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  • Victim Blaming

    I was perusing some old threads the other day and ran across this:

    Originally posted by glassjester View Post
    ... Have you ever been personally responsible for a crime committed against you?
    it prompted me to respond (in another thread) with this:


    When I was in third grade, eight years old, I would ride my bike to school. I would lock it at the bike rack and ride home in the afternoon. One day I forgot to lock it and it was stolen. I went back into the school, had the teacher call my mom and out by the bike rack we gathered, me and mom, my teacher, the principal and a policeman from our little town.

    All the adults were crystal clear that the thief was clearly and unequivocally a bike thief, and that he deserved to be caught and punished.

    All the adults were equally clear that my failure to lock the bike was a contributing factor to the theft, that I needed to be more careful in the future and always make sure to lock my bike.

    Today, I could probably get the cop, the teacher and the principal fired for daring to engage in victim blaming.

  • #2
    I was thinking about this in connection with the MAGA Hat thread as well, the social media mob's infantile demands for justice for the victims who weren't - Nathan Phillips, Jussie Smollet, etc

    Any attempt by the rational observer to question the faux narrative that was presented as truth were shouted down as "victim blaming"
    Last edited by ok doser; January 22nd, 2020, 02:20 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ok doser View Post
      I was thinking about this in connection with the MAGA Hat thread as well, the social media mob's infantile demands for justice for the victims who weren't - Nathan Phillips, Jussie Smollet, etc

      Any attempt by the rational observer to question the faux narrative that was presented as truth were shouted down as "victim blaming"
      What the leftist medial mob did to Nick Sandmann was disgusting and despicable.
      Your problem is not technology. The problem is YOU. You lack the will to change...You treat this planet as you treat each other. - Klaatu

      What are you talking about? There is no such thing as the "Mafia"......it doesn't exist. Just a bunch of lies told to defame honest hardworking Italians like myself. - TomO

      I will do you, let's see, goofy, wacky, and to the left side of the bell curve
      . -Ktoyou

      I'm white. I'm not black. I can't convert to being black. It doesn't matter how much I want to become black. I could listen to rap and date fat white women all day; for all that, I'll still remain white.- Traditio

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by The Berean View Post
        What the leftist medial mob did to Nick Sandmann was disgusting and despicable.
        the latest is that CNN settled out of court

        betcha dint hear a peep about it on the MSM : https://theologyonline.com/forum/pol...78#post2732578

        Comment


        • #5

          BikeWalkKC says police description of cyclist accident borders on ‘victim blaming’

          By Katie Moore



          A Kansas City organization said the police’s description of a crash involving a bike and a vehicle that left a cyclist with life-threatening injuries borders on “victim-blaming.”

          Pablo Sanders, who is active in the biking community, was injured in the Christmas Eve crash, according to BikeWalkKC.

          The Kansas City Police Department said the cyclist suffered life-threatening head injuries when he was struck at the intersection of Southwest Trafficway and Valentine Road.


          The collision occurred as a Buick traveling north on Southwest Trafficway proceeded through a green light at Valentine. A man wearing dark clothing was riding east to west through the intersection, the police department said. The Buick tried to avoid the cyclist, but struck the bike.




          The cyclist was wearing a helmet, but the straps were not property secured, causing the helmet to come off in the collision.

          The driver remained at the scene and alcohol was not a factor, said Sgt. Jacob Becchina, a spokesman for KCPD.

          No citations have been issued at this point.

          “I’m concerned this framing of the crash is verging on victim-blaming,” said Liz Harris, spokeswoman for BikeWalkKC. “The circumstances as we understand them could have resulted in this serious injury even if Pablo was doing everything 100% ‘right’ at this time.”

          Harris said the intersection at Southwest Trafficway and Valentine Road is especially problematic because the traffic signal doesn’t consistently detect bicycles and the green light doesn’t last long enough to cross the road before turning red.




          Thirteen pedestrians or cyclists have been killed on Kansas City’s roads this year, according to BikeWalkKC.


          Read more here: https://www.kansascity.com/news/loca...#storylink=cpy




          So a cyclist ran a red light and was struck by a car, the cyclist's helmet was not secured and came off, the cyclist suffered a head injury


          a head injury that would NOT have occurred if the cyclist had

          1. stopped for the red light
          or
          2. had his helmet properly secured

          and this is "victim blaming"


          OK - how about this - let's not call the cyclist a "victim" - let's call him a criminal, since his actions which were directly responsible for the accident were, in fact, criminal actions.

          Comment


          • #6
            The cyclist passed the Darwin Test.
            Learn to read what is written.

            _____
            The people who are supposed to be experts and who claim to understand the science are precisely the people who are blind to the evidence.
            ~ Dr Freeman Dyson

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ok doser View Post
              I was perusing some old threads the other day and ran across this:

              it prompted me to respond (in another thread) with this:

              When I was in third grade, eight years old, I would ride my bike to school. I would lock it at the bike rack and ride home in the afternoon. One day I forgot to lock it and it was stolen. I went back into the school, had the teacher call my mom and out by the bike rack we gathered, me and mom, my teacher, the principal and a policeman from our little town.

              All the adults were crystal clear that the thief was clearly and unequivocally a bike thief, and that he deserved to be caught and punished.

              All the adults were equally clear that my failure to lock the bike was a contributing factor to the theft, that I needed to be more careful in the future and always make sure to lock my bike.

              Today, I could probably get the cop, the teacher and the principal fired for daring to engage in victim blaming.
              We are all responsible for our actions. The thief is responsible for the theft. You are responsible for having made it easy for him.

              Comment


              • #8

                Culture of Victims




                Reflections on a Culture of Victims & How Psychotherapy Fuels the Victim Industry

                Introduction

                We have become a nation of victims, where everyone is leapfrogging over each other, competing for the status of victim, where most people define themselves as some sort of survivor. We live in a culture where more and more people are claiming their own holocaust. While some victims are truly innocent (i.e., the child who is being molested, a victim in the other car in a drunk driving accident), most violence involves some knowledge, familiarity or intimacy between victims and victimizers. Charles Sykes, author of the widely acclaimed A Nation of Victims (1992), points out that if you add up all the groups that consider themselves to be victims or oppressed, their number adds up to almost 400 percent of the population. Exploring the psychology or the dynamic of victimhood has been suppressed and censored because it has been equated with “victim blaming”. As the article Rethinking ‘Don’t Blame The Victim’ illuminates, the victim stance is a powerful one.




                https://www.zurinstitute.com/victim-psychology/

                Comment


                • #9
                  The victim’s basic stance is that he or she:
                  • Is not responsible for what happened.
                  • Is always morally right.
                  • Is not accountable.
                  • Is forever entitled to sympathy.
                  • Is justified in feeling moral indignation for being wronged.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Stella Awards For Frivolous Lawsuits

                    This section is based on the 2002 Stella Awards web page. This section is a humorous illustration of our victim and entitled culture, and how this culture is being perpetuated by attorneys and the legal system. The Stella Awards are named after 81-year-old Stella Liebeck who spilled coffee on herself and successfully sued McDonalds. This case inspired the Stella Awards for the most frivolous, successful lawsuits in the United States. (The StellaAwards.com has been heavily criticized and some have claimed that there no evidence to support these stories. For more information go to Snopes.com or http://www.StellaAwards.com/bogus.html)

                    The following is a partial list of 2002 candidates, appearing in the above web page:
                    1. Kathleen Robertson of Austin, Texas, was awarded $780,000 by a jury of her peers after breaking her ankle, tripping over a toddler who was running inside a furniture store. The owners of the store were understandably surprised at the verdict, considering the misbehaving little toddler was Ms. Robertson’s son.
                    2. 19-year-old Carl Truman of Los Angeles won $74,000 and medical expenses when his neighbor ran over his hand with a Honda Accord. Mr. Truman apparently didn’t notice there was someone at the wheel of the car when he was trying to steal his neighbor’s hubcaps.
                    3. Terrence Dickson of Bristol, Pennsylvania, was leaving a house he had just finished robbing by way of the garage. He was not able to get the garage door to go up since the automatic door opener was malfunctioning. He couldn’t re-enter the house because the door connecting the house and garage locked when he pulled it shut. The family was on vacation, and Mr. Dickson found himself locked in the garage for eight days. He subsisted on a case of Pepsi and a large bag of dry dog food that he found there. He sued the homeowner’s insurance company, claiming the situation caused him undue mental anguish. The jury agreed to the tune of $500,000.
                    4. A Philadelphia restaurant was ordered to pay Amber Carson of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, $113,500 after she slipped on a soft drink and broke her coccyx (tailbone). The beverage was on the floor because Ms. Carson had thrown it at her boyfriend also 30 seconds earlier during an argument.

                    More outrageous examples are presented in Rethinking ‘Don’t Blame the Victim’.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Female Researcher Spoils International Women’s Day With Inconvenient Facts: You’re Not Victims

                      By Pluralist | Mar 8, 2019

                      “A new trauma-centered feminism has taken hold.”

                      In honor of International Women’s Day, Politico asked leading American ladies what they think is “the biggest challenge facing women in the U.S. today?”

                      The article, published Friday, included thoughts from Democratic presidential hopefuls Sens. Kamala Harris of California, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, along with a number of feminist scholars and commentators.



                      The problems they identified were mostly predictable feminist whipping boys: sexism, misogyny, “the patriarchy,” underrepresentation, the “gender pay gap,” and lack of opportunity.

                      But Christina Hoff Sommers, an ethicist and researcher at the American Enterprise Institute, was not playing along. One of two conservative women included in the article – the other being Margaret Hoover, the host of PBS’ “Firing Line” – she delivered a hardheaded takedown of “trauma-based feminism.”

                      Sommers, aka the Factual Feminist, noted that “by any reasonable measure, American women are among the safest, freest, healthiest, most opportunity-rich women on Earth.”



                      “In many ways, we are not just doing as well as men, we are surpassing them,” she said, echoing the likes of Canadian psychologist Jordan Peterson. “But everywhere, especially on college campuses, young women are being taught that they are vulnerable, fragile and in imminent danger. A new trauma-centered feminism has taken hold. Its primary focus is not equality with men – but rather protection from them.”


                      Sommers condemned the “current environment of fear and panic.” She pointed to the media coverage last June of what she called a “ludicrously flawed” Reuters Foundation study that named the United States among the top 10 most dangerous countries in the world – ahead of Iran or North Korea.

                      Even the Politico article – after noting that a record number of women are serving in Congress and running for president, and including a photo of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York celebrating with other Democratic women – claimed that women “can still find gender equality elusive.”

                      Instead of feeling sorry for themselves, Sommers suggested, American women ought to appreciate the gains they have made relative to the past and to much of the rest of the world.

                      “This new ethic of fear and fragility is poisonous and debilitating – but it’s gaining ground. American women should resist the urge to pretend the world is rigged against us when it is not,” she said.

                      “In countries like Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, Cambodia and Egypt women are contending with practices such as honor killings, genital mutilation, acid burnings, child marriage and gender apartheid.”

                      However, in the developing world, too, a growing number of educated women are “making their presences felt,” Sommers said, citing examples from Saudi Arabia and Somalia.

                      While feminists argue that none of this progress would be possible without them, Sommers is not alone in her analysis that the movement has lot the plot. Even some liberals have warned that the #MeToo focus on “toxic masculinity” and “rape culture” risks casting women as as helpless victims of supposed male oppressors.

                      https://pluralist.com/christina-hoff...al-womens-day/

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