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CT’s President: Why our editor in chief spoke out against Trump

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  • CT’s President: Why our editor in chief spoke out against Trump

    The Flag in the Whirlwind: An Update from CT’s President

    Why our editor in chief spoke out against Trump, and why the conversation must continue.

    Timothy Dalrymple December 22, 2019

    Reader responses to Mark Galli’s recent editorial have spanned the spectrum. We have received countless notes of encouragement from readers who were profoundly moved. They no longer feel alone. They have hope again. Many have told us of reading the editorial with tears in their eyes, sharing it with children who have wandered from the faith, rejoicing that at last someone was articulating what they felt in their hearts. They felt this was a watershed moment in the history of the American church—or they hoped it would prove to be. Stay strong, they told us, knowing we were about to reap the whirlwind.

    On the other hand, we have heard from many readers who felt incensed and insulted. These readers felt the editorial engaged in character assassination, or maligned a broad swath of our fellow evangelicals, or revealed that we prefer the Democrats to a President who has done a lot of good for causes we all care about.

    Of course, we appreciate the support and listen humbly to the criticisms. But at the end of the day, we write for a readership of One. God is our Tower. Let the whirlwind come.

    President Donald Trump would have you believe we are “far left.” Others have said we are not Bible-believing Christians. Neither is true. Christianity Today is theologically conservative. We are pro-life and pro-family. We are firm supporters of religious liberties and economic opportunity for men and women to exercise their gifts and create value in the world. We believe in the authority of Scripture.

    We are also a global ministry. We travel the world and see the breadth and depth of what God is doing through his people all around the planet. It is beautiful, and breathtaking, and immense. The global Body of Christ—and the community of evangelicals—is vastly larger than our domestic political squabbles. But partly on behalf of that global body, we can no longer stay silent.

    American evangelicals have always been a loose coalition of tribes. We have fought one another as often as we have fought together. We at Christianity Today believe we need to relearn the art of balancing two things: having a firm opinion and inviting free discussion. We need, in other words, both a flag and a table.

    First, then, the flag. Numerous reporters have asked whether the ministry supports what was stated in the editorial. Was Mark Galli speaking on behalf of the institution? CT does not have an editorial board. Editors publish under their own names. Yet Galli has stood in the trenches for men and women of faith for over three decades. He has been an outstanding editor in chief. While he does not speak for everyone in the ministry—our board and our staff hold a range of opinions—he carries the editorial voice of the magazine. We support CT’s editorial independence and believe it’s vital to our mission for the editor in chief to speak out on the issues of the day.

    As an institution, Christianity Today has no interest in partisan politics. It does not endorse candidates. We aim to bring biblical wisdom and beautiful storytelling both to the church and from the church to the world. Politics matter, but they do not bring the dead back to life. We are far more committed to the glory of God, the witness of the church, and the life of the world than we care about the fortunes of any party. Political parties come and go, but the witness of the church is the hope of the world, and the integrity of that witness is paramount.

    Out of love for Jesus and his church, not for political partisanship or intellectual elitism, this is why we feel compelled to say that the alliance of American evangelicalism with this presidency has wrought enormous damage to Christian witness. It has alienated many of our children and grandchildren. It has harmed African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American brothers and sisters. And it has undercut the efforts of countless missionaries who labor in the far fields of the Lord. While the Trump administration may be well regarded in some countries, in many more the perception of wholesale evangelical support for the administration has made toxic the reputation of the Bride of Christ.

    Galli’s editorial focused on the impeachment, but it was clear the issues are deeper and broader. Reasonable people can differ when it comes to the flagrantly partisan impeachment process. But this is not merely about impeachment, or even merely about President Trump. He is not the sickness. He is a symptom of a sickness that began before him, which is the hyper-politicization of the American church. This is a danger for all of us, wherever we fall on the political spectrum. Jesus said we should give to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s. With profound love and respect, we ask our brothers and sisters in Christ to consider whether they have given to Caesar what belongs only to God: their unconditional loyalty.

    Let me protect against two misunderstandings. The problem is not that we as evangelicals are associated with the Trump administration’s judicial appointments or its advocacy of life, family, and religious liberty. We are happy to celebrate the positive things the administration has accomplished. The problem is that we as evangelicals are also associated with President Trump’s rampant immorality, greed, and corruption; his divisiveness and race-baiting; his cruelty and hostility to immigrants and refugees; and more. In other words, the problem is the wholeheartedness of the embrace. It is one thing to praise his accomplishments; it is another to excuse and deny his obvious misuses of power.

    Similarly, this is neither a criticism of the evangelical Trump voter nor an endorsement of the Democrats. The 2016 election confronted evangelical voters with an impossible dilemma: Vote for a pro-choice candidate whose policies would advance so much of what we oppose, or vote for an extravagantly immoral candidate who could well damage the standing of the republic and the witness of the church.
    Countless men and women we hold in the highest regard voted for President Trump, some wholeheartedly and some reluctantly. Friends we love and respect have also counseled and worked within the Trump administration. We believe they are doing their best to serve wisely in a fallen world.

    We nevertheless believe the evangelical alliance with this presidency has done damage to our witness here and abroad. The cost has been too high. American evangelicalism is not a Republican PAC. We are a diverse movement that should collaborate with political parties when prudent but always standing apart, at a prophetic distance, to be what Martin Luther King, Jr. called “the conscience of the state.” That is what we believe. This is where we plant our flag. We know we are not alone.

    Now, to the table. A table is a place of welcome, a place where bread is broken and friendships are forged. In a political landscape dominated by polarization, hostility, and misunderstanding, we believe it’s critical for Christians to model how to have a firm opinion and host free discussion at the same time. Evangelicals of different stripes cannot continue to shout one another down, bully those who disagree, or exclude one another and refuse to listen.

    We hold fast to our view that the wholehearted evangelical embrace of Trump has been enormously costly—but we are committed to irenic conversation with men and women of good faith who believe otherwise. (And since an open letterwas published even as we were preparing to publish this statement, let me simply say that I appreciate the thoughts it expresses, and I hope this statement too can be the beginning of a dialogue.)

    In the words of Proverbs 27:6, “faithful are the wounds of a friend” (ESV). Deeply aware of our own sinfulness and limitations, we are going to invite supporters and critics alike to produce essays agreeing or disagreeing with our stated views. It is time for evangelicals to have a serious discussion about how our identity as Christians shapes our activity as citizens. We will invite authors who represent a variety of viewpoints in a thoughtful and charitable manner. We will publish those essays in mid-January. We hope we can come together in convicted humility and learn from one another.

    Now it is time for Christmas. Christ is still the light that shines upon a people living in darkness. We look forward to resuming the conversation soon.

    The flag is planted. The table is set. We invite you to join us at either one.

    Timothy Dalrymple is president and CEO of Christianity Today.


    Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

  • #2
    I don't agree with everything stated in the original CT editorial posted below, because it's clear that yes, Trump did have a "serious opportunity to offer his side of the story in the House hearings on impeachment." But reading that is actually encouraging, because this call for impeachment is coming from a place of 'Democrats bad,' and yet still coming.

    Trump Should Be Removed from Office

    It’s time to say what we said 20 years ago when a president’s character was revealed for what it was.
    MARK GALLIDECEMBER 19, 2019


    . . . . But the facts in this instance are unambiguous: The president of the United States attempted to use his political power to coerce a foreign leader to harass and discredit one of the president’s political opponents. That is not only a violation of the Constitution; more importantly, it is profoundly immoral.

    The reason many are not shocked about this is that this president has dumbed down the idea of morality in his administration. He has hired and fired a number of people who are now convicted criminals. He himself has admitted to immoral actions in business and his relationship with women, about which he remains proud. His Twitter feed alone—with its habitual string of mischaracterizations, lies, and slanders—is a near perfect example of a human being who is morally lost and confused.

    Trump’s evangelical supporters have pointed to his Supreme Court nominees, his defense of religious liberty, and his stewardship of the economy, among other things, as achievements that justify their support of the president. We believe the impeachment hearings have made it absolutely clear, in a way the Mueller investigation did not, that President Trump has abused his authority for personal gain and betrayed his constitutional oath. The impeachment hearings have illuminated the president’s moral deficiencies for all to see. This damages the institution of the presidency, damages the reputation of our country, and damages both the spirit and the future of our people. None of the president’s positives can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.
    Last edited by annabenedetti; December 23, 2019, 03:05 PM.

    Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

    Comment


    • #3
      . . . . To the many evangelicals who continue to support Mr. Trump in spite of his blackened moral record, we might say this: Remember who you are and whom you serve. Consider how your justification of Mr. Trump influences your witness to your Lord and Savior. Consider what an unbelieving world will say if you continue to brush off Mr. Trump’s immoral words and behavior in the cause of political expediency. If we don’t reverse course now, will anyone take anything we say about justice and righteousness with any seriousness for decades to come? Can we say with a straight face that abortion is a great evil that cannot be tolerated and, with the same straight face, say that the bent and broken character of our nation’s leader doesn’t really matter in the end?


      To this observer of evangelical Christianity: No and no. You are broken.

      Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

      Comment


      • #4

        Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

        Comment


        • #5
          CHRISTIANITY TODAY SUBSCRIPTIONS ROSE AFTER OP-ED CALLING FOR DONALD TRUMP'S REMOVAL FROM OFFICE, MAGAZINE SAYS
          BY HUNTER MOYLER ON 12/23/19 AT 1:32 PM EST

          The editor-in-chief of Christianity Today said in an interview on MSNBC that the magazine has received enough new subscribers to more than make up for the ones it lost after publishing a controversial op-ed calling for the removal of President Donald Trump from office after his impeachment.

          Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

          Comment


          • #6
            It is hard to vote these days. I believe it is important to vote. However, the pick is hard. I look for what I believe is right in the eyes of the Lord. That seems to get harder and harder. One party seems to have been kidnapped by liberals and the other seems to be run by money.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
              CHRISTIANITY TODAY SUBSCRIPTIONS ROSE AFTER OP-ED CALLING FOR DONALD TRUMP'S REMOVAL FROM OFFICE, MAGAZINE SAYS
              BY HUNTER MOYLER ON 12/23/19 AT 1:32 PM EST

              The editor-in-chief of Christianity Today said in an interview on MSNBC that the magazine has received enough new subscribers to more than make up for the ones it lost after publishing a controversial op-ed calling for the removal of President Donald Trump from office after his impeachment.
              Hi and I will VOTE for TRUMP and CT is a liberal rag and even FRANKLIN GRAHAM is voting for TRUMP !!

              By the way , which of the DEMOCRATS could have I done what TRUMP has done in 3 years and protected Israel ?

              dan p
              Last edited by DAN P; December 28, 2019, 11:52 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bradley D View Post
                It is hard to vote these days. I believe it is important to vote. However, the pick is hard. I look for what I believe is right in the eyes of the Lord. That seems to get harder and harder. One party seems to have been kidnapped by liberals and the other seems to be run by money.
                I'm in the same boat, Brad. I'm not a Trump supporter. But I can't vote for the Democrats. They embrace insane positions. They literally embrace degeneracy and wickedness.
                Your problem is not technology. The problem is YOU. You lack the will to change...You treat this planet as you treat each other. - Klaatu

                What are you talking about? There is no such thing as the "Mafia"......it doesn't exist. Just a bunch of lies told to defame honest hardworking Italians like myself. - TomO

                I will do you, let's see, goofy, wacky, and to the left side of the bell curve
                . -Ktoyou

                I'm white. I'm not black. I can't convert to being black. It doesn't matter how much I want to become black. I could listen to rap and date fat white women all day; for all that, I'll still remain white.- Traditio

                Comment


                • #9
                  Trump is a Child.

                  A spoiled Rich Child.

                  He only hurts Democracy as long as he in in Power.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    OK, Trump's a jerk.


                    Did they speak out against that evil scumbag Obama?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      https://www.christianpost.com/news/n...n-witness.html
                      "In a letter to Timothy Dalrymple, the president of Christianity Today, nearly 200 evangelical faith leaders condemned both its editorial calling for the removal of President Donald Trump from office and its editor-in-chief, Mark Galli, for dismissing evangelicals who oppose his views on the matter as being “far right.”

                      On Sunday, the faith leaders said in the letter, which can be read in full below, that the editorial “offensively questioned the spiritual integrity and Christian witness of tens-of-millions of believers who take seriously their civic and moral obligations."

                      The signatories also decried Galli who they say “offensively dismissed” their point of view in comments he made in an interview with CNN Friday, where he said that evangelicals who are upset or outraged by his Christianity Today editorial do not read the magazine because they are “Christians on the far right, evangelicals on the far right, so they’re going to be as dismissive of the magazine as President Trump has shown to be.”

                      “We are, in fact, not ‘far-right’ evangelicals as characterized by the author," the letter states. "Rather, we are Bible-believing Christians and patriotic Americans who are simply grateful that our president has sought our advice as his administration has advanced policies that protect the unborn, promote religious freedom, reform our criminal justice system, contribute to strong working families through paid family leave, protect the freedom of conscience, prioritize parental rights, and ensure that our foreign policy aligns with our values while making our world safer, including through our support of the State of Israel.

                      It continues, "We are not theocrats and we recognize that our imperfect political system is a reflection of the fallen world within which we live, reliant upon the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, which is freely given to sinner and saint, alike.

                      “We are proud to be numbered among those in history who, like Jesus, have been pretentiously accused of having too much grace for tax collectors and sinners, and we take deeply our personal responsibility to render unto Caesar what is Caesar's — our public service."

                      They also denounced assertions Galli made in an essay published last year in the book Still Evangelical?, in which he derided the 76% of white self-identified evangelical voters who helped elect Trump in 2016. He described those individuals as "evangelicals [who] often haven’t finished college, and if they have jobs (and apparently most of them don’t), they are blue collar jobs or entry level work.” In the same piece, Galli referred to himself as belonging to a different group of evangelicals, the “elite” evangelicals.

                      The letter also assumes that Christianity Today will support a Democrat in the 2020 presidential election, and issues a challenge to publicly declare which Democrat they will support.
                      Without Genesis, absolutely nothing makes sense in all of Scripture.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 6days View Post
                        https://www.christianpost.com/news/n...n-witness.html
                        "In a letter to Timothy Dalrymple, the president of Christianity Today, nearly 200 evangelical faith leaders condemned both its editorial calling for the removal of President Donald Trump from office and its editor-in-chief, Mark Galli, for dismissing evangelicals who oppose his views on the matter as being “far right.”
                        Mark Galli is half right.
                        The evangelicals who oppose his views on Trump are "right" (correct), but they are not "far right".
                        Learn to read what is written.

                        _____
                        The people who are supposed to be experts and who claim to understand the science are precisely the people who are blind to the evidence.
                        ~ Dr Freeman Dyson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Child of God View Post
                          Trump is a Child.

                          A spoiled Rich Child.

                          He only hurts Democracy as long as he in in Power.
                          Democracy is one of the most evil forms of government.
                          Our constitution guaranteed us a Republican form of government.
                          Learn to read what is written.

                          _____
                          The people who are supposed to be experts and who claim to understand the science are precisely the people who are blind to the evidence.
                          ~ Dr Freeman Dyson

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ok doser View Post
                            OK, Trump's a jerk.


                            Did they speak out against that evil scumbag Obama?
                            Hi and how quickly they FORGET !!

                            dan p

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              9,937 people are talking about this

                              Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

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