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  • Life is fragile.

    I’ve been in two different hospitals in recent days. In one hospital, I was holding a newborn baby just entering the world and taking in those first unfamiliar breaths, and I marveled at her tiny hand wrapped around my finger. In another hospital I was holding the hand of an elderly relative, every labored breath of hers a battle, and all I could do was hold her hand - as fragile in its own way as the newborn baby’s - and tell her it’s okay, I’m here, and she’s going to be all right. I don’t know if she’s going to be all right this time, though. And even while holding her hand, I knew from past experience that it only helps so much. It’s a solitary process, that winding down of life. The beginning of life and the end of life, and in between it’s such a fragile thing.

    I was getting some of her things to take up to the hospital and I stopped to look at a picture frame on her dresser. In the photo she’s much younger, and smiling, and one of her sons has his arm around her and he’s smiling too, and no one knew then that he would die before her. He was much, much too young. Life is so fleeting. I think sometimes that time is an illusion. And I wonder if anyone wishes they knew exactly how much time they had to live. How many days, how many hours. I don’t think I want to know.

    She’d been taken to the hospital by ambulance and even though that meant she bypassed the emergency room, she was still in a long line of gurneys in the hall. When I walked through the waiting room to get to her, it was filled to overflowing, and people were waiting outside. So many suffering faces. I have a lot of respect and gratitude for doctors and nurses, but even more for the nursing assistants who do so much of the backbreaking work, and for far less pay.

    What’s going to happen in the years ahead as the baby boomers age? The first wave of boomers is just hitting the beach, and there are 70 million more who are following them. Not every aging person has family who is able to care for them, and it’s a fact of life that many of the elderly will be as helpless as babies at the end of their lives as they were at the beginning. The crisis is under the radar right now for most people, and maybe will stay that way until it gets to their family, although I’m starting to see more frequent mention of it in the media.

    Where am I going with all this? I'm not sure.

    Wherever you are in your life, try to live every moment the best that you can, because you can't have that moment back once it's gone. Each one is numbered, and each one is precious.

    Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

  • #2
    Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
    What’s going to happen in the years ahead as the baby boomers age? The first wave of boomers is just hitting the beach, and there are 70 million more who are following them.
    Well, with the tens of millions of children murdered by their feminist mothers and "doctors", there won't be the necessary people to care for them. So chaos will be close to what happens. There will not be the taxpayers needed either. It isn't like Obama voters (illegal aliens) will be paying taxes.

    Yep. Life is fragile and precious. And America is in deep, deep trouble.
    Jesus saves completely. http://www.climatedepot.com/ http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/

    Titus 1

    For there are many insubordinate, both idle talkers and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision, whose mouths must be stopped

    Ephesians 5

    11 And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather expose them. 12 For it is shameful even to speak of those things which are done by them in secret

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    • #3
      Granddaddy would say, "Life can be hard, ............ but ain't it interesting!"

      We don't tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters exist.
      They already know monsters exist.
      We tell our children fairy tales so that they will know that monsters can be killed.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post
        Wherever you are in your life, try to live every moment the best that you can, because you can't have that moment back once it's gone. Each one is numbered, and each one is precious.
        Thanks for posting this, Anna. )
        TRUST
        is a fragile thing.

        Easy to break, Easy to lose
        and one of the hardest things to
        ever get back.







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        • #5
          How vital the inner Christ.....if we have His life we shall live forever....even though we die yet shall we live.
          One lavished upon in the Beloved
          sigpic

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          • #6
            My wife is a CNA and I'm the tail end of the Boomers. They are flooding out of the bigger cities here in Texas and retiring in communities that are struggling to staff their care facilities. Private sitting is really taking off. Makes for some interesting demographics in certain towns.

            ... and now they are being followed by a small flood of crack babies.
            Some drink at the fountain of knowledge, others just gargle.

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            • #7
              My first thought? "Ah, Italian."

              Great opening post, anna, wherever it goes.
              You aren't what you eat, but you're always what you swallow.

              Pro-Life






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              • #8
                Good post, anna. And I can emphatically second this.

                I have a lot of respect and gratitude for doctors and nurses, but even more for the nursing assistants who do so much of the backbreaking work, and for far less pay.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kmoney View Post
                  Good post, anna. And I can emphatically second this.

                  I have a lot of respect and gratitude for doctors and nurses, but even more for the nursing assistants who do so much of the backbreaking work, and for far less pay.
                  Thanks, kmo. She's in intensive care and on a ventilator now.

                  Tried and waited then got tired, that's about it

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                  • #10
                    My Dad is 85, and is beginning his long goodbye. The heartbreaking thing is that he trusts me - his only child - to make the right decisions, and it is so hard. I love him so…will I have the strength to let him go when the time comes, or will I push the doctors to keep him here for my selfish loving need of him? He loved my Mom enough to say goodbye - can I do less for him?
                    Always be yourself unless you can be a unicorn. Then, always be a unicorn.


                    “And every day, the world will drag you by the hand, yelling, ‘This is important! And this is important! And this is important! You need to worry about this! And this! And this!’ And each day, it’s up to you to yank your hand back, put it on your heart and say, ‘No. This is what’s important.’” –Iain Thomas

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                    • #11
                      Wonderful post! I love life, every moment!
                      The moment I'm in is my chance to make a difference.

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                      • #12
                        There's a group of species which give birth to fragile beings, not fully capable of withstanding even the most basic of elements without parental care; not fully developed.
                        I think kangaroos have to deal with this. For whatever reason, God wants us to take exceptional care of whom we conceive.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by annabenedetti View Post

                          Where am I going with all this?
                          nice reflection anna

                          at one time I didn't believe in purgatory
                          then I visited a nursing home
                          and
                          now I believe in purgatory

                          may your kids keep you out of it
                          may your grandchildren drive you to church
                          may you have family
                          a voice crying in the wilderness :chrysost:

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                          • #14
                            I always had this idea that you should combine rest homes with day care. I mean, ideally there would be neither but, reality is there are both and I think part of what has gone lacking as of late in our culture is the interaction between grandparents and grandchildren.
                            Some drink at the fountain of knowledge, others just gargle.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fzappa13 View Post
                              I always had this idea that you should combine rest homes with day care. I mean, ideally there would be neither but, reality is there are both and I think part of what has gone lacking as of late in our culture is the interaction between grandparents and grandchildren.
                              can't tell if you are joking about this
                              but
                              that is interesting and funny
                              a voice crying in the wilderness :chrysost:

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