When America wasn't sissified

chair

Well-known member
A curious tale: When I was a child in the US back in the 60's, my parents wouldn't let us play with toy guns. They weren't exactly pacifists- I think the trauma of WW2 had a lot to do with it. The years rolled by, and I did some army service in Israel. I remember my brother's shock when he saw me in uniform with a rifle (M16) headed back to reserve duty. A few more years rolled by, and we had a lot of terror attacks here (Israel)- my father offered to buy me a weapon.

Having said all that- I still don't own a weapon. There was a period when we lived on a kibbutz, and I had a weapon in the house, for guard duty. It was an old WW2 era Carbine (M1), non-automatic. It had the advantage of no automatic mode. As they said- if you make a mistake, it will be one bullet at a time.
 

ffreeloader

Well-known member
A curious tale: When I was a child in the US back in the 60's, my parents wouldn't let us play with toy guns. They weren't exactly pacifists- I think the trauma of WW2 had a lot to do with it. The years rolled by, and I did some army service in Israel. I remember my brother's shock when he saw me in uniform with a rifle (M16) headed back to reserve duty. A few more years rolled by, and we had a lot of terror attacks here (Israel)- my father offered to buy me a weapon.

Having said all that- I still don't own a weapon. There was a period when we lived on a kibbutz, and I had a weapon in the house, for guard duty. It was an old WW2 era Carbine (M1), non-automatic. It had the advantage of no automatic mode. As they said- if you make a mistake, it will be one bullet at a time.

When i was a kid I was taught how to handle guns safely. We regularly went out plinking with .22s. Both semi-automatic rifles and revolvers. Failure to pay attention to what you were doing and where your bullets might strike was a big no-no.
 

marke

Well-known member
A curious tale: When I was a child in the US back in the 60's, my parents wouldn't let us play with toy guns. They weren't exactly pacifists- I think the trauma of WW2 had a lot to do with it. The years rolled by, and I did some army service in Israel. I remember my brother's shock when he saw me in uniform with a rifle (M16) headed back to reserve duty. A few more years rolled by, and we had a lot of terror attacks here (Israel)- my father offered to buy me a weapon.

Having said all that- I still don't own a weapon. There was a period when we lived on a kibbutz, and I had a weapon in the house, for guard duty. It was an old WW2 era Carbine (M1), non-automatic. It had the advantage of no automatic mode. As they said- if you make a mistake, it will be one bullet at a time.
I bought my first unregistered pistol when I was 13. I also owned rifles and a couple of shotguns and shot them frequently in the woods around my house. So did my friends. Crime in our town was low compared to today when criminals are flourishing due to leftist political softness on crime.
 

Red Wave Rising

Well-known member
Temp Banned
I bought my first unregistered pistol when I was 13. I also owned rifles and a couple of shotguns and shot them frequently in the woods around my house. So did my friends. Crime in our town was low compared to today when criminals are flourishing due to leftist political softness on crime.

My dad bought us 22 rifles when we were little, like 4th grade.
 

Red Wave Rising

Well-known member
Temp Banned
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