrew language is very visual.
              In verse 17 this poetic language describes what God will do with all of Job's sin/transgression.
              God will pack it away in a container and seal it up tight. Out of sight, no longer to be seen.
              It's not just a covering up of Job's transgression, it is totally packing it away out of sight in a container
              where it remains sealed up and cannot escape to ever bother you again.
              Those babies are gone!!!!!!


              .
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              (18) And surely the mountain falling cometh to nought, and the rock is removed out of his place.
              (19) The waters wear the stones: thou washest away the things which grow out of the dust of the earth; and thou destroyest the hope of man.
              Job describes that even the mighty mountains will eventually decay. And if those mighty rock hard mountains decay and erode away, what hope does the frail flesh of man have?

              .
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              (20) Thou prevailest for ever against him, and he passeth: thou changest his countenance, and sendest him away.
              (21) His sons come to honour, and he knoweth it not; and they are brought low, but he perceiveth it not of them.
              (22) But his flesh upon him shall have pain, and his soul within him shall mourn.
              Your children might become great men (as Job once was), or they might be humiliated and afflicted (as Job is now).
              Once one is lying in the grave, you know nothing of what the living are doing.
              But while you are living, you will experience some pain, and at times your soul will mourn.
              Such is the consequence of living in a fallen world.



              So grieve in times of despair, and dance in times of joy.







              We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
              They already know monsters exist.
              We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

              Comment


              • Bump for discussion.
                Jesus saves completely. http://www.climatedepot.com/ http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/

                Titus 1

                For there are many insubordinate, both idle talkers and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision, whose mouths must be stopped

                Ephesians 5

                11 And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather expose them. 12 For it is shameful even to speak of those things which are done by them in secret

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Nick M View Post
                  Bump for discussion.
                  Thanks, Nick.
                  I plan to continue.
                  But at the moment I am very limited with internet time.

                  We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
                  They already know monsters exist.
                  We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by ttruscott View Post
                    Hmmm, 10 pages in, eh?

                    Here's a bit to chew on:

                    Job 1:21 - And Job said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb and naked shall I return thither.

                    Obviously Job was not going to re-enter his mother's womb, right? So then why is his death described as a return to his mother's womb? Why didn't he say, Naked was I born and naked shall I die? Well, may I suggest that, to an author who knows about preconception existence, who is writing a book about suffering (but not for sin committed during this life since Job was characterized as : “There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.”) this is a very poetic, secretive way of describing death, that is, our return to the state we were in before we were given life.

                    Now, a return to the state one was in before one was born or given life can mean only one of two things: either annihilation or preconception existence. Well, since I do not believe that Job's author thought that death meant annihilation, I am not really left with much choice. There is only one rational answer left... Now, what do you think about that? Pretty surprising eh!

                    Peace, Ted
                    Thats very interesting indeed.To me it screams of Jobs character that he submits to the will of God in recognizing that all of his Earthly possessions, even his very life mean nothing.Even the hair on his head.

                    I am sure we have all heard the term, "I came into this world alone and I am leaving alone"

                    I personally think this is what Job was saying.The cattle, the lands even the family and hair on his body is nothing in the sight of God.
                    It is very humbling. And I would think it pleased God very much.
                    On that note I do not claim to know the mind of God.

                    Very awesome study Tambora and thank you Nick M for leading me here.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Tambora View Post
                      But at the moment I am very limited with internet time.
                      He was brought up in another thread.
                      Jesus saves completely. http://www.climatedepot.com/ http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/

                      Titus 1

                      For there are many insubordinate, both idle talkers and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision, whose mouths must be stopped

                      Ephesians 5

                      11 And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather expose them. 12 For it is shameful even to speak of those things which are done by them in secret

                      Comment


                      • bump (getting ready to work on this some more)

                        We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
                        They already know monsters exist.
                        We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

                        Comment


                        • chapter 15

                          Eliphaz chimes in again.

                          Job 15
                          (1) Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,
                          (2) Should a wise man utter vain knowledge, and fill his belly with the east wind?
                          "I thought you to be a wise man, Job; but it turns outs that you are just full of hot air!"

                          (3) Should he reason with unprofitable talk? or with speeches wherewith he can do no good?
                          (4) Yea, thou castest off fear, and restrainest prayer before God.
                          Just more belittling of Job by his so-called friend that came to "comfort" him in his time of woe.

                          (5) For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity, and thou choosest the tongue of the crafty.
                          (6) Thine own mouth condemneth thee, and not I: yea, thine own lips testify against thee.
                          Job has maintained that he has done nothing wrong to deserve the pain and hardship that has fallen upon him.
                          We know from the first couple of chapters that it is because of Job's righteousness (not his sinfulness) that Satan wished to attack him.

                          Eliphaz doesn't want to believe that a righteous person can suffer.
                          He believes Job's suffering MUST be because of sin, not righteousness.
                          The very fact that Job maintains that he is righteous infuriates Eliphaz!
                          He decrees that Job's own words of his righteousness condemn him as a liar.

                          How many of us have had those same thoughts at times ---- that if things are going good, then God must be blessing us; but if things are going badly, then God must be punishing us?

                          Let this be a lesson to all. You cannot spot a righteous man by how good things are going in his life.

                          And let it show that all those prosperity preachers are frauds for teaching such.
                          They are not doing anything but helping Satan convince you that God is mad at you if things are not going well.
                          Don't believe it for a second!!!!!


                          Stick around. Eliphaz has more accusations against a righteous man.
                          And he uses some speech that is scriptural (but out of context) to show that Job must see himself as a sinner, not a righteous man.

                          To be continued .....

                          We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
                          They already know monsters exist.
                          We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

                          Comment


                          • Eliphaz continues with his condemnation of Job.
                            The first time Eliphaz spoke, he sorta eased into his condemnation.
                            But now the fangs have emerged.

                            It is not his theology that is wrong, for it has merit .... in general.
                            But it is misdirected.

                            And even though he maintains that Job's misery has happened because of some wicked thing Job has done, he still cannot point to any specific thing Job had done wrong!
                            So, he accuses Job of doing some wicked thing on the sly, under the table, in secret. And he insists that Job must come clean and repent of that wicked deed he did.

                            But we know that Job had nothing to come clean about.

                            See if you can spot his correct theology about the common overall nature of man, although misdirected toward Job's situation.

                            Job 15
                            (7) Art thou the first man that was born? or wast thou made before the hills?
                            (8) Hast thou heard the secret of God? and dost thou restrain wisdom to thyself?
                            (9) What knowest thou, that we know not? what understandest thou, which is not in us?
                            Eliphaz points out that Job is not wiser than his friends. They all know the theology. They have the same wisdom in that regard. Job does not have any "secret" knowledge that they do not have.

                            (10) With us are both the grayheaded and very aged men, much elder than thy father.
                            This could be an indication that Job's friends are much older than he.

                            (11) Are the consolations of God small with thee? is there any secret thing with thee?
                            (12) Why doth thine heart carry thee away? and what do thy eyes wink at,
                            (13) That thou turnest thy spirit against God, and lettest such words go out of thy mouth?
                            (14) What is man, that he should be clean? and he which is born of a woman, that he should be righteous?
                            (15) Behold, he putteth no trust in his saints; yea, the heavens are not clean in his sight.
                            (16) How much more abominable and filthy is man, which drinketh iniquity like water?
                            Theologically correct, in general.
                            If Job's misery were because of the common fallen nature of man, then even Eliphaz would be guilty. But Eliphaz does not declare himself guilty.
                            No, instead, he is accusing Job of some phantom wicked deed he has committed (even thought he can't say what it is).

                            (17) I will shew thee, hear me; and that which I have seen I will declare;
                            (18) Which wise men have told from their fathers, and have not hid it:
                            (19) Unto whom alone the earth was given, and no stranger passed among them.
                            (20) The wicked man travaileth with pain all his days, and the number of years is hidden to the oppressor.
                            (21) A dreadful sound is in his ears: in prosperity the destroyer shall come upon him.
                            (22) He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness, and he is waited for of the sword.
                            (23) He wandereth abroad for bread, saying, Where is it? he knoweth that the day of darkness is ready at his hand.
                            (24) Trouble and anguish shall make him afraid; they shall prevail against him, as a king ready to the battle.
                            (25) For he stretcheth out his hand against God, and strengtheneth himself against the Almighty.
                            (26) He runneth upon him, even on his neck, upon the thick bosses of his bucklers:
                            (27) Because he covereth his face with his fatness, and maketh collops of fat on his flanks.
                            (28) And he dwelleth in desolate cities, and in houses which no man inhabiteth, which are ready to become heaps.
                            (29) He shall not be rich, neither shall his substance continue, neither shall he prolong the perfection thereof upon the earth.
                            (30) He shall not depart out of darkness; the flame shall dry up his branches, and by the breath of his mouth shall he go away.
                            (31) Let not him that is deceived trust in vanity: for vanity shall be his recompence.
                            (32) It shall be accomplished before his time, and his branch shall not be green.
                            (33) He shall shake off his unripe grape as the vine, and shall cast off his flower as the olive.
                            (34) For the congregation of hypocrites shall be desolate, and fire shall consume the tabernacles of bribery.
                            (35) They conceive mischief, and bring forth vanity, and their belly prepareth deceit.

                            Same stuff over and over again, but no specific wicked deed of Job.
                            His demeanor is becoming nasty toward Job, for he thinks that Job has done something wicked and refuses to admit it.
                            The gist of Eliphaz's argument is that Job is being punished, and God only punishes for wickedness, therefore Job must have done something wicked.

                            The phrase "innocent until proven guilty" seems to be a foreign concept to Eliphaz.

                            We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
                            They already know monsters exist.
                            We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

                            Comment


                            • chapter 16

                              Job replies ....
                              Job 16
                              (1) Then Job answered and said,
                              (2) I have heard many such things: miserable comforters are ye all.
                              (3) Shall vain words have an end? or what emboldeneth thee that thou answerest?

                              As Job wishes his suffering would end, so also he wishes his friend's words would end. For their words were only adding to his grief.




                              (4) I also could speak as ye do: if your soul were in my soul's stead, I could heap up words against you, and shake mine head at you.
                              (5) But I would strengthen you with my mouth, and the moving of my lips should asswage your grief.
                              Job has lost his home, his children, his income, and his health.

                              How should "friends" respond?

                              Did his "friends" offer to take Job into their home, to comfort and take care of him?
                              No. They left him on the outskirts of town where they dump their trash.
                              And they only come to him to accuse him of some imaginary sin.

                              Job has no recourse.
                              He's too poor and too sick to help himself.





                              (6) Though I speak, my grief is not asswaged: and though I forbear, what am I eased?
                              Whether he complains or silently accepts his situation, his pain and grief are still present.




                              Now, Job describes his suffering.
                              (7) But now he hath made me weary: thou hast made desolate all my company.
                              (8) And thou hast filled me with wrinkles, which is a witness against me: and my leanness rising up in me beareth witness to my face.
                              (9) He teareth me in his wrath, who hateth me: he gnasheth upon me with his teeth; mine enemy sharpeneth his eyes upon me.
                              (10) They have gaped upon me with their mouth; they have smitten me upon the cheek reproachfully; they have gathered themselves together against me.
                              (11) God hath delivered me to the ungodly, and turned me over into the hands of the wicked.
                              (12) I was at ease, but he hath broken me asunder: he hath also taken me by my neck, and shaken me to pieces, and set me up for his mark.
                              (13) His archers compass me round about, he cleaveth my reins asunder, and doth not spare; he poureth out my gall upon the ground.
                              (14) He breaketh me with breach upon breach, he runneth upon me like a giant.
                              (15) I have sewed sackcloth upon my skin, and defiled my horn in the dust.
                              (16) My face is foul with weeping, and on my eyelids is the shadow of death;
                              (17) Not for any injustice in mine hands: also my prayer is pure.
                              He feels persecuted, his flesh torn to shreds, broken, slapped, and mocked.
                              And he endures it, knowing he is innocent of the crimes his friends enemies accuse him of.

                              Sound familiar? (Think of Christ on trial.)





                              (18) O earth, cover not thou my blood, and let my cry have no place.
                              (19) Also now, behold, my witness is in heaven, and my record is on high.
                              (20) My friends scorn me: but mine eye poureth out tears unto God.
                              What is Job's only comfort and hope?
                              God's witness.
                              While man reviles him, God is his witness that his accusers are wrong about him.

                              Friends should help each other.
                              But there is a limit to what friends can do. And yes, even your friends can assume things about you that are not true.
                              God is unlimited and He knows truth.

                              God is your true fortress.
                              Not your friends, not your family, not the government, not your wealth, not your health, etc.







                              (21) O that one might plead for a man with God, as a man pleadeth for his neighbour!
                              Job's hope is that there was someone to mediate between man and God. An advocate.

                              Job's hope would be answered in the person of Jesus Christ.






                              (22) When a few years are come, then I shall go the way whence I shall not return.
                              Job knows that man's days on earth are numbered. And he shall not return to the same condition as he now endures.
                              In this life there is tribulation, even for those who trust in the Lord.
                              But for those that trust in the Lord, the next life will be free of tribulation.

                              We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
                              They already know monsters exist.
                              We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

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                              • Originally posted by ttruscott View Post
                                Job 1:21 - And Job said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb and naked shall I return thither.

                                Obviously Job was not going to re-enter his mother's womb, right? So then why is his death described as a return to his mother's womb?
                                It's a play on words. Job came forth naked from his mother's womb and naked he would return to mother earth from whom the elements of every human comes.

                                It's poetic imagery.

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