Summit Clock Experiment 2.0: Time is Absolute

Lon

Active member
Prove it.
Pay attention Open Theists: Once you have something controlling God, like time, He is no longer God. Do you understand this?

Look, God has to be 'omni'.' Why? Because such is the definition of all powerful logically. Because the Bible declares God is Omipotent. It says He knows everything and it says that no thing (nothing) can contain Him.

Once anything can 'contain' God, then He is no longer omnipresent. Once anything can control God, He is no long "Almighty God" (time controls Him instead of Him controlling time). I don't think you people really understand this and you need to. Please turn off your brains no longer, not even for a pet doctrine that somehow makes you feel warm and fuzzy. It is nowhere in scripture despite Boyd or Sanders saying otherwise. They are/were both being foolish, if they ever get over this immaturity. It is lousy thinking.
 

JosephR

New member
Was Jesus "controlled" by time when He was on Earth?


While He was on this Earth He for the most part played by the rules of physics , for the most part. As in He aged, but then again He did not, walked on water and so forth.

The thing about it is He said, my kingdom is not of this world, and I think what he meant was diminsions, or spiritual . So in the next diminsion or the spiritual realm where physical matter , decay and the transfer of energy as we know it does not apply, do you think they experience time In any form or fashion as we do? I don't think so.

Jesus said I tell you things about the earth , or this diminsion, and you do not believe me, how can I tell you about the things of heaven, or the next diminsion.


Posted from the TOL App!
 

Nick M

Black Rifles Matter
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The thing about it is He said, my kingdom is not of this world, and I think what he meant was diminsions, or spiritual

No he didn't. And what was left off is very important for several things including his ministry to Israel.

36 Jesus answered, “My kingdom is not of this world. If My kingdom were of this world, My servants would fight, so that I should not be delivered to the Jews; but now My kingdom is not from here.”

Why say "but now"?
 

Nick M

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http://www.npr.org/2013/08/22/214186448/the-worlds-most-precise-clock-could-prove-einstein-wrong

Einstein also predicted that clocks in different gravitational fields would tick at different speeds. For example, a clock in Boulder, Colo., which is a mile above sea level, would feel a slightly weaker gravitational pull than a clock at sea level in Washington, D.C. As a result, it would tick just a bit faster — and after 200,000 years it would be a full second ahead.

In his prediction, was it because of time dilation, or gravity changing the mechanics of the clock?
 

gcthomas

New member
No answer to the question? Did he predict for gravity effecting clocks, or time dilation from gravity? Which was it.

Gravity affects all natural processes in exactly the same way. Clocks, molecular changes and chemical reactions, diffusion rates, atomic emission and absorption frequencies, nuclear decay rates, resonances, electrical oscillations, quartz movements...

If time doesn't govern the rate of everything happening, what does your conception of time do? How could you measure it?

If it can't be measured, what use is the concept?
 

Daedalean's_Sun

New member
http://www.npr.org/2013/08/22/214186448/the-worlds-most-precise-clock-could-prove-einstein-wrong

Einstein also predicted that clocks in different gravitational fields would tick at different speeds. For example, a clock in Boulder, Colo., which is a mile above sea level, would feel a slightly weaker gravitational pull than a clock at sea level in Washington, D.C. As a result, it would tick just a bit faster — and after 200,000 years it would be a full second ahead.

In his prediction, was it because of time dilation, or gravity changing the mechanics of the clock?

The one causes the other. There is no OR.

"That's not much of an effect, but it's big enough for most atomic clocks to measure. And Ludlow's clock can register the change in gravity across a single inch of elevation. That kind of sensitivity will allow scientists to test Einstein's theories with greater precision in the real world."
 

Nick M

Black Rifles Matter
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The one causes the other. There is no OR.

So gravity effects time (I know hard to say without laughing) and the clock just measures it. Guess what morons. If I altar the spring in scale and put a 5 lb weight on it, the weight is still 5 lbs. And the scale says otherwise. But it really does weigh 5 lbs.

Gravity affects all natural processes in exactly the same way. Clocks, molecular changes and chemical reactions, diffusion rates, atomic emission and absorption frequencies, nuclear decay rates, resonances, electrical oscillations, quartz movements...

This doesn't actually contribute to anything....thanks for the misdirection.

If time doesn't govern the rate of everything happening

What? You just said gravity does it. Gravity affects the natural process. And it does.

How could you measure it?

It used to be lunar cycles, but most use a solar cycle now. But to make up for inconsistency and the 1/4 day, we add a day every 4 years.

Retracting a tape measure doesn't change the length of a yard.
 

Nick M

Black Rifles Matter
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What is strange, I gave you the link and you didn't even read it. Here you go.

What a makes a good clock? Andrew Ludlow, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, says one of the most important criteria is stability.

"If you could imagine a grandfather clock and see the pendulum swinging back and forth, ideally that pendulum would swing back and forth very uniformly," Ludlow says. "Each swing would take exactly the same amount of time."

That's stability. But what if something perturbs the system, like a mischievous toddler?

"Imagine that toddler shaking the grandfather clock itself — that oscillation period could vary quite a bit," Ludlow says. "How much that ticking rate varies determines the precision with which you can measure the evolution of time."​

In other words, time dilation will appear to shrink. And in your fantasy land, you think time is physical and is changing the clock. Not the current in the watch and the consistent vibration of the quartz. It shouldn't matter if time is what moved the clock, and not the spring tension, current, or other mechanism.
 

Daedalean's_Sun

New member
What is strange, I gave you the link and you didn't even read it. Here you go.

What a makes a good clock? Andrew Ludlow, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, says one of the most important criteria is stability.

"If you could imagine a grandfather clock and see the pendulum swinging back and forth, ideally that pendulum would swing back and forth very uniformly," Ludlow says. "Each swing would take exactly the same amount of time."

That's stability. But what if something perturbs the system, like a mischievous toddler?

"Imagine that toddler shaking the grandfather clock itself — that oscillation period could vary quite a bit," Ludlow says. "How much that ticking rate varies determines the precision with which you can measure the evolution of time."​

In other words, time dilation will appear to shrink. And in your fantasy land, you think time is physical and is changing the clock. Not the current in the watch and the consistent vibration of the quartz. It shouldn't matter if time is what moved the clock, and not the spring tension, current, or other mechanism.

Perhaps you can clarify you objection for me. I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt in assuming you know that pendulum clocks are not the subject of experimentation here.

The effect of time dilation has been reproduced with both digital, and atomic clocks in various contexts, resulting in the same pattern.

A pattern that is very predictable as it turns out:

t = t0/(1-v2/c2)1/2

 

Stripe

Teenage Adaptive Ninja Turtle
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The effect of time dilation has been reproduced with both digital, and atomic clocks in various contexts, resulting in the same pattern. A pattern that is very predictable as it turns out

You know to what degree gravity will affect a clock and you think this is evidence against what Nick said? :AMR:
 
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