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  • ECT: You Must Work Out Your Salvation


    We Can Work It Out

    By Tim Staples - source link

    (Quoted with permission)
    James 2:24 is remarkably clear: "You see that a man is justified by works and not by faith alone." Yet millions of Christians teach the opposite: They claim that we are "justified by faith alone"—saying good works are unnecessary for Christians in the process of justification.

    This misconception is rooted in the misinterpretation of a few key texts, such as Romans 3:28: "For we hold that a man is justified by faith apart from works of law." Romans 4:5 is another: "And to one who does not work but trusts him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is reckoned as righteousness." On the surface, St. Paul seems to be saying works are not necessary for our justification or salvation in any sense, but that is not the case when we examine the context of these passages. Not only would this interpretation contradict the words of James 2, but it would also contradict Paul himself.

    Work in Christ

    Paul made very clear in Romans 2:6-8 that good works are necessary for attaining eternal life, at least for those capable of performing them: "For he will render to every man according to his works: to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life; but for those who are factious and do not obey the truth, but obey wickedness, there will be wrath and fury."

    So what about the fact that Paul also said we are "justified by faith apart from works of law?" He was writing to a church in Rome struggling with a very prominent first-century heretical sect known today as the "Judaizers." These heretics taught that belief in Christ and obedience to the New Covenant was not enough to be saved. A man also had to keep the Mosaic Law (which, according to Hebrews 7:11-12, has been superseded in Christ) and be circumcised in order to be saved (cf. Acts 15:1-2). Paul gave us one clue—among many—that he had this sect in mind when he wrote in Romans 2:28-29, "For he is not a real Jew who is one outwardly, nor is true circumcision something external and physical. He is a Jew who is one inwardly, and real circumcision is a matter of the heart, spiritual and not literal . . . " Paul told us in Colossians 2:11-12 that this true "circumcision of Christ" is baptism.

    It is in this context that Paul says we are "justified by faith apart from works of law." He did not in any sense say that works are unnecessary. He specified works of law because these were the works without which the Judaizers were claiming one "cannot be saved."

    Paul does not specifically say works of law in Romans 4:5, but if we read from Romans 3:28 to Romans 4:5 and beyond, the context makes it unmistakable: Paul was referring to circumcision in particular and the same "works of law" he was referring to in Romans 3:28. Romans 4:5-10 will suffice to make the point:
    And to one who does not work but trusts him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is reckoned as righteousness . . . Is this blessing pronounced only upon the circumcised, or also upon the uncircumcised? We say that faith was reckoned to Abraham as righteousness. How then was it reckoned to him? Was it before or after he had been circumcised? It was not after, but before he was circumcised.

    Paul used the example of the "Judaizers" to teach the truth about the nature of justification and works. The works that justify us—as we saw in Romans 2:6-11 and James 2:24—are works done in Christ. Indeed, in Romans 2:4, before Paul even begins to talk about the works we must do to be saved, he says, "Knowest thou not, that the benignity of God leadeth thee to penance" (Douay-Rheims). It is only God’s goodness that leads us to repentance so that we can perform good works. How do we get "in Christ" according to Paul? Through baptism: "Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death . . ." (Rom 6:3-4). It is only after we are in Christ and trusting in the power of his grace at work within us that we have the power to remain in him: "Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through him we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand and we rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God" (Rom 5:1-2).

    Moreover, in Romans 6:16, Paul tells us that after baptism, obedience to Christ leads us to justification while sin will lead us to death (see also Romans 6:23): "Do you not know that if you yield yourselves to any one as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness" (Gk. eis dikaiosunen, unto justification).

    Paul’s emphasis is not just on good works, but works done in and through the power of Christ. Thus, in Romans 8:1-14,Paul tells us in no uncertain terms that we must be in Christ in order to do works that please God.
    There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus . . . who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit . . . and those who are in the flesh cannot please God . . . So, then, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh—for if you live according to the flesh you will die, but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body you will live. For all who are led by the Spirit of God are the sons of God.

    Remember that Paul is emphasizing our continuing in Christ, in his grace or "kindness" as he says in Romans 11:22. "Note then the kindness and severity of God: severity toward those who have fallen, but God’s kindness to you, provided you continue in his kindness; otherwise you too will be cut off."

    Work through Love

    When Paul wrote his letter to the Galatians, he had these same "Judaizers" in mind:
    Let me ask you only this: Did you receive the Spirit by works of the law, or by hearing with faith? Are you so foolish? Having begun with the Spirit, are you now ending with the flesh . . . Now I Paul say to you that if you receive circumcision, Christ will be of no advantage to you. I testify again to every man who receives circumcision that he is bound to keep the whole law. You are severed from Christ, you who would be justified by the law; you have fallen away from grace. For through the Spirit, by faith, we wait for the hope of righteousness (Gk. dikaiosoune, justification). For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision is of any avail, but faith working through love. (Gal 3:2-3, 5:2-6)

    Evidently, some of the Galatians were giving in to the false teaching that commanded them to return to the Law of Moses for salvation. He warns them that returning to the old Law is to reject Christ. But he in no way even hints at any idea of a "justification by faith alone" that would deny the necessity of "faith working through love." Paul writes in the simplest of terms, in Galatians 5:19-21 and 6:7-9, that if Christians allow themselves to be dominated by their "flesh," or lower nature, they will not make it to heaven. While on the flip side, Christians will only reap the reward of eternal life if they continue to "sow to the Spirit" or perform good works:
    Now the works of the flesh are plain: immorality, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry, sorcery, enmity, strife, jealousy, anger, selfishness, dissension, party spirit, envy, drunkenness, carousing and the like. I warn you, as I warned you before, that those who do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God . . . Do not be deceived; God is not mocked, for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap. For he who sows to his own flesh will from the flesh reap corruption (eternal death); but he who sows to the Spirit will from the Spirit reap eternal life. And let us not grow weary in well-doing, for in due season we shall reap, if we do not lose heart.

    Work out Salvation

    Ephesians 2:8-9 declares: "For by grace you have been saved through faith; and this is not your own doing, it is the gift of God—not because of works, lest any man should boast." This is another text commonly used to dismiss good works as necessary for salvation in the life of a Christian. However, once again, context is the key to understanding Paul. In verses 4-6, he says: "But God, who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ . . . and raised us up with him . . ."

    Context reveals that St. Paul was talking about the initial grace of salvation or justification by which we are raised from death unto life. The construction of the Greek text of Ephesians 2:8-9 makes clear that both grace and faith are entirely unmerited. Many Protestants are shocked to discover this is precisely what the Catholic Church teaches—and baptizes babies to prove it. How much more can the Church do to demonstrate this truth? What kind of works could a newborn baby have done to merit anything? However, once that baby grows up and reaches the age of accountability, he must begin to "work out [his] own salvation with fear and trembling; for God is at work in [him], both to will and to work for his good pleasure" (Phil 2:12-13). Or, as Paul says in Ephesians 2:10: "For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them."

    Are we justified or saved by faith, according to Jesus? Certainly! But by faith alone that would exclude works in every sense? No way. In John 11:25, we read: "I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live." That is faith. Yet, in Matthew 19:17-19, Jesus declared: ". . . If you would enter life, keep the commandments . . . You shall not kill, you shall not commit adultery, you shall not steal, you shall not bear false witness, honor your father and mother, and, you shall love your neighbor as yourself." That is works.

    In Matthew 12:37, Jesus puts any thought of justification by faith alone to rest: ". . . for by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned."

    About Tim Staples:
    http://www.catholic.com/profiles/tim-staples

  • #2
    Originally posted by CatholicCrusader View Post

    We Can Work It Out

    By Tim Staples - source link

    (Quoted with permission)



    About Tim Staples:
    http://www.catholic.com/profiles/tim-staples
    False gospel. Staples is accursed lest he repents.
    "There is one thing worse than going to Hell. That would be going to Hell and having it be a surprise."
    Terence Mc Lean

    [most will be very surprised]


    Everyone who has not believed the Gospel of grace is not saved, no matter what else they believe or do.
    By that measure, how many professing Christians are on their way to the Lake of Fire?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by musterion View Post
      False gospel. Staples is accursed lest he repents.
      LOL. You're a funny guy.

      Comment


      • #4
        What Paul preached as good news because it's the power of God unto salvation is wrapped up in 1 Cor 15:1-4. The no-works-for-justification aspect is reiterated by him both in Eph 2:8-9, 2 Tim 1:9 and Titus 3:5...the very thing your church still has an official anathema against and which Staples denies. Of course you've been on TOL long enough to know this very well. But you still refuse to believe it. Not my problem.
        "There is one thing worse than going to Hell. That would be going to Hell and having it be a surprise."
        Terence Mc Lean

        [most will be very surprised]


        Everyone who has not believed the Gospel of grace is not saved, no matter what else they believe or do.
        By that measure, how many professing Christians are on their way to the Lake of Fire?

        Comment


        • #5
          "If ANYONE says that the sinner is justified by faith alone, meaning that nothing else is required to cooperate in order to obtain the grace of justification [works] ... let him be anathema" (Trent, Session 6: can. 9).
          Either that statement is true or Paul's statements cited above are true. Because they're contradictory and mutually exclusive, one of them is false. Indeed, Trent anathematized Paul, since he's an "anyone" who said exactly what Trent says is anathema.

          And you obey them.
          "There is one thing worse than going to Hell. That would be going to Hell and having it be a surprise."
          Terence Mc Lean

          [most will be very surprised]


          Everyone who has not believed the Gospel of grace is not saved, no matter what else they believe or do.
          By that measure, how many professing Christians are on their way to the Lake of Fire?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by musterion View Post
            .....The no-works-for-justification aspect is reiterated by him both in Eph 2:8-9, 2 Tim 1:9 and Titus 3:5....
            No it is not, and you are not balancing scriptures again other scriptures. You're POV represents a 500-year old man-made doctrine, accepted by only a small percentage of Christians.

            Paul was a former Pharisee, so when he spoke of works he usually referred to works of the law. Read it in context.

            The balance is, works of the law (i.e. Torah) cannot save, but works that Christ commanded can and do save.

            Furthermore, you should become familiar with the difference between "merit" and "earning". We do nor earn our salvation through works but wedo meritit. There is a difference.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CatholicCrusader View Post
              No it is not, and you are not balancing scriptures again other scriptures. You're POV represents a 500-year old man-made doctrine, accepted by only a small percentage of Christians.

              Paul was a former Pharisee, so when he spoke of works he usually referred to works of the law. Read it in context.

              The balance is, works of the law (i.e. Torah) cannot save, but works that Christ commanded can and do save.

              Furthermore, you should become familiar with the difference between "merit" and "earning". We do nor earn our salvation through works but wedo meritit. There is a difference.
              Reward and Merit
              source link

              Paul tells us: "For [God] will reward every man according to his works: to those who by perseverance in working good seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life. There will be . . . glory and honor and peace for every one who does good, the Jew first and also the Greek. For God shows no partiality" (Rom. 2:6–11; cf. Gal. 6:6–10).

              In the second century, the technical Latin term for "merit" was introduced as a synonym for the Greek word for "reward." Thus merit and reward are two sides of the same coin.

              Protestants often misunderstand the Catholic teaching on merit, thinking that Catholics believe that one must do good works to come to God and be saved. This is exactly the opposite of what the Church teaches. The Council of Trent stressed: "[N]one of those things which precede justification, whether faith or works, merit the grace of justification; for if it is by grace, it is not now by works; otherwise, as the Apostle [Paul] says, grace is no more grace" (Decree on Justification 8, citing Rom. 11:6).

              The Catholic Church teaches only Christ is capable of meriting in the strict sense—mere man cannot (Catechism of the Catholic Church 2007). The most merit humans can have is condign—when, under the impetus of God’s grace, they perform acts which please him and which he has promised to reward (Rom. 2:6–11, Gal. 6:6–10). Thus God’s grace and his promise form the foundation for all human merit (CCC 2008).

              Virtually all of this is agreed to by Protestants, who recognize that, under the impetus of God’s grace, Christians do perform acts which are pleasing to God and which God has promised to reward, meaning that they fit the definition of merit. When faced with this, Protestants are forced to admit the truth of the Catholic position—although, contrary to Paul’s command (2 Tim. 2:14), they may still dispute the terminology.

              Thus the Lutheran Book of Concord admits: "We are not putting forward an empty quibble about the term ‘reward.’ . . . We grant that eternal life is a reward because it is something that is owed—not because of our merits [in the strict sense] but because of the promise [of God]. We have shown above that justification is strictly a gift of God; it is a thing promised. To this gift the promise of eternal life has been added" (p. 162).

              The following passages illustrate what the Church Fathers had to say on the relationship between merit and grace.


              Ignatius of Antioch

              "Be pleasing to him whose soldiers you are, and whose pay you receive. May none of you be found to be a deserter. Let your baptism be your armament, your faith your helmet, your love your spear, your endurance your full suit of armor. Let your works be as your deposited withholdings, so that you may receive the back-pay which has accrued to you" (Letter to Polycarp 6:2 [A.D. 110]).


              Justin Martyr

              "We have learned from the prophets and we hold it as true that punishments and chastisements and good rewards are distributed according to the merit of each man’s actions. Were this not the case, and were all things to happen according to the decree of fate, there would be nothing at all in our power. If fate decrees that this man is to be good and that one wicked, then neither is the former to be praised nor the latter to be blamed" (First Apology 43 [A.D. 151]).


              Athenagoras

              "And we shall make no mistake in saying, that the [goal] of an intelligent life and rational judgment, is to be occupied uninterruptedly with those objects to which the natural reason is chiefly and primarily adapted, and to delight unceasingly in the contemplation of Him Who Is, and of his decrees, notwithstanding that the majority of men, because they are affected too passionately and too violently by things below, pass through life without attaining this object. For . . . the examination relates to individuals, and the reward or punishment of lives ill or well spent is proportioned to the merit of each" (The Resurrection of the Dead 25 [A.D. 178]).


              Theophilus of Antioch

              "He who gave the mouth for speech and formed the ears for hearing and made eyes for seeing will examine everything and will judge justly, granting recompense to each according to merit. To those who seek immortality by the patient exercise of good works [Rom. 2:7], he will give everlasting life, joy, peace, rest, and all good things, which neither eye has seen nor ear has heard, nor has it entered into the heart of man [1 Cor. 2:9]. For the unbelievers and the contemptuous and for those who do not submit to the truth but assent to iniquity . . . there will be wrath and indignation [Rom. 2:8]" (To Autolycus 1:14 [A.D. 181]).


              Irenaeus

              "[Paul], an able wrestler, urges us on in the struggle for immortality, so that we may receive a crown and so that we may regard as a precious crown that which we acquire by our own struggle and which does not grow upon us spontaneously. . . . Those things which come to us spontaneously are not loved as much as those which are obtained by anxious care" (Against Heresies4:37:7 [A.D. 189]).


              Tertullian

              "Again, we [Christians] affirm that a judgment has been ordained by God according to the merits of every man" (To the Nations 19 [A.D. 195]).

              "In former times the Jews enjoyed much of God’s favor, when the fathers of their race were noted for their righteousness and faith. So it was that as a people they flourished greatly, and their kingdom attained to a lofty eminence; and so highly blessed were they, that for their instruction God spoke to them in special revelations, pointing out to them beforehand how they should merit his favor and avoid his displeasure" (Apology 21 [A.D. 197]).

              "A good deed has God for its debtor [cf. Prov. 19:17], just as also an evil one; for a judge is the rewarder in every case [cf. Rom. 13:3–4]" (Repentance 2:11 [A.D. 203]).


              Hippolytus

              "Standing before [Christ’s] judgment, all of them, men, angels, and demons, crying out in one voice, shall say: ‘Just is your judgment,’ and the justice of that cry will be apparent in the recompense made to each. To those who have done well, everlasting enjoyment shall be given; while to lovers of evil shall be given eternal punishment" (Against the Greeks 3 [A.D. 212]).


              Cyprian of Carthage

              "The Lord denounces [Christian evildoers], and says, ‘Many shall say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in your name, and in your name have cast out devils, and in your name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, you who work iniquity’ [Matt. 7:21–23]. There is need of righteousness, that one may deserve well of God the Judge; we must obey his precepts and warnings, that our merits may receive their reward" (The Unity of the Catholic Church 15, 1st ed. [A.D. 251]).

              "[Y]ou who are a matron rich and wealthy, anoint not your eyes with the antimony of the devil, but with the collyrium of Christ, so that you may at last come to see God, when you have merited before God both by your works and by your manner of living" (Works and Almsgivings 14 [A.D. 253]).


              Cyril of Jerusalem

              "The root of every good work is the hope of the resurrection, for the expectation of a reward nerves the soul to good work. Every laborer is prepared to endure the toils if he looks forward to the reward of these toils" (Catechetical Lectures 18:1 [A.D. 350]).


              Jerome

              "It is our task, according to our different virtues, to prepare for ourselves different rewards. . . . If we were all going to be equal in heaven it would be useless for us to humble ourselves here in order to have a greater place there. . . . Why should virgins persevere? Why should widows toil? Why should married women be content? Let us all sin, and after we repent we shall be the same as the apostles are!" (Against Jovinian 2:32 [A.D. 393]).


              Augustine

              "We are commanded to live righteously, and the reward is set before us of our meriting to live happily in eternity. But who is able to live righteously and do good works unless he has been justified by faith?" (Various Questions to Simplician 1:2:21 [A.D. 396]).

              "He bestowed forgiveness; the crown he will pay out. Of forgiveness he is the donor; of the crown, he is the debtor. Why debtor? Did he receive something? . . . The Lord made himself a debtor not by receiving something but by promising something. One does not say to him, ‘Pay for what you received,’ but ‘Pay what you promised’" (Explanations of the Psalms 83:16 [A.D. 405]).

              "What merits of his own has the saved to boast of when, if he were dealt with according to his merits, he would be nothing if not damned? Have the just then no merits at all? Of course they do, for they are the just. But they had no merits by which they were made just" (Letters 194:3:6 [A.D. 412]).

              "What merit, then, does a man have before grace, by which he might receive grace, when our every good merit is produced in us only by grace and when God, crowning our merits, crowns nothing else but his own gifts to us?" (ibid., 194:5:19).

              Comment


              • #8
                It's very simple.

                We today cannot be both justifiable without works (as Paul taught) and, at the same time, be unjustifiable without works (as Roman Catholics believe).

                These are mutually exclusive and contradictory positions.

                They cannot both be true.

                One of them is wrong.

                No third option here.

                In order for Trent (and for YOU) to be correct, Paul has to be wrong. And vice versa.
                "There is one thing worse than going to Hell. That would be going to Hell and having it be a surprise."
                Terence Mc Lean

                [most will be very surprised]


                Everyone who has not believed the Gospel of grace is not saved, no matter what else they believe or do.
                By that measure, how many professing Christians are on their way to the Lake of Fire?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by musterion View Post
                  It's very simple............
                  Apparently it's not, otherwise you would not keep getting it wrong. As I said, you're POV represents a 500-year old man-made doctrine, accepted by only a small percentage of Christians. Mine represent's the 2,000 year-old faith delivered to the apostles by Christ.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What was posted here (in the spoiler) actually has its use

                    Spoiler


                    Originally posted by CatholicCrusader View Post
                    Reward and Merit
                    source link

                    Paul tells us: "For [God] will reward every man according to his works: to those who by perseverance in working good seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life. There will be . . . glory and honor and peace for every one who does good, the Jew first and also the Greek. For God shows no partiality" (Rom. 2:6–11; cf. Gal. 6:6–10).

                    In the second century, the technical Latin term for "merit" was introduced as a synonym for the Greek word for "reward." Thus merit and reward are two sides of the same coin.

                    Protestants often misunderstand the Catholic teaching on merit, thinking that Catholics believe that one must do good works to come to God and be saved. This is exactly the opposite of what the Church teaches. The Council of Trent stressed: "[N]one of those things which precede justification, whether faith or works, merit the grace of justification; for if it is by grace, it is not now by works; otherwise, as the Apostle [Paul] says, grace is no more grace" (Decree on Justification 8, citing Rom. 11:6).

                    The Catholic Church teaches only Christ is capable of meriting in the strict sense—mere man cannot (Catechism of the Catholic Church 2007). The most merit humans can have is condign—when, under the impetus of God’s grace, they perform acts which please him and which he has promised to reward (Rom. 2:6–11, Gal. 6:6–10). Thus God’s grace and his promise form the foundation for all human merit (CCC 2008).

                    Virtually all of this is agreed to by Protestants, who recognize that, under the impetus of God’s grace, Christians do perform acts which are pleasing to God and which God has promised to reward, meaning that they fit the definition of merit. When faced with this, Protestants are forced to admit the truth of the Catholic position—although, contrary to Paul’s command (2 Tim. 2:14), they may still dispute the terminology.

                    Thus the Lutheran Book of Concord admits: "We are not putting forward an empty quibble about the term ‘reward.’ . . . We grant that eternal life is a reward because it is something that is owed—not because of our merits [in the strict sense] but because of the promise [of God]. We have shown above that justification is strictly a gift of God; it is a thing promised. To this gift the promise of eternal life has been added" (p. 162).

                    The following passages illustrate what the Church Fathers had to say on the relationship between merit and grace.


                    Ignatius of Antioch

                    "Be pleasing to him whose soldiers you are, and whose pay you receive. May none of you be found to be a deserter. Let your baptism be your armament, your faith your helmet, your love your spear, your endurance your full suit of armor. Let your works be as your deposited withholdings, so that you may receive the back-pay which has accrued to you" (Letter to Polycarp 6:2 [A.D. 110]).


                    Justin Martyr

                    "We have learned from the prophets and we hold it as true that punishments and chastisements and good rewards are distributed according to the merit of each man’s actions. Were this not the case, and were all things to happen according to the decree of fate, there would be nothing at all in our power. If fate decrees that this man is to be good and that one wicked, then neither is the former to be praised nor the latter to be blamed" (First Apology 43 [A.D. 151]).


                    Athenagoras

                    "And we shall make no mistake in saying, that the [goal] of an intelligent life and rational judgment, is to be occupied uninterruptedly with those objects to which the natural reason is chiefly and primarily adapted, and to delight unceasingly in the contemplation of Him Who Is, and of his decrees, notwithstanding that the majority of men, because they are affected too passionately and too violently by things below, pass through life without attaining this object. For . . . the examination relates to individuals, and the reward or punishment of lives ill or well spent is proportioned to the merit of each" (The Resurrection of the Dead 25 [A.D. 178]).


                    Theophilus of Antioch

                    "He who gave the mouth for speech and formed the ears for hearing and made eyes for seeing will examine everything and will judge justly, granting recompense to each according to merit. To those who seek immortality by the patient exercise of good works [Rom. 2:7], he will give everlasting life, joy, peace, rest, and all good things, which neither eye has seen nor ear has heard, nor has it entered into the heart of man [1 Cor. 2:9]. For the unbelievers and the contemptuous and for those who do not submit to the truth but assent to iniquity . . . there will be wrath and indignation [Rom. 2:8]" (To Autolycus 1:14 [A.D. 181]).


                    Irenaeus

                    "[Paul], an able wrestler, urges us on in the struggle for immortality, so that we may receive a crown and so that we may regard as a precious crown that which we acquire by our own struggle and which does not grow upon us spontaneously. . . . Those things which come to us spontaneously are not loved as much as those which are obtained by anxious care" (Against Heresies4:37:7 [A.D. 189]).


                    Tertullian

                    "Again, we [Christians] affirm that a judgment has been ordained by God according to the merits of every man" (To the Nations 19 [A.D. 195]).

                    "In former times the Jews enjoyed much of God’s favor, when the fathers of their race were noted for their righteousness and faith. So it was that as a people they flourished greatly, and their kingdom attained to a lofty eminence; and so highly blessed were they, that for their instruction God spoke to them in special revelations, pointing out to them beforehand how they should merit his favor and avoid his displeasure" (Apology 21 [A.D. 197]).

                    "A good deed has God for its debtor [cf. Prov. 19:17], just as also an evil one; for a judge is the rewarder in every case [cf. Rom. 13:3–4]" (Repentance 2:11 [A.D. 203]).


                    Hippolytus

                    "Standing before [Christ’s] judgment, all of them, men, angels, and demons, crying out in one voice, shall say: ‘Just is your judgment,’ and the justice of that cry will be apparent in the recompense made to each. To those who have done well, everlasting enjoyment shall be given; while to lovers of evil shall be given eternal punishment" (Against the Greeks 3 [A.D. 212]).


                    Cyprian of Carthage

                    "The Lord denounces [Christian evildoers], and says, ‘Many shall say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in your name, and in your name have cast out devils, and in your name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, you who work iniquity’ [Matt. 7:21–23]. There is need of righteousness, that one may deserve well of God the Judge; we must obey his precepts and warnings, that our merits may receive their reward" (The Unity of the Catholic Church 15, 1st ed. [A.D. 251]).

                    "[Y]ou who are a matron rich and wealthy, anoint not your eyes with the antimony of the devil, but with the collyrium of Christ, so that you may at last come to see God, when you have merited before God both by your works and by your manner of living" (Works and Almsgivings 14 [A.D. 253]).


                    Cyril of Jerusalem

                    "The root of every good work is the hope of the resurrection, for the expectation of a reward nerves the soul to good work. Every laborer is prepared to endure the toils if he looks forward to the reward of these toils" (Catechetical Lectures 18:1 [A.D. 350]).


                    Jerome

                    "It is our task, according to our different virtues, to prepare for ourselves different rewards. . . . If we were all going to be equal in heaven it would be useless for us to humble ourselves here in order to have a greater place there. . . . Why should virgins persevere? Why should widows toil? Why should married women be content? Let us all sin, and after we repent we shall be the same as the apostles are!" (Against Jovinian 2:32 [A.D. 393]).


                    Augustine

                    "We are commanded to live righteously, and the reward is set before us of our meriting to live happily in eternity. But who is able to live righteously and do good works unless he has been justified by faith?" (Various Questions to Simplician 1:2:21 [A.D. 396]).

                    "He bestowed forgiveness; the crown he will pay out. Of forgiveness he is the donor; of the crown, he is the debtor. Why debtor? Did he receive something? . . . The Lord made himself a debtor not by receiving something but by promising something. One does not say to him, ‘Pay for what you received,’ but ‘Pay what you promised’" (Explanations of the Psalms 83:16 [A.D. 405]).

                    "What merits of his own has the saved to boast of when, if he were dealt with according to his merits, he would be nothing if not damned? Have the just then no merits at all? Of course they do, for they are the just. But they had no merits by which they were made just" (Letters 194:3:6 [A.D. 412]).

                    "What merit, then, does a man have before grace, by which he might receive grace, when our every good merit is produced in us only by grace and when God, crowning our merits, crowns nothing else but his own gifts to us?" (ibid., 194:5:19).


                    That use being...

                    ...thanks for proving by it what few Protestants know of their so called beloved ECF, due to their own and the tradition handed down to them through the endless books based nonsense of their leaders - that THE VAST MAJORITY of the so called "Early Church Fathers" (ECF) were anything but.

                    That they were lost men - in fact; outright heretics - who the true Protestant has no business going to for what the Scripture teaches.

                    Fact is; Martin Luther (who practically worshipped Augustine) and the so called Reformers, never did fully succeed in completely breaking away from the need to point to "the tradition of men" as one's means of concluding one's view is based on Scripture.

                    The Reformers ended up replacing an over emphasis on the error that tradition far too often proves to be; with their own practice of same.

                    The recovery of the blazing glory of light that is Faith Alone based on Scripture alone, soon giving way to the above, and with that; the stunting of any further light til many centuries later, when at last; some were once more sincerely questioning "the traditions of men" the Reformers had long since bogged down any further light under.

                    Fascinating this - an RC unwittingly unveiling the very error of both the RCC and of far too many Protestants...

                    2 Peter 1:19 We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts: 1:20 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. 1:21 For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ^ (will comment soon)

                      EDIT: Done. Post #14.
                      Last edited by CatholicCrusader; July 19th, 2016, 04:11 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CatholicCrusader View Post

                          We Can Work It Out

                          By Tim Staples - source link

                          (Quoted with permission)


                          Hi and the Greek word for " WORKOUT / KATERGAZOMI " in only in the Pauline letters and not in the Gospels , because the verb " workout " is in the Dispensation of Grace is what the Present Tens , Middle Voice , which means describes the subject as Participating in the action and is in the Imperative Mood of Command to work out what has been given to us , OSAS !!

                          You are not WORKING for salvation as all have to be saved to show works that bring Rewards at the BEMA SEAT as recorded in 1 Cor 3:10-13 !!

                          dan p



                          About Tim Staples:
                          http://www.catholic.com/profiles/tim-staples

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Danoh View Post
                            ...thanks for proving by it what few Protestants know of their so called beloved ECF, due to their own and the tradition handed down to them through the endless books based nonsense of their leaders - that THE VAST MAJORITY of the so called "Early Church Fathers" (ECF) were anything but.

                            That they were lost men - in fact; outright heretics - who the true Protestant has no business going to for what the Scripture teaches.

                            Fact is; Martin Luther (who practically worshipped Augustine) and the so called Reformers, never did fully succeed in completely breaking away from the need to point to "the tradition of men" as one's means of concluding one's view is based on Scripture.

                            The Reformers ended up replacing an over emphasis on the error that tradition far too often proves to be; with their own practice of same.

                            The recovery of the blazing glory of light that is Faith Alone based on Scripture alone, soon giving way to the above, and with that; the stunting of any further light til many centuries later, when at last; some were once more sincerely questioning "the traditions of men" the Reformers had long since bogged down any further light under.

                            Fascinating this - an RC unwittingly unveiling the very error of both the RCC and of far too many Protestants...

                            2 Peter 1:19 We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts: 1:20 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. 1:21 For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost.

                            So, you think that a 21st century man, totally separate from and generally clueless of the culture, language, and lives of Jesus and the apostles, can read the Bible in isolation and understand what the apostles taught better than their contemporaries, many of whom learned directly from the apostles themselse? Seriously? That is the height or arrogance and stupidity.

                            Saint Irenaeus, Bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul, an early Church Father and apologist, and a disciple of John... ...and you think you read the Bible and understand John better than an actual and a disciple of John? LOL. Its no wonder you drown in heresy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The little (but important) progress made in the so-called Reformation was soon obscured under it's own accretion of ecclesiarchy, ritual and superstition. The Reformed remain so today.

                              This happened for the same basic reason Paul's gospel was practically lost within a hundred years of his death: refusal to believe and rest in that which God has spoken to us today.

                              Both failures stem from faithless grasping at the earthly, and so copying if not claiming the things of Israel. Things not ours to claim.

                              Lack of faith in what God says EXCLUSIVELY TO US is the root problem, as it is in all dispensations. CC is proof of this; he's so utterly blind that he dismisses as 500 year old tradition the words of our Christ chosen apostle.

                              Yet he expects us to ally with him over mere worldly political and social issues.
                              "There is one thing worse than going to Hell. That would be going to Hell and having it be a surprise."
                              Terence Mc Lean

                              [most will be very surprised]


                              Everyone who has not believed the Gospel of grace is not saved, no matter what else they believe or do.
                              By that measure, how many professing Christians are on their way to the Lake of Fire?

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