Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

'Citizens United Broke Our Democracy One Decade Ago. It Never Recovered.'

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 'Citizens United Broke Our Democracy One Decade Ago. It Never Recovered.'

    The election of President Donald Trump will likely define this decade, but the breakdown in our political system which sowed deeper partisan divisions and ultimately paved the way for his White House victory can be traced back to a single January day almost exactly ten years ago.

    On Jan. 21, 2010, then-Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy cast the deciding vote in the Citizens United case, which was brought by a group chaired by David Bossie, who would later serve as Trump’s deputy campaign manager.

    Kennedy wrote in the majority decision that limits on independent expenditures violated the First Amendment rights of corporations and other groups, effectively overturning spending restrictions dating back more than a century.

    . . . .

    There was certainly loads of money pumped into elections prior to Citizens United. The 2008 presidential election, which was the last national contest before the Supreme Court decision, saw about $338 million in outside spending. But the amount of outside cash injected into the presidential race skyrocketed to more than $1 billion in 2012 and $1.4 billion in 2016.





    Please don't anyone whine to me that Democrats spend big money too, the article makes that clear, should you choose to read it. The overarching point is that Citizens United was a disaster for this country and there were people who could see it at the time and their warnings have been proven all too prescient.

    Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

  • #2
    Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
    [... there were people who could see it at the time and their warnings have been proven all too prescient.

    and therefore...?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
      The election of President Donald Trump will likely define this decade, but the breakdown in our political system which sowed deeper partisan divisions and ultimately paved the way for his White House victory can be traced back to a single January day almost exactly ten years ago.

      On Jan. 21, 2010, then-Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy cast the deciding vote in the Citizens United case, which was brought by a group chaired by David Bossie, who would later serve as Trump’s deputy campaign manager.

      Kennedy wrote in the majority decision that limits on independent expenditures violated the First Amendment rights of corporations and other groups, effectively overturning spending restrictions dating back more than a century.

      . . . .

      There was certainly loads of money pumped into elections prior to Citizens United. The 2008 presidential election, which was the last national contest before the Supreme Court decision, saw about $338 million in outside spending. But the amount of outside cash injected into the presidential race skyrocketed to more than $1 billion in 2012 and $1.4 billion in 2016.





      Please don't anyone whine to me that Democrats spend big money too, the article makes that clear, should you choose to read it. The overarching point is that Citizens United was a disaster for this country and there were people who could see it at the time and their warnings have been proven all too prescient.
      When will you stop believing everything you read? It leads you into some very big mistakes. It is impossible to break the democracy in the US for the US has never been a democracy. It is a republic and always has been since the US came into existence. Our nation was designed to be a republic by our founding fathers. Stop braying about it being a democracy for the founders deliberately made sure it wasn't a democracy as democracies have demonstrated self-destructiveness every time they were created. They have turned into tyrannies by the majority all throughout history.

      Our founders guaranteed the rights of the minority by creating a republic with a constitution.

      The deliberations of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 were held in strict secrecy. Consequently, anxious citizens gathered outside Independence Hall when the proceedings ended in order to learn what had been produced behind closed doors. The answer was provided immediately. A Mrs. Powel of Philadelphia asked Benjamin Franklin, "Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?" With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin responded, "A republic, if you can keep it."

      This exchange was recorded by Constitution signer James McHenry in a diary entry that was later reproduced in the 1906 American Historical Review. Yet in more recent years, Franklin has occassionally been misquoted as having said, "A democracy, if you can keep it." The NRA's Charleton Heston quoted Franklin this way, for example, in a CBS 60 Minutes interview with Mike Wallace that was aired on December 20, 1998.
      This misquote is a serious one, since the difference between a democracy and a republic is not merely a question of semantics but is fundamental. The word "republic" comes from the Latin res publica — which means simply "the public thing(s)," or more simply "the law(s)." "Democracy," on the other hand, is derived from the Greek words demos and kratein, which translates to "the people to rule." Democracy, therefore, has always been synonymous with majority rule.


      The Founding Fathers supported the view that (in the words of the Declaration of Independence) "Men ... are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights." They recognized that such rights should not be violated by an unrestrained majority any more than they should be violated by an unrestrained king or monarch. In fact, they recognized that majority rule would quickly degenerate into mobocracy and then into tyranny. They had studied the history of both the Greek democracies and the Roman republic. They had a clear understanding of the relative freedom and stability that had characterized the latter, and of the strife and turmoil — quickly followed by despotism — that had characterized the former. In drafting the Constitution, they created a government of law and not of men, a republic and not a democracy.
      But don't take our word for it! Consider the words of the Founding Fathers themselves, who — one after another — condemned democracy.
      • Virginia's Edmund Randolph participated in the 1787 convention. Demonstrating a clear grasp of democracy's inherent dangers, he reminded his colleagues during the early weeks of the Constitutional Convention that the purpose for which they had gathered was "to provide a cure for the evils under which the United States labored; that in tracing these evils to their origin every man had found it in the turbulence and trials of democracy...."
      • John Adams, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, championed the new Constitution in his state precisely because it would not create a democracy. "Democracy never lasts long," he noted. "It soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself." He insisted, "There was never a democracy that 'did not commit suicide.'"
      • New York's Alexander Hamilton, in a June 21, 1788 speech urging ratification of the Constitution in his state, thundered: "It has been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is more false than this. The ancient democracies in which the people themselves deliberated never possessed one good feature of government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure deformity." Earlier, at the Constitutional Convention, Hamilton stated: "We are a Republican Government. Real liberty is never found in despotism or in the extremes of Democracy."
      The rest of this very fine article on what form of government our founding fathers created can be found here. It goes on to quote more of our founding fathers on what type of government they had decided to implement.
      “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.”
      ― Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

      “One and God make a majority.”
      ― Frederick Douglass

      Comment

      Working...
      X