Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Monster HIV Outbreak in Indiana over Oxy drug use

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Monster HIV Outbreak in Indiana over Oxy drug use



    The Drug That’s Infecting Indiana

    One rural American town is in the grip of a dramatic outbreak of HIV — and right at its heart is a single, powerful, dangerous addiction.


    By Leigh Cowart
    Follow live



    I’ve never been escorted out of a community center by two large men, but I suppose there’s a first time for everything. Here, at ground zero for an HIV outbreak currently ravaging the sparsely populated Scott County in rural Indiana, things are tense — no doubt fueled by the presence of a national news-making rate of disease transmission. The reporter in me balks at the proverbial — or, in this case, literal — doors slamming in my face. But I felt a wave of gentle pride at the steadfast way I was removed from the premises. Patient confidentiality is a big deal, and no one who cares wants to risk scaring off people who need health services just because some nosy ***** with a notepad wants to ask a few questions.
    Listen, I get it. I mean, perhaps the silent meatman that my ejectionist brought as backup was a bit much. Then again, maybe I looked like I was spoiling for a fight. Either way, there are more important things going on in Scott County than whether or not a journalist needs two escorts out of the building, or just one.



    Back in January, the Indiana State Department of Health began looking into HIV in Scott County after 11 new cases were confirmed. The number was notable: historically, the county sees fewer than five cases a year in a community of 4,200. As the clock stumbled forward, the picture only got bleaker. By March 26, a public health emergency was declared. To date, there have been 142 cases, with new seroconversions coming almost every day.
    These cases are linked to intravenous drug use. According to a report from the CDC looking at the first 135 incidents, 80% of them occurred in users with a history of IV drug use. Four of the remainder said they had no needle-based drug use, and the rest still need to be asked. But every single confirmed IV drug user reported using the same drug: Opana.
    Oxymorphone, know by the brand name Opana, is a semi-synthetic opioid painkiller. It is also strong as ****. It’s got an extended release, and while taking it follows the common practice of crushing, then dissolving, and then cooking, the resulting fix is definitely strong enough to share. And, in a state like Indiana where carrying a needle or syringe without a prescription can get you in trouble with the law, the communal aspect of drug taking and needle sharing seem to have created the perfect conditions for bloodborne disease transmission. Those surveyed reported injecting anywhere between four and 15 times daily, with the number of injection partners ranging from one to six per event. It’s the first time that an outbreak of HIV has been linked to the injection of prescription drugs. It probably won’t be the last.



    To combat this significant problem, Governor Mike Pence authorized a short-term needle exchange program, which is underway at the Community Outreach Center.
    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/599/1*BkKo0kTh4QEwZcasKrjxoA.jpeg[/IMG]
    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/599/1*_GPEfwtyrcq0I4MrVpqYiw.jpeg[/IMG]
    The center, which opened March 30th, and kicked me out on Monday morning, serves as a one-stop shop for those in need of services, providing ways for members of the community to get State-issued ID cards and birth certificates, enroll in health insurance, get vaccinated for tetanus or hepatitis, as well as giving them job counseling and local training. However, perhaps most importantly, the center offers free HIV testing, a needle exchange service, and provides information about prevention, treatment, and substance abuse referrals. It’s also where I started my search for answers about how this outbreak came to be.
    The center is tucked away on a side road in this small town. Still, you can’t miss it: two large roadside construction signs face the street from both directions, shouting the opening hours in flashing orange lights.
    Inside, the building is spartan, with a bare waiting area decorated with two rows of chairs facing a table full of pamphlets. The entrance to the needle exchange is separate from the public entrance. Both are marked with copious signage. At first glance, it just looks like another yard, but you realize very soon that it’s something else entirely. It feels sleepy and quiet, but the stakes couldn’t be higher: if the outbreak is to be stopped, we must first at least find the scope of it. And the numbers tick higher every day.
    We’re at a tenuous point. Over the last two decades, HIV infections related to intravenous drug use have been on the decline across the country, but this current outbreak has experts worried. Scott County is small, but it’s not unique; like many rural counties, it has high unemployment, a large percentage of adults who have not finished high school, and many in the community with limited access to healthcare. Add on powerful, shareable opiates and government initiatives to limit access to clean needles , and you, my friend, have the makings of a catastrophe


    Behold, the whirlwind of the Lord
    Goes forth with fury, A continuing whirlwind;
    It will fall violently on the head of the wicked.
    The fierce anger of the Lord will not return
    until He has done it, And until He has performed
    the intents of His heart.
    In the final days you will consider it. - Jer. 30:23-24



    sigpic

  • #2
    The needle exchange program is a good idea. What we need to do if we want to reduce drug addiction is end the drug war and stop imprisoning non-violent drug offenders, and we could use that money for rehab programs. I am a former opiate addict. Praise God I'm not anymore. I never really got into IV use, praise God. And thank God I have a supportive family that allowed me to live with them so I could afford to pay for treatment. Treatment is very expensive.

    People have to want to quit or they never really will, but we should make the resources available for people who want to quit using drugs.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, the idea of criminalizing having a clean needle without a prescription is patently absurd and shows a disregard for the wellbeing of your fellow man that is deplorable to the point of being evangelical christian. Why on earth does the republican governor like limiting the availability of clean needles? Because christians want that. That's sad.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TrakeM View Post
        Yeah, the idea of criminalizing having a clean needle without a prescription is patently absurd and shows a disregard for the wellbeing of your fellow man that is deplorable to the point of being evangelical christian. Why on earth does the republican governor like limiting the availability of clean needles? Because christians want that. That's sad.
        What evidence do you have that ""Christians" want to limit availability of needles?

        It seems obvious that the uber-rich who own and run corporations and govt
        are careless homosexuals, but not likely Christians in any sense of the word.

        Occasionally rich people pose as Christians (TV evangelists for instance)
        to make money, but really, who could be fooled by that.

        Behold, the whirlwind of the Lord
        Goes forth with fury, A continuing whirlwind;
        It will fall violently on the head of the wicked.
        The fierce anger of the Lord will not return
        until He has done it, And until He has performed
        the intents of His heart.
        In the final days you will consider it. - Jer. 30:23-24



        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Daniel1611 View Post
          The needle exchange program is a good idea. What we need to do if we want to reduce drug addiction is end the drug war and stop imprisoning non-violent drug offenders, and we could use that money for rehab programs. I am a former opiate addict. Praise God I'm not anymore. I never really got into IV use, praise God. And thank God I have a supportive family that allowed me to live with them so I could afford to pay for treatment. Treatment is very expensive.

          People have to want to quit or they never really will, but we should make the resources available for people who want to quit using drugs.
          The war on dealers (not users) needs to be expanded. Selling drugs is the worst form of violence.

          12 step programs are free, responsible citizens should not have to pay for treatment when addicts knew it was illegal and addictive before they started.

          Incarcerated criminals should be required to do a self sustaining amount of work, grow food, public works programs etc. so that law abiders don't have to pay for them to sit around on their butts playing cards and lifting weights.

          Drugs aren't addictive because they are illegal, they are addictive because the weakness of the human condition for a % of the population.
          You bring drugs into America, you get the death penalty that you are serving on so many of your customers!

          "Mortal man was never the property of the archdeceivers. Jesus did not die to ransom man from the clutch of the apostate rulers and fallen princes of the spheres. The Father in heaven never conceived of such crass injustice as damning a mortal soul because of the evil doing of his ancestors."UB

          Comment

          Working...
          X