Quote Originally Posted by Nihilo View Post
But the me of my youth was actually a different person than the me right now. We think differently, feel differently, have different habits, different preferences. There are things that are the same, sure, but there are also a lot of distinctions. This is true with everybody.
How many times must a person get saved then if they become a different person every time their thinking, feelings or habits change?

You're the same person, you always been, which is a fact so ridiculously obvious that I will NOT debate it with you further. If you reject something so elementary, you're a waste of time.


I didn't bring up this classical understanding.
The test of this will be in whether you continue to use the word 'immutable' in relation to God because in theological circles, there is no other meaning.

I'm not sure it's correct to say that our Maker died.
If you reject belief in the death of God the Son, you reject your only hope for salvation. It was the death of God that made that death able to pay the sin debt of the entire human race. One simply human death would have been sufficient to pay for another man's sin but not the sin of all humans everywhere throughout history.

But we agree essentially on everything else (and we may even agree on our Maker dying; I just need to study what the Holy See says about this, if anything).
OK.
What's there to study? It's only the gospel!

John 1:14 - God the Son became a man.
Matthew 27:46 - God the Son's soul/spirit was separated from the Father (spiritual death).
John 19:30 - God the Son's soul/spirit left his physical body (physical death).

Act 3:14 But you denied the Holy One and the Just, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you, 15 and killed the Prince of life, whom God raised from the dead, of which we are witnesses.

How can you accept His resurrection without acknowledging His death? What did He resurrect from if not from being dead?

Resting in Him,
Clete