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Peter's Hope

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  • ECT: Peter's Hope

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    1Pet 3:15 . . Always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope.

    Peter's hope was likely the same as Paul's, which is not so much an exemption from the sum of all fears, rather; resurrection.

    "Brethren, I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees; with respect to the hope and the resurrection of the dead I am on trial." (Acts 23:6)

    There's a couple of resurrections in the works. The first is to an immortal body, and the second is to a non immortal body which will have to undergo yet a second death in the lake of brimstone depicted at Rev 20:11-15. I think it's pretty safe to assume that Peter wasn't looking forward to the second death; viz: he was anticipating an immortal body rather than a non immortal.

    Anyway, the Greek word for "hope" in 1Pet 3:15 is elpis (el pece') which means to anticipate (usually with pleasure) and to expect with confidence. Note the elements of anticipation, expectation, and confidence.

    In other words: elpis hope is a know-so hope rather than a cross your fingers hope. So, unless someone knows for proof-positive, beyond even the slightest glimmer of sensible doubt, that they are in line for an immortal body, then of course it is impossible for them to comply with Peter's instructions seeing as they would not have the kind of hope about which he wrote.

    Rom 12:12 . . Rejoice in hope.

    When people are praying for the best, while in the back of their mind dreading the worst, they have absolutely no cause for rejoicing; no; but they do have plenty of cause to fear the unknown.

    Rome of course does not allow its followers to have the kind of hope about which the apostle Peter wrote. It's against the rules.

    Council of Trent Session 6, Chapter 16, Canon16: If anyone says that he will for certain, with an absolute and infallible certainty, have that great gift of perseverance even to the end, unless he shall have learned this by a special revelation, let him be anathema.

    Elpis hope is a calling.

    Eph 4:4 . .You were also called to the one hope

    So when people are in doubt about their afterlife circumstances; it's a sure-fire indication that they have not yet responded to the call to the one hope.

    1Pet 1:3 . . Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! By his great mercy we have been born anew to a living hope

    The "living hope" is again the Greek word elpis; which speaks of confident expectation. According to the supreme Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, when people lack the living hope-- i.e. the elpis hope --it can only be because they have not yet been born anew seeing as that's how elpis hope is obtained; and if that was the supreme Pope's belief, then it really ought to be every Catholic's belief too.
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  • #2
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    OBJECTION: It appears to me that according to Matt 16:16 and Jer 17:13, God is the living hope rather than resurrection to an immortal body.

    RESPONSE: The Hebrew word for "hope" in Jer 17:13 means pretty much the same as the Greek word for hope in 1Pet 3:15. In other words; neither language for hope speaks of wishful thinking and/or someone crossing their fingers and praying for the best while in the back of their mind dreading the worst.

    OBJECTION: According to CCC 1843, Catholics have a hope because it says "By hope we desire, and with steadfast trust await from God, eternal life and the graces to merit it."

    RESPONSE: CCC 1843 doesn't say by hope we "expect". It says by hope we "desire". The catechism has to say desire or otherwise it would contradict Council of Trent Session 6, Chapter 16, Canon16, which reads: If anyone says that he will for certain, with an absolute and infallible certainty, have that great gift of perseverance even to the end, unless he shall have learned this by a special revelation, let him be anathema.

    Every conscientious Catholic desires eternal life, but of course none are permitted to be 100% confident that they'll get it except they know so by a special revelation. In point of fact; Rome's interpretation of Philip 2:12 and Philip 3:8-14 exhorts Catholics to continue seeking, and making every effort to obtain, eternal life.

    In contrast to the Canon, Rome's interpretations, and the Catechism; the supreme pope of the Roman Catholic Church teaches thus:

    "You know that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your fathers, not with perishable things such as silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, like that of a lamb without blemish or spot.

    . . . He was destined before the foundation of the world but was made manifest at the end of the times for your sake. Through him you have confidence in God, who raised him from the dead and gave him glory, so that your faith and hope are in God." (1Pet 1:18-21)

    The Greek word for "hope" in that passage is the very same word for hope in 1Pet 3:15. In a nutshell: Catholicism's supreme pope was 100% fully assured that he had absolutely nothing to fear about the afterlife due to the ransom that Christ paid to rescue his soul from the consequences of his futile ways, i.e. any and all conduct that would normally put Peter in jeopardy of humanity's worst nightmare.

    Now if Catholicism's supreme pope was confident that Christ's ransom was sufficient to spare him the sum of all fears, then all Catholics everywhere should be 100% fully assured too; but I dare say you may experience difficulty finding one who is. Hell is in the back of every conscientious Catholic's mind right along with the very real possibility of their ending up in that awful place in spite of their being informed that the purpose that Christ went to the cross was to rescue their souls from that very fate.
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    • #3
      "Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil" (Heb. 6:19).

      Christ is my anchor whom through I am able to come into the presence of the Father.

      Comment


      • #4
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        Originally posted by Bradley D View Post
        "Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil" (Heb. 6:19).
        A Greek word for "hope" is not actually in Heb 6:19. The English word is penciled in apparently because that version's translators felt the verse makes better sense with it. Below is the 2011 Catholic Bible's version; which is much closer to the real thing.

        "This we have as an anchor of the soul, sure and firm, which reaches into the interior behind the veil"


        Originally posted by Bradley D View Post
        Christ is my anchor whom through I am able to come into the presence of the Father.
        It could be construed, in a roundabout way, that Christ is the anchor spoken of in that area of the letter to Hebrews; but technically it isn't him. The anchor actually consists of two immutable things spoken of in preceding verses.


        FAQ: What are the two immutable things?

        A: They're oaths.

        The first was sworn to Abraham in which God promised, in part: "Indeed I will greatly bless you, and I will greatly multiply your seed as the stars of the heavens, and as the sand which is on the seashore" (Heb 6:14, Gen 22:17)

        The second was sworn to Jesus in which God promised: "You are a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek." (Heb 7:21, Ps 110:4)
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        • #5
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          1Pet 1:3 . . Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! By his great mercy we have been born anew to a living hope

          According to the language and grammar of that passage: Peter, along with the folk to whom he penned his letter, successfully underwent the birth about which Jesus spoke at John 3:3-8.

          FAQ: How did they do it?

          A: Anyone can do this for themselves right now, today, wherever they are and without the assistance of clergy-- they and Christ one-on-one just as he was one-on-one with Nicodemus, and one-on-one with the Samaritan woman in the fourth chapter of John's gospel.

          The birth consists of two supernatural components; water and spirit.

          According to John 4:10-14, the water component is available simply by speaking up and requesting it.

          According to John 7:37-39, the spirit component is also available simply by speaking up and requesting it.

          In other words; both components are totally free of charge and no strings attached. The only requirement is thirst. (cf. 1Cor 12:13 and Rev 22:17)

          So, here's what you do.

          Find a private moment, and in a quiet, audible voice, speak to Christ and request the water and the spirit.

          FAQ: Jesus is way up in heaven and I'm way down here on the ground. How is he supposed to hear me?

          A: Christ is both human and divine (John 1:1-14). Don't worry, he'll hear you alright; nothing escapes his notice.
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