User Tag List

Page 1 of 8 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 119

Thread: Righteousness and Justification by Faith

  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266

    Righteousness and Justification by Faith

    No one will enter into heaven that does not posses the righteousness of Christ and has been justified by Christ.

    "For I am not ashamed of the Gospel: it is the power of God to every one that has faith, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. For in it the RIGHTEOUSNESS OF GOD is revealed through faith for faith; as it is written" "He who has faith shall live." Romans 1:16, 17. (RSV.

    There are two kinds of righteousness. There is the righteousness of God and there is the righteousness of man. Jesus is the righteousness of God incarnate in human flesh. This righteousness is totally and completely outside of us and is ours only by faith. It is not infused into us as Catholics teach. It is imputed to us who believe the Gospel. The righteousness of Christ is to our account, we cannot posses it yet because we are still in these sinful Adamic bodies.

    The Holy Spirit is the down payment of righteousness.

    "For we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain and not on they, but ourselves also which have the FIRST FRUITS of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our bodies" Romans 8:22, 23.

    The righteousness of man is what the Pharisees had. They thought that if they kept the law they could become righteous. The Bible does not teach that righteousness comes by doing or keeping the law or doing good works.

    "Now to him that does no works, but believes on him (Jesus) that justifies the ungodly his faith (not his works) are counted for righteousness" Romans 4:5.

    Jesus justifies the ungodly by doing for them that which they cannot do for themselves because they are sinners, Romans 3:26. He is our justifier.

    Some think that James contradicts Romans 4:5. James was a Judaizer, a Judaizer is one that believes in Jesus, but also believes that you must keep the law of Moses, Acts 15:21. It is one of the first New Testament books. James had not yet learned the Gospel and justification by faith as taught by Paul.

    Faith, not works, obedience or religion counts for righteousness. When a repentant sinner comes to Christ to be saved by him, God seals him with the Holy Spirit and places him in Christ.

    "In whom you also trusted after you heard the word of truth, the Gospel of your salvation: in whom after that you believed, you were SEALED with the Holy Spirit of promise" Ephesians 1:13.

    At that time you receive all that there is to receive. God now sees you as perfect and complete in his Son Jesus Christ, Colossians 2:10. The righteousness of Christ is to your account and will become yours when he appears. All that Jesus is and all that Jesus has done will become ours at his appearing. In Jesus Christ we have been justified, sanctified and redeemed, 1 Corinthians 1:30. All because we have faith and are not trusting in works, obedience or religion to save us.

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266
    Christianity is a faith religion, if you want to call it a religion. All of the false religions like Calvinism or Catholicism don't place much emphasis on faith. Calvinist have misdirected faith, instead of faith in Christ and his Gospel they have faith in John Calvin and predestination. The Catholics have faith in their works and the Catholic church.

    Paul said, "The Just Shall Live By Faith" Romans 1:17 Living by faith does not mean living by laws, rules or religion. It means living by faith in Christ and his Gospel, plus nothing. If you add religion to faith it is no longer faith, it is religion. There is total and complete freedom in living by faith because the object of our faith is not ourselves, it is centered in the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In the Gospel we have been justified, sanctified and redeemed, 1 Corinthians 1:30.

  3. #3
    TOL Legend beloved57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    ATL
    Posts
    17,225
    Thanks
    266
    Thanked 975 Times in 939 Posts

    Blog Entries
    2
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    51042
    You believe sinners Christ died for are sill lost and condemned, so thats not Faith in Christ, but unbelief!

  4. #4
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266
    Quote Originally Posted by beloved57 View Post
    You believe sinners Christ died for are sill lost and condemned, so thats not Faith in Christ, but unbelief!
    You have a do nothing religion. Don't respond to Christ and his Gospel will buy you a first class ticket to hell.

  5. #5
    ☞☞☞☞Presbyterian (PCA) ☜☜☜☜☞☞☞☞ A Calvinist! ☜☜☜☜☜ Ask Mr. Religion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona USA
    Posts
    6,115
    Thanks
    3,400
    Thanked 3,090 Times in 1,841 Posts

    Blog Entries
    144
    Mentioned
    79 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)



    Rep Power
    2147674
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pate View Post
    No one will enter into heaven that does not posses the righteousness of Christ and has been justified by Christ.
    Question:
    Are we justified on account of our faith?

    Spoiler

    Answer, per Robert Pate (and so many others):
    Yes

    Error!


    Justification is a declarative act in which God pronounces the sinner just or righteous, that is, declares that the claims of justice, so far as God is concerned, are satisfied, so that the sinner cannot be justly condemned, but is in justice entitled to the reward promised or due to perfect righteousness.

    The meritorious ground of justification is not faith; we are not justified on account of our faith, considered as a virtuous or holy act or state of mind. Nor are our works of any kind the ground of justification. Nothing done by us or wrought in us satisfies the demands of justice, or can be the ground or reason of the declaration that justice as far as it concerns us is satisfied. The ground of justification is the righteousness of Christ, active and passive, i.e., including His perfect obedience to the law as a covenant, and His enduring the penalty of the law in our stead and on our behalf.

    The righteousness of Christ is in justification imputed to the believer. That is, is set to his account, so that the believer is entitled to plead it at the bar of God, as though it were personally and inherently his own.

    Faith is the instrument which apprehends the righteousness of Christ. Ours is an alien righteousness, one instilled from outside ourselves, that of Christ's (1 Corinthians 1:30).

    AMR
    WARNING: Embedded link content that may be in my post above or the many embedded links my sig below are not for the faint of heart.



    Founder, Reformed Theology Institute
    AMR's Randomata Blog
    Learn Reformed Doctrine
    I fear explanations explanatory of things explained.
    Christian, catholic, Calvinist, confessional, Presbyterian (PCA).
    Lex orandi, lex credenda: everyone is a Calvinist on their knees.
    The best TOL Social Group: here.
    If your username appears in blue and you have over 500 posts:
    Why?



  6. #6
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266
    Quote Originally Posted by Ask Mr. Religion View Post
    Question:
    Are we justified on account of our faith?

    Spoiler

    Answer, per Robert Pate (and so many others):
    Yes

    Error!


    Justification is a declarative act in which God pronounces the sinner just or righteous, that is, declares that the claims of justice, so far as God is concerned, are satisfied, so that the sinner cannot be justly condemned, but is in justice entitled to the reward promised or due to perfect righteousness.

    The meritorious ground of justification is not faith; we are not justified on account of our faith, considered as a virtuous or holy act or state of mind. Nor are our works of any kind the ground of justification. Nothing done by us or wrought in us satisfies the demands of justice, or can be the ground or reason of the declaration that justice as far as it concerns us is satisfied. The ground of justification is the righteousness of Christ, active and passive, i.e., including His perfect obedience to the law as a covenant, and His enduring the penalty of the law in our stead and on our behalf.

    The righteousness of Christ is in justification imputed to the believer. That is, is set to his account, so that the believer is entitled to plead it at the bar of God, as though it were personally and inherently his own.

    Faith is the instrument which apprehends the righteousness of Christ. Ours is an alien righteousness, one instilled from outside ourselves, that of Christ's (1 Corinthians 1:30).

    AMR
    Very good. Now renounce your Calvinist religion and trust in Christ alone.

    Justification is more than a declarative act by God. Jesus is the justifier, Romans 3:26. Jesus justifies us by doing for us that which we cannot do for ourselves because we are sinners.

    Example. In our name and on our behalf he fulfills all of the demands of God's Holy Law. In our name and on our behalf he atones for our sins and the sins of the whole world, 1 John 2:2.

    We are complete "In Christ" Colossians 2:10 and now spiritually sit in heavenly places in Jesus Christ, Ephesians 2:6.

    Guess what? John Calvin didn't have a damn thing to do with it.

  7. #7
    ☞☞☞☞Presbyterian (PCA) ☜☜☜☜☞☞☞☞ A Calvinist! ☜☜☜☜☜ Ask Mr. Religion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona USA
    Posts
    6,115
    Thanks
    3,400
    Thanked 3,090 Times in 1,841 Posts

    Blog Entries
    144
    Mentioned
    79 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)



    Rep Power
    2147674
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pate View Post
    Jesus is the justifier, Romans 3:26. Jesus justifies us by doing for us that which we cannot do for ourselves because we are sinners.
    You apparently cannot read my post well, Robert. Jesus is not the justifier, God the Father is the one making the declarative of justification. It was the active and passive obedience of Jesus that forms the ground of our justification. It is God the Father imputing the righteousness of Jesus Christ to the believer.

    You apparently do not understand Romans 3:26 at all, for you have mixed up "God" (the Father), Jesus, and the one so justified.

    Dig deeper:
    https://www.biblegateway.com/verse/en/Romans%203:26

    AMR
    WARNING: Embedded link content that may be in my post above or the many embedded links my sig below are not for the faint of heart.



    Founder, Reformed Theology Institute
    AMR's Randomata Blog
    Learn Reformed Doctrine
    I fear explanations explanatory of things explained.
    Christian, catholic, Calvinist, confessional, Presbyterian (PCA).
    Lex orandi, lex credenda: everyone is a Calvinist on their knees.
    The best TOL Social Group: here.
    If your username appears in blue and you have over 500 posts:
    Why?



  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266
    Quote Originally Posted by Ask Mr. Religion View Post
    You apparently cannot read my post well, Robert. Jesus is not the justifier, God the Father is the one making the declarative of justification. It was the active and passive obedience of Jesus that forms the ground of our justification. It is God the Father imputing the righteousness of Jesus Christ to the believer.

    You apparently do not understand Romans 3:26 at all, for you have mixed up "God" (the Father), Jesus, and the one so justified.

    Dig deeper:
    https://www.biblegateway.com/verse/en/Romans%203:26

    AMR

    You Calvinist are always subverting the work of Christ. You do that because you don't have faith in him.

    Jesus is the justifier. "But to him that does NO WORKS but believes on him that JUSTIFIES THE UNGODLY his faith is counted for righteousness, Romans 4:5.

    Now tell me that Jesus is not the justifier. We are vindicated and pronounced or declared righteous because of the meritorious work of Christ.

  9. #9
    TOL Legend beloved57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    ATL
    Posts
    17,225
    Thanks
    266
    Thanked 975 Times in 939 Posts

    Blog Entries
    2
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    51042
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pate View Post
    You have a do nothing religion. Don't respond to Christ and his Gospel will buy you a first class ticket to hell.
    You don't believe in Christ. You teach sinners He died for are lost-

  10. #10
    Over 4000 post club Epoisses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    4,127
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 763 Times in 647 Posts

    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    86711
    Quote Originally Posted by Ask Mr. Religion View Post
    Question:
    Are we justified on account of our faith?

    Spoiler

    Answer, per Robert Pate (and so many others):
    Yes

    Error!


    Justification is a declarative act in which God pronounces the sinner just or righteous, that is, declares that the claims of justice, so far as God is concerned, are satisfied, so that the sinner cannot be justly condemned, but is in justice entitled to the reward promised or due to perfect righteousness.

    The meritorious ground of justification is not faith; we are not justified on account of our faith, considered as a virtuous or holy act or state of mind. Nor are our works of any kind the ground of justification. Nothing done by us or wrought in us satisfies the demands of justice, or can be the ground or reason of the declaration that justice as far as it concerns us is satisfied. The ground of justification is the righteousness of Christ, active and passive, i.e., including His perfect obedience to the law as a covenant, and His enduring the penalty of the law in our stead and on our behalf.

    The righteousness of Christ is in justification imputed to the believer. That is, is set to his account, so that the believer is entitled to plead it at the bar of God, as though it were personally and inherently his own.

    Faith is the instrument which apprehends the righteousness of Christ. Ours is an alien righteousness, one instilled from outside ourselves, that of Christ's (1 Corinthians 1:30).

    AMR
    Calvinists have to make faith into a work for their hyper-gospel to hold water. God commands faith and he commands love as well. Paul also says that the doers of the law shall be justified - Rom. 2:13 Why don't you expound that?

  11. #11
    ☞☞☞☞Presbyterian (PCA) ☜☜☜☜☞☞☞☞ A Calvinist! ☜☜☜☜☜ Ask Mr. Religion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona USA
    Posts
    6,115
    Thanks
    3,400
    Thanked 3,090 Times in 1,841 Posts

    Blog Entries
    144
    Mentioned
    79 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)



    Rep Power
    2147674
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pate View Post
    Jesus is the justifier. "But to him that does NO WORKS but believes on him that JUSTIFIES THE UNGODLY his faith is counted for righteousness, Romans 4:5.
    Robert,

    You really do have an issue interpreting Scripture properly. The "him that justifies" in that verse is God (the Father). Try reading the entire chapter dealing with the faith of Abraham and Who (God) accounted that faith unto righteousness. Then gather your wits about you after you understand the context therein.

    Read more, assert less:
    https://www.biblegateway.com/verse/en/Romans%204:5

    Keep on trying to make Jesus the one Who justifies us. It will only continue to showcase your bizarre views, including distortions of the roles of the Persons of the Godhead and what justification actually entails.

    AMR
    WARNING: Embedded link content that may be in my post above or the many embedded links my sig below are not for the faint of heart.



    Founder, Reformed Theology Institute
    AMR's Randomata Blog
    Learn Reformed Doctrine
    I fear explanations explanatory of things explained.
    Christian, catholic, Calvinist, confessional, Presbyterian (PCA).
    Lex orandi, lex credenda: everyone is a Calvinist on their knees.
    The best TOL Social Group: here.
    If your username appears in blue and you have over 500 posts:
    Why?



  12. #12
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266
    Quote Originally Posted by Ask Mr. Religion View Post
    Robert,

    You really do have an issue interpreting Scripture properly. The "him that justifies" in that verse is God (the Father). Try reading the entire chapter dealing with the faith of Abraham and Who (God) accounted that faith unto righteousness. Then gather your wits about you after you understand the context therein.

    Read more, assert less:
    https://www.biblegateway.com/verse/en/Romans%204:5

    Keep on trying to make Jesus the one Who justifies us. It will only continue to showcase your bizarre views, including distortions of the roles of the Persons of the Godhead and what justification actually entails.

    AMR

    Your Calvinist God will not allow you understand the Gospel.

    In the New Testament God remains in heaven, it is the Son that comes into the world as the new Adam to do for humanity what humanity cannot do for its self. This is why Jesus is the savior of the whole world, 1 John 2:2. Jesus provides salvation for everyone, Hebrews 2:9.

    We are justified by the doing and the dying of Jesus, who is God the Son. God the Father remains in heaven. I have shown you two scriptures that say Jesus is the justifier, you don't believe either one of them. Jesus in our name and on our behalf has fulfilled the law, Matthew 5:18 and has atoned for our sins and the sins of the whole world, 1 John 2:2. Unfortunately your Calvinist God will not allow you to believe that.

  13. #13
    ☞☞☞☞Presbyterian (PCA) ☜☜☜☜☞☞☞☞ A Calvinist! ☜☜☜☜☜ Ask Mr. Religion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona USA
    Posts
    6,115
    Thanks
    3,400
    Thanked 3,090 Times in 1,841 Posts

    Blog Entries
    144
    Mentioned
    79 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)



    Rep Power
    2147674
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pate View Post
    Your Calvinist God will not allow you understand the Gospel.
    Robert,

    Are you actually going to address the issue I have pointed out or continue to just hop about with more scripture citations?

    Let's try something different.


    Arminian theology (which was the soil from which sprang the holiness-Pentecostal movement) greatly weakens the doctrine of justification by faith. It thinks of justification only in terms of forgiveness of past sins by virtue of Christ's death. It fails to see that justification is also the imputation of Christ's life of perfect obedience to the law — an obedience which gives to the believer a full and free title to eternal life (Rom. 4:5-7; 5:10, 18, 19). Consequently, final salvation is thought to depend largely on the active obedience of the believer in his life of sanctification.

    Justification means that the righteousness of Christ is imputed to the believer and that he stands before God as if he were perfect. God must, therefore, treat him as a righteous man; and He does this by giving the believer the gift and infilling of the Spirit. What is needed, therefore, is not a "second blessing" doctrine to add to justification but a true justification which will bring every blessing in its train.

    The time has surely come for a "new" Reformation which will restore the truth of the intercession of Christ's imputed righteousness to its rightful place.

    Spoiler


    Synergism. "Do your best to serve God, Christ will make up for the deficiency, and by this you will be justified." This is how many think they should combine law and grace. John Bunyan had to meet this error in his day, so he personified this type of legalism as Ignorance in his Pilgrim's Progress:

    Christian: "How doest thou believe?

    Ignorance: "I believe that Christ died for sinners, and that I shall be justified before God from the curse, through his gracious acceptance of my obedience to his Law. Or thus, Christ makes my Duties that are Religious acceptable to his Father by virtue of his Merits; and so shall I be justified."

    Ignorance's formula for salvation may be expressed as follows:

    My obedience + Christ's merit = Salvation.

    In theology, this is called synergism. It reminds us of the story of the man who was condemned to death for embezzlement. But there was pity in the heart of the royal family. The king gave $2,000 from the treasury to make good the debt, the queen gave $1,000, and the crown prince gave $980. Then the people in the public gallery passed around the hat and gathered in $19.90. But it was of no avail, for the poor man owed $4,000. "It is no use," said the judge. "The man must be executed."

    In desperation the fellow searched his pockets and, to the applause of the spectators, produced the last vital dime from his own trouser pocket. Admittedly the last dime was not a great amount compared with the gifts of the royal family, but it was that dime which secured his reprieve. Even if we think that the contribution which we must make toward our salvation is as small as that dime, it is inevitable that it will seem more important and precious to us than the merit of Jesus Christ.

    The expression "justification by faith" can be misunderstood. It does not mean that we can be justified on account of our faith any more than we can be justified on account of regeneration, sanctification, good works, love or any other subjective quality. There is no merit in faith itself. But when faith lays hold on Christ, His perfect obedience is credited to the sinner (Rom. 4:4, 6; 5:18, 19). The saving virtue is not in the faith but in the Object of faith. Faith is merely the instrumental cause of salvation.

    As a final thrust against the tendency to glory in human achievement, the apostle Paul, in his letter to the Romans, proceeds from faith to predestination (see Rom. 9). He shows that we may believe because we have been predestined and called by God's grace. To turn this around and say that God gives grace in response to faith or that we are predestined because we believe, is to base our salvation on a quality within ourselves — and hence on legal grounds.

    Spoiler

    The source for the above is again, your mentor, Robert Brinsmead:

    http://www.presenttruthmag.com/archive/VII/7-2p1.htm


    Editorial Note:

    Of all the statements on justification by faith made throughout the history of the Christian church, it is doubtful whether Calvin's treatment in his Institutes of the Christian Religion has ever been surpassed. Calvin combines thoroughness with precision, definitive genius with remarkable brevity. In about one hundred pages he investigates every nook and cranny, and chases out practically every error and deviation from the truth of justification by faith that men have been able to dream up. It would be hard to devise a new heresy concerning justification which Calvin has not already ruthlessly refuted with the straightedge of truth.

    We here present an extract from Calvin's immortal classic on "Justification by Faith." Most of his article is not dealing with justification at the point of Christian initiation. Calvin declares that this was not the core of the argument between the better Roman Catholic scholars and the Reformers. The real argument is about the basis of acceptance with God by those who are renewed, sanctified, and filled with the Holy Spirit. Calvin very effectively shows how indwelling sin must be taken into consideration when considering the value of renewal and good works. These points are very relevant today in view of the widespread interest in the Pentecostal experience.

    Spoiler

    The source of the above Editorial is your mentor, Robert Brinsmead:

    http://www.presenttruthmag.com/archive/XIX/19-6.htm



    So if you are not going to listen to me, maybe you will listen to he who you hold in much esteem. After all, I agree with everything quoted above.

    AMR
    WARNING: Embedded link content that may be in my post above or the many embedded links my sig below are not for the faint of heart.



    Founder, Reformed Theology Institute
    AMR's Randomata Blog
    Learn Reformed Doctrine
    I fear explanations explanatory of things explained.
    Christian, catholic, Calvinist, confessional, Presbyterian (PCA).
    Lex orandi, lex credenda: everyone is a Calvinist on their knees.
    The best TOL Social Group: here.
    If your username appears in blue and you have over 500 posts:
    Why?



  14. #14
    Over 1500 post club
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,694
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 118 Times in 96 Posts

    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    92868
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Pate View Post
    Some think that James contradicts Romans 4:5. James was a Judaizer, a Judaizer is one that believes in Jesus, but also believes that you must keep the law of Moses, Acts 15:21. It is one of the first New Testament books. James had not yet learned the Gospel and justification by faith as taught by Paul.
    Many cannot reconcile James with Paul.

    Did Christ have faith? Yes.
    Did Christ also have works? Yes.

    Did Paul have faith? Yes.
    Did Paul have works? Yes.

    For someone supposedly against works, Paul worked pretty hard, and "boasted" about these.

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to iouae For Your Post:

    daqq (December 6th, 2017),God's Truth (December 6th, 2017)

  16. #15
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    11,634
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 1,064 Posts

    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rep Power
    331266
    Quote Originally Posted by Ask Mr. Religion View Post
    Robert,

    Are you actually going to address the issue I have pointed out or continue to just hop about with more scripture citations?

    Let's try something different.


    Arminian theology (which was the soil from which sprang the holiness-Pentecostal movement) greatly weakens the doctrine of justification by faith. It thinks of justification only in terms of forgiveness of past sins by virtue of Christ's death. It fails to see that justification is also the imputation of Christ's life of perfect obedience to the law — an obedience which gives to the believer a full and free title to eternal life (Rom. 4:5-7; 5:10, 18, 19). Consequently, final salvation is thought to depend largely on the active obedience of the believer in his life of sanctification.

    Justification means that the righteousness of Christ is imputed to the believer and that he stands before God as if he were perfect. God must, therefore, treat him as a righteous man; and He does this by giving the believer the gift and infilling of the Spirit. What is needed, therefore, is not a "second blessing" doctrine to add to justification but a true justification which will bring every blessing in its train.

    The time has surely come for a "new" Reformation which will restore the truth of the intercession of Christ's imputed righteousness to its rightful place.

    Spoiler


    Synergism. "Do your best to serve God, Christ will make up for the deficiency, and by this you will be justified." This is how many think they should combine law and grace. John Bunyan had to meet this error in his day, so he personified this type of legalism as Ignorance in his Pilgrim's Progress:

    Christian: "How doest thou believe?

    Ignorance: "I believe that Christ died for sinners, and that I shall be justified before God from the curse, through his gracious acceptance of my obedience to his Law. Or thus, Christ makes my Duties that are Religious acceptable to his Father by virtue of his Merits; and so shall I be justified."

    Ignorance's formula for salvation may be expressed as follows:

    My obedience + Christ's merit = Salvation.

    In theology, this is called synergism. It reminds us of the story of the man who was condemned to death for embezzlement. But there was pity in the heart of the royal family. The king gave $2,000 from the treasury to make good the debt, the queen gave $1,000, and the crown prince gave $980. Then the people in the public gallery passed around the hat and gathered in $19.90. But it was of no avail, for the poor man owed $4,000. "It is no use," said the judge. "The man must be executed."

    In desperation the fellow searched his pockets and, to the applause of the spectators, produced the last vital dime from his own trouser pocket. Admittedly the last dime was not a great amount compared with the gifts of the royal family, but it was that dime which secured his reprieve. Even if we think that the contribution which we must make toward our salvation is as small as that dime, it is inevitable that it will seem more important and precious to us than the merit of Jesus Christ.

    The expression "justification by faith" can be misunderstood. It does not mean that we can be justified on account of our faith any more than we can be justified on account of regeneration, sanctification, good works, love or any other subjective quality. There is no merit in faith itself. But when faith lays hold on Christ, His perfect obedience is credited to the sinner (Rom. 4:4, 6; 5:18, 19). The saving virtue is not in the faith but in the Object of faith. Faith is merely the instrumental cause of salvation.

    As a final thrust against the tendency to glory in human achievement, the apostle Paul, in his letter to the Romans, proceeds from faith to predestination (see Rom. 9). He shows that we may believe because we have been predestined and called by God's grace. To turn this around and say that God gives grace in response to faith or that we are predestined because we believe, is to base our salvation on a quality within ourselves — and hence on legal grounds.

    Spoiler

    The source for the above is again, your mentor, Robert Brinsmead:

    http://www.presenttruthmag.com/archive/VII/7-2p1.htm


    Editorial Note:

    Of all the statements on justification by faith made throughout the history of the Christian church, it is doubtful whether Calvin's treatment in his Institutes of the Christian Religion has ever been surpassed. Calvin combines thoroughness with precision, definitive genius with remarkable brevity. In about one hundred pages he investigates every nook and cranny, and chases out practically every error and deviation from the truth of justification by faith that men have been able to dream up. It would be hard to devise a new heresy concerning justification which Calvin has not already ruthlessly refuted with the straightedge of truth.

    We here present an extract from Calvin's immortal classic on "Justification by Faith." Most of his article is not dealing with justification at the point of Christian initiation. Calvin declares that this was not the core of the argument between the better Roman Catholic scholars and the Reformers. The real argument is about the basis of acceptance with God by those who are renewed, sanctified, and filled with the Holy Spirit. Calvin very effectively shows how indwelling sin must be taken into consideration when considering the value of renewal and good works. These points are very relevant today in view of the widespread interest in the Pentecostal experience.

    Spoiler

    The source of the above Editorial is your mentor, Robert Brinsmead:

    http://www.presenttruthmag.com/archive/XIX/19-6.htm



    So if you are not going to listen to me, maybe you will listen to he who you hold in much esteem. After all, I agree with everything quoted above.

    AMR
    I have my doubts as to whether Brinsmead wrote that. Brinsmead was not an advocate of Calvinism.

    On the day of Pentecost Peter preached the Gospel for the very first time. Those that heard and believed were saved, some of who had participated in the crucifixion of Christ, Acts 2:36. Over 8,000 Jews became Christians because they heard and believed the Gospel. "Faith comes by hearing and hearing by the word of God" Romans 10:17, which is the Gospel. I don't believe anything above, it is all hogwash.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Since 1997 TheologyOnline (TOL) has been one of the most popular theology forums on the internet. On TOL we encourage spirited conversation about religion, politics, and just about everything else.

follow us