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  • What kind of thread would you like most to respond?

    How about a nice commie thread? What about a thread on capitalism rules the world? What about a good ole atheist thread? What about God not creating miracles today? just do not tell me you would like most another Jesus is not really God thread? If that is what you want to respond to, then crawl down a gofer hole!

    There is nothing more annoying than a half-backed 'christian' who does not believe Jesus is Son of God and God, and does not understand how that is possible! If you think this idea of God being limited in being-ness, then you need to find a good mentor.

    I would rather argue with two angry cats than take more of this crazy topic. It is boring and stupid!

    So, the question is, what thread topic would interest you?

    Post your topic and let's see if it gets a response before you go off half-cocked and post a new thread, which just lies there, taking up space.

    Now, let us begin.
    So, what?

    believe it!

  • #2
    Originally posted by ok doser
    more cowbell?
    Do not sabotage my thread with nonsense. If you have a topic in mind, Write it all out, so we can all look at it.
    So, what?

    believe it!

    Comment


    • #3
      Doser, go play in your own thread please.

      I would like to see less of the half baked non trin garbage flying around.

      Comment


      • #4
        I guess this is another of my failed attempts to get things moving again on TOL?
        So, what?

        believe it!

        Comment


        • #5
          This thread is closed
          So, what?

          believe it!

          Comment


          • #6
            I banned the problem user from it so you can continue.

            Comment


            • #7
              I removed the derailment. Back to regularly scheduled programming.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok. What I an proposing is reposnding is this be a good back ally place, to try a topic before you start a new thread.

                Please note, when you start a new thread it takes up web space and if you do not get much response, you might not feel very good about it, I know I do an appropriate topic here where the forum is a bit more open to wild topics and if it gets hits, then you might want to make it into a new thread, If not and it goes flat, you might feel bad, as i do when it happens to me.

                Try anyway
                Kat
                So, what?

                believe it!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Asian stocks cheer move by China's central bank, but trade war weighs

                  Stocks across Asia advanced on Monday as China's efforts to stop sharp declines in its currency and capital flight supported wider sentiment in the region, although the escalating Sino-U.S. trade conflict has capped gains.

                  Late on Friday, the People's Bank of China raised the reserve requirement on some foreign exchange forward positions, making it more expensive to bet against the Chinese currency and helping pull the yuan away from 14-month lows.

                  The move boosted the Australian dollar <AUD=D3>, which is often played as a liquid proxy for the yuan. The Aussie came off two-week lows to climb as high as $0.7412 after the announcement, and was last at $0.7403.

                  "Leaning against bearish CNY sentiment is important because a rapidly weakening currency risks triggering residential outflows and destabilising domestic asset prices," JPMorgan analysts said in a note.

                  "Our economists think that PBOC likely will take further action if CNY depreciation continues or capital outflow pressure increases."

                  On Monday, MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan <.MIAPJ0000PUS> leapt 0.9 percent - the biggest jump in a month and its second straight session of gains.

                  Japan's Nikkei <.N225> edged up 0.4 percent, while Australian shares <.AXJO> added 0.75 percent. Chinese shares were positive too, with the blue-chip share index <.CSI300> up 0.5 percent. Hong Kong's Hang Seng gained 1.3 percent.

                  On Friday, the Dow climbed 0.54 percent, the S&P 500 gained 0.46 percent and the Nasdaq Composite added 0.12 percent. They were helped by strong corporate earnings, although gains were capped by worries over the escalating trade tensions.

                  The trade dispute remains a live issue for markets with China proposing tariffs on $60 billion worth of U.S. goods on Friday, while a senior Chinese diplomat cast doubt on prospects of talks with Washington to resolve the bitter trade conflict.
                  http://www.4-traders.com/news/Asian-...ghs--27061483/
                  So, what?

                  believe it!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    China won’t shoot itself in the foot by weaponising the yuan

                    Since June 1, the Chinese yuan has depreciated by 6 per cent against the US dollar. This depreciation has been sharp, reminding investors of the “yuan tantrums” of August 2015 and January 2016. Will Beijing use the yuan as a mercantilist tool to counter the impact of the protectionist measures from the US? Is the Chinese economy still healthy, or does this yuan depreciation – as well as weakness in the Chinese equity markets – signal a more sinister outlook for China? Could the yuan experience the types of market-destabilising and sentiment-sapping depreciations seen in 2015/16?

                    Not really. It will be quite unlikely for the Chinese authorities to adopt a mercantilist yuan policy when it has avoided doing so since the 2005 yuan float. Most of us remember how Beijing bravely held the line on the yuan during the 1997 Asian Crisis. As in 1997, this is a prime opportunity for China to build on its soft power to help turn the yuan into a genuine international and reserve currency. The value to China from branding the yuan as a nominal anchor rather than a source of instability seems much higher than potential short-term gains, if any, from a maxi-devaluation.
                    So, what?

                    believe it!

                    Comment

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