Stretch Cosmology to the One-Way Speed of Light

Jefferson

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Stretch Cosmology to the One-Way Speed of Light

This is the show from Friday, July 9th, 2021

SUMMARY:

AN RSR GOOGLE CREATION TOOL: The time-saving multiple creation-site search!

Real Science Radio hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams discuss the scientific world's measurement of the roundtrip speed of light with Einstein pointing out the inability of physicists to measure the one-way speed. The guys compare those who claim to have measured light's one-way speed to those who claim to have manufactured a perpetual motion machine. Yet with fear and trepidation, they've been asking themselves whether or not they should publicly propose an experiment to measure the one-way speed of light using brand new technology the likes of which Einstein (and even almost all current scientists) would never have dreamed could be possible. But before getting to that, the guys reminisce about their radio program from 2011 and the written material on its page at rsr.org/stretch, where for the last couple of years they've hidden in plain view their proposed experiment (shhh, don't tell anyone) to measure the one-way speed of light.
 

tieman55

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I think this is an easy way to check the one way speed of light and would like to hear your thoughts about it, Thanks Mike

In space, using three satellites...rotate a laser on the center satellite, another satellite is say, 49.712 km away and another is 45.712 kilometers form the laser and at an angle of 5 degrees radius apart from each other, that will give you a 45 degree angle between the two satellites targets, with the mean radius at 47.712 KM

Spin, rotate or move the laser on its axis at the rate of 1,000 Rev/per/sec. At the mean distance the tip of the laser is moving roughly the conventional believed speed of light. When the light hits both the other satellites at the same time, using simple math, use the rotational rate of the laser to calculate the speed of light. If the light never hits them both at the same time either light is instant or you need to keep going higher rotational speeds and or at further distances.


Timing gets interesting... if timing is the right term. If you use a clock to measure the sequence of the two beams hitting the two satellites, which is not absolutely necessary, When the light hits them both at the same time, that would mean that the clock doesn't move, when the speed of light is achieved. If you use a clock to measure "0" time are you measuring time and or using the clock ???
 

Derf

Well-known member
I think this is an easy way to check the one way speed of light and would like to hear your thoughts about it, Thanks Mike

In space, using three satellites...rotate a laser on the center satellite, another satellite is say, 49.712 km away and another is 45.712 kilometers form the laser and at an angle of 5 degrees radius apart from each other, that will give you a 45 degree angle between the two satellites targets, with the mean radius at 47.712 KM

Spin, rotate or move the laser on its axis at the rate of 1,000 Rev/per/sec. At the mean distance the tip of the laser is moving roughly the conventional believed speed of light. When the light hits both the other satellites at the same time, using simple math, use the rotational rate of the laser to calculate the speed of light. If the light never hits them both at the same time either light is instant or you need to keep going higher rotational speeds and or at further distances.


Timing gets interesting... if timing is the right term. If you use a clock to measure the sequence of the two beams hitting the two satellites, which is not absolutely necessary, When the light hits them both at the same time, that would mean that the clock doesn't move, when the speed of light is achieved. If you use a clock to measure "0" time are you measuring time and or using the clock ???
“At the same time” is where you get into trouble, sneaking in the 2-way speed of light. Time transfer involves getting the time info at one clock to the other one (or both to a third location), and so that requires sending information at the speed of light or something related to it.

Plus, it’s pretty hard to keep three orbiting spacecraft at such precise distances for any length of time.
 
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