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QueenAtHome
December 10th, 2005, 12:26 PM
Now you can get your own baby (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00030LPWY/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/104-7927883-0368763?v=glance&s=toys&n=507846) version.

I hate these things.

Mr. 5020
December 10th, 2005, 12:28 PM
Now you can get your own baby (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00030LPWY/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/104-7927883-0368763?v=glance&s=toys&n=507846) version.

I hate these things.No, tell us how you really feel. :D

Anyways, what's the deal with these? Why do so many hate them? To me (meaning, some normal guy), they're just dolls. Am I missing something?

fool
December 10th, 2005, 12:32 PM
I didn't see the word sluts anywhere in that ad.
I didn't see any mention of the dolls sexual mores at all.

kmoney
December 10th, 2005, 12:32 PM
Anyways, what's the deal with these? Why do so many hate them? To me (meaning, some normal guy), they're just dolls. Am I missing something?

One complaint seemed to be the lack of clothes they wear...

Mr. 5020
December 10th, 2005, 12:35 PM
One complaint seemed to be the lack of clothes they wear...Seems like they dress exactly how kids dress today. I guess I would see more of a problem if parents had a problem with their kids dressing that way as well.

kmoney
December 10th, 2005, 12:37 PM
Seems like they dress exactly how kids dress today. I guess I would see more of a problem if parents had a problem with their kids dressing that way as well.
Well, I think that's the point. Girls today do dress like that. These dolls can be seen as glamorizing/promoting it.

cattyfan
December 10th, 2005, 12:38 PM
on the radio yesterday, they were talking about the trend in grade-school age girls' underwear: thongs. Why in the world would a six year-old need a thong?

fool
December 10th, 2005, 12:39 PM
What's wrong with the way they dress?
Eve wore a fig leaf.

Adam
December 10th, 2005, 12:41 PM
What's wrong with the way they dress?
Eve wore a fig leaf.Yeah, and that was her answer to sin. God's answer was quite different. Animal skins was considered 'in' by God at that point.

kmoney
December 10th, 2005, 12:42 PM
on the radio yesterday, they were talking about the trend in grade-school age girls' underwear: thongs. Why in the world would a six year-old need a thong?
:think: They don't.....

QueenAtHome
December 10th, 2005, 01:04 PM
Seems like they dress exactly how kids dress today. I guess I would see more of a problem if parents had a problem with their kids dressing that way as well.

That's part of my point. Parents don't have a problem dressing their kids this way.

Why would a loving parent promote sexual behaviour in their children, parade them for pedophiles, and promote kiddie porn?

Sozo
December 10th, 2005, 01:13 PM
Am I sinning?Would it matter to you, if you were?

Lucky
December 10th, 2005, 02:03 PM
Why in the world would a six year-old need a thong?
I guess to get good grades from their pedophilic public-school teachers. :doh:

GuySmiley
December 10th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Now you can get your own baby (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00030LPWY/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/104-7927883-0368763?v=glance&s=toys&n=507846) version.

I hate these things.
I've always thouht the same way about the Bratz dolls, I hate them. Girls do not dress that way these days, slutty girls dress that way these days.

On the other hand, I guess I dont care about thongs, as long as they are not sticking out of their pants. If a girl feels more comfortable with them then who cares. I guess at some point we could've been offended by girls underwear not covering their legs too. This is the most serious thought I've ever given to thongs, thank you for the opportunity karen! LOL

erinmarie
December 10th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Just out of curiousity Karen, where did you see these dolls first? On a commercial, or browsing through Amazon Toys?

QueenAtHome
December 10th, 2005, 02:53 PM
Just out of curiousity Karen, where did you see these dolls first? On a commercial, or browsing through Amazon Toys?

I saw them at our local Alco. They got precedence to be on the endcap with their older sisters.

Adam
December 10th, 2005, 02:55 PM
Dumb Bratz, they can't even spell. They Must go to public school, they sure dress like it.

kmoney
December 10th, 2005, 02:58 PM
:doh:

Eowyn
December 10th, 2005, 03:19 PM
Aw come on, Bratz dolls show our willingness to accept those with hideously ill-proportioned facial features. It's a wonderful display of tolerance! People with grotesquely misshapen eyes and lips are people too!

julie21
December 10th, 2005, 03:33 PM
Aw come on, Bratz dolls show our willingness to accept those with hideously ill-proportioned facial features. It's a wonderful display of tolerance! People with grotesquely misshapen eyes and lips are people too!
:think:Not many people are tolerant of Michael's looks,are they Eowyn?:chuckle:

Adam
December 10th, 2005, 03:33 PM
Aw come on, Bratz dolls show our willingness to accept those with hideously ill-proportioned facial features. It's a wonderful display of tolerance! People with grotesquely misshapen eyes and lips are people too!:chuckle:

You know what distorts their features, don't you? It's those all night, head pounding raves while hyped up on X

Redfin
December 10th, 2005, 04:14 PM
Eye-Catching-Topic-Of-The-Day! :first:

Granite
December 11th, 2005, 09:22 AM
Now you can get your own baby (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00030LPWY/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/104-7927883-0368763?v=glance&s=toys&n=507846) version.

I hate these things.

Lady, chill out.

QueenAtHome
December 11th, 2005, 11:02 AM
Lady, chill out.

Well, atleast you got the lady part right.

CRASH
December 11th, 2005, 11:36 AM
Dumb Bratz, they can't even spell. They Must go to public school, they sure dress like it.

:crackup: I would bet a million $'s these are not put out by a bunch of people who were home-schooled.

Jujubee
December 11th, 2005, 11:39 AM
Why are the dolls sluts?

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 12:30 PM
Why are the dolls sluts?They aren't, any more than a rock is hard-headed. But, they are part of a national unorganized indoctrination of young ladies that it's OK to dress sensually and attract young men, leading both down a path that leads places they would regret for their entire lives.

ShadowMaid
December 11th, 2005, 02:14 PM
I believe they also encourage the "attitude."

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 02:54 PM
:crackup: I would bet a million $'s these are not put out by a bunch of people who were home-schooled.I don't know. I've never heard of any successful product put out by a bunch of people who were home-schooled.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 03:21 PM
I don't know. I've never heard of any successful product put out by a bunch of people who were home-schooled.Ever hear of America?


Many U.S. Presidents were home schooled,
among them:


George Washington, 1st President, 16th
taught by his mother, father, and brother


John Quincy Adams, 2nd President
accompanied his father to France at 11

Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, mother of John Quincy
was taught by her clergyman father and in visits to her cultured grandparents
who had an extensive library


James Madison, 4th
taught by his grandmother until age 12


Zachary Taylor, 12th
taught at home by a tutor


Millard Fillmore, 13th
attended school for short periods; studied the Bible and a hymn
book at home (those were the basic texts of that time)


James Buchanan, 15th
learned arithmetic and bookkeeping in his father’s store


Abraham Lincoln, 16th
taught by his stepmother


Andrew Johnson, 17th
apprenticed to a tailor, learned to read at 18


Theodore Roosevelt, 26th
taught by private tutor, at 19 was sent on the Grand Tour where
he learned a few languages


Woodrow Wilson, 28th
taught at home by his father in a home full of books, in the company of cultivated minds,
until he entered college; didn’t learn to read until age 11
"What need was there to read when I could spend hours
listening to others read aloud?"


Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd
taught at home by a governess



Other Founding Fathers


Benjamin Franklin
six months of schooling at age 8; worked in father’s candle shop
at 10, father taught him to love good books, at 16 his first
essay was published


Alexander Hamilton, statesman, politician
taught by his mother and a clergyman, worked in a general store
from 12 – 16, then entered college


Patrick Henry, Revolutionary leader
informally taught reading, arithmetic, Latin, Greek ancient history
by his father
"Give me Liberty or give me Death."


George Mason, Revolutionary statesman
taught by his mother, occasionally tutored, studied law from an uncle who had
a library of 15000 volumes



Other Famous Non-Schoolers


Ansel Adams, photographer
". . . had difficulty adjusting to traditional schools. His father decided to teach him at home, and the next
years were extremely fruitful. Learning experiences were always tapped into the young boy's intrinsic
interests and ranged from playing the piano to visiting an exposition.
Years later, after he had become internationally known for his creative photography, Adams paid tribute to
the courage of a father who was willing to take risks, to listen to that "different drummer" unique to each
child. In his autobiography, Adams wrote:
'I am certain he established the positive direction of my life that otherwise, given my native hyperactivity,
could have been confused and catastrophic. I trace who I am and the direction of my development to
those years of growing up in our house on the dunes, propelled especially by an internal spark tenderly
kept alive and glowing by my father.'"
- Reader's Digest



Louisa May Alcott, author Little Women
educated by her father


Susan B. Anthony, women’s rights leader
home schooled by her father


Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of telephone
no interest in formal studies; taught by his talented mother


William Jennings Bryan, orator, statesman
until age 10, taught my his mother who stood him on a small
table to recite his lessons


Pearl Buck, author, Nobel & Pulitzer prizes
taught by her mother until she started formal school at 17


William F. Buckley, political columnists
taught at home by parents and tutors, father taught him politics
at the dinner table


Andrew Carnegie, steel manufacturer
Refused to go to school at age five so his parents kept him home. An uncle read
to him out loud. After three years he went to school, but quit a 13, later to
become one of the world’s richest men.


Charles Dickens, author, A Christmas Carol
couldn’t afford school; "passions for reading were awakened by his mother" who
also taught him English and later, Latin


Thomas Edison, inventor of light bulb, phonograph
When the teacher called him "addled," Edison’s mother told him that her son had "more sense in his little
finger than you have in your entire body." She took him out of school and taught him herself, making learning
fun for him. She bought him books of experiments; then he went off on his own. Later, he hired a staff of
educated scientists to work on the electric bulb, finally firing them all and figuring it out himself.


Robert Frost, poet, Pulitzer prize winner
disliked school so much he became physically ill; what schoolwork
he did was done at home until he passed the entrance exams
and entered high school.


General Douglas MacArthur, WWII and Korean War
taught by his mother until 13, then tutored; entered West Point with highest entrance
exams ever reported


Margaret Mead, Anthropologist
"Some years we went to school. Other years we stayed at home and Grandma taught us."
"On some days she gave me a set of plants to analyze; on others, she gave me a description and sent
me out to the woods and meadows to collect examples, say, of the 'mint family.' , , , She taught me
to read for the sense of what I read and to enjoy learning."
"Grandma . . . . seldom took more than an hour a day and left me . . . much time on my hands while
other children were in school.
One of Margaret's oldest friends told her in later years, "In my house I was a child. In your house
I was a person."
- Larry M. Arnoldsen, "On Human Learning," UHEA Newsletter, April 1991


Laura Ingalls Wilder, author, Little House on the Prairie


Brigham Young, Mormon colonizer, founder of 200 towns and villages
11 days of formal education


taken from here (http://www.homeschoolutah.org/pages/pastandpresent.htm)

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:30 PM
Ever hear of America?Only one of those (Edison) has anything to do with what I said. And I'm not sure if he applies. Did they have American public schools at that time?

Poly
December 11th, 2005, 03:30 PM
Ever hear of America?



Many U.S. Presidents were home schooled,
among them:


George Washington, 1st President, 16th
taught by his mother, father, and brother


John Quincy Adams, 2nd President
accompanied his father to France at 11

Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, mother of John Quincy
was taught by her clergyman father and in visits to her cultured grandparents
who had an extensive library


James Madison, 4th
taught by his grandmother until age 12


Zachary Taylor, 12th
taught at home by a tutor


Millard Fillmore, 13th
attended school for short periods; studied the Bible and a hymn
book at home (those were the basic texts of that time)


James Buchanan, 15th
learned arithmetic and bookkeeping in his father’s store


Abraham Lincoln, 16th
taught by his stepmother


Andrew Johnson, 17th
apprenticed to a tailor, learned to read at 18


Theodore Roosevelt, 26th
taught by private tutor, at 19 was sent on the Grand Tour where
he learned a few languages


Woodrow Wilson, 28th
taught at home by his father in a home full of books, in the company of cultivated minds,
until he entered college; didn’t learn to read until age 11
"What need was there to read when I could spend hours
listening to others read aloud?"


Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd
taught at home by a governess



Other Founding Fathers


Benjamin Franklin
six months of schooling at age 8; worked in father’s candle shop
at 10, father taught him to love good books, at 16 his first
essay was published


Alexander Hamilton, statesman, politician
taught by his mother and a clergyman, worked in a general store
from 12 – 16, then entered college


Patrick Henry, Revolutionary leader
informally taught reading, arithmetic, Latin, Greek ancient history
by his father
"Give me Liberty or give me Death."


George Mason, Revolutionary statesman
taught by his mother, occasionally tutored, studied law from an uncle who had
a library of 15000 volumes



Other Famous Non-Schoolers


Ansel Adams, photographer
". . . had difficulty adjusting to traditional schools. His father decided to teach him at home, and the next
years were extremely fruitful. Learning experiences were always tapped into the young boy's intrinsic
interests and ranged from playing the piano to visiting an exposition.
Years later, after he had become internationally known for his creative photography, Adams paid tribute to
the courage of a father who was willing to take risks, to listen to that "different drummer" unique to each
child. In his autobiography, Adams wrote:
'I am certain he established the positive direction of my life that otherwise, given my native hyperactivity,
could have been confused and catastrophic. I trace who I am and the direction of my development to
those years of growing up in our house on the dunes, propelled especially by an internal spark tenderly
kept alive and glowing by my father.'"
- Reader's Digest



Louisa May Alcott, author Little Women
educated by her father


Susan B. Anthony, women’s rights leader
home schooled by her father


Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of telephone
no interest in formal studies; taught by his talented mother


William Jennings Bryan, orator, statesman
until age 10, taught my his mother who stood him on a small
table to recite his lessons


Pearl Buck, author, Nobel & Pulitzer prizes
taught by her mother until she started formal school at 17


William F. Buckley, political columnists
taught at home by parents and tutors, father taught him politics
at the dinner table


Andrew Carnegie, steel manufacturer
Refused to go to school at age five so his parents kept him home. An uncle read
to him out loud. After three years he went to school, but quit a 13, later to
become one of the world’s richest men.


Charles Dickens, author, A Christmas Carol
couldn’t afford school; "passions for reading were awakened by his mother" who
also taught him English and later, Latin


Thomas Edison, inventor of light bulb, phonograph
When the teacher called him "addled," Edison’s mother told him that her son had "more sense in his little
finger than you have in your entire body." She took him out of school and taught him herself, making learning
fun for him. She bought him books of experiments; then he went off on his own. Later, he hired a staff of
educated scientists to work on the electric bulb, finally firing them all and figuring it out himself.


Robert Frost, poet, Pulitzer prize winner
disliked school so much he became physically ill; what schoolwork
he did was done at home until he passed the entrance exams
and entered high school.


General Douglas MacArthur, WWII and Korean War
taught by his mother until 13, then tutored; entered West Point with highest entrance
exams ever reported


Margaret Mead, Anthropologist
"Some years we went to school. Other years we stayed at home and Grandma taught us."
"On some days she gave me a set of plants to analyze; on others, she gave me a description and sent
me out to the woods and meadows to collect examples, say, of the 'mint family.' , , , She taught me
to read for the sense of what I read and to enjoy learning."
"Grandma . . . . seldom took more than an hour a day and left me . . . much time on my hands while
other children were in school.
One of Margaret's oldest friends told her in later years, "In my house I was a child. In your house
I was a person."
- Larry M. Arnoldsen, "On Human Learning," UHEA Newsletter, April 1991


Laura Ingalls Wilder, author, Little House on the Prairie


Brigham Young, Mormon colonizer, founder of 200 towns and villages
11 days of formal education





taken from here (http://www.homeschoolutah.org/pages/pastandpresent.htm)

POTD (http://www.theologyonline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=962428#post962428) :first:

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 03:31 PM
They aren't, any more than a rock is hard-headed. But, they are part of a national unorganized indoctrination of young ladies that it's OK to dress sensually and attract young men, leading both down a path that leads places they would regret for their entire lives.Don't forget who was the originator........Barbie, herself and the creators of Mattel.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:33 PM
POTD (http://www.theologyonline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=962428#post962428) :first:I did not say that there were no succesful home-schooled people. That would be ridiculous. I said I had not heard of any products produced by the aforementioned that had been successful. (truthman did point out Edison, though.)

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 03:34 PM
I did not say that there were no succesful home-schooled people. That would be ridiculous. I said I had not heard of any products produced by the aforementioned that had been successful. (truthman did point out Edison, though.):doh: :nono:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:35 PM
:doh: :nono:What are you shaking your head at? Do you know of any (besides T. Edison, of course)?

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 03:35 PM
I did not say that there were no succesful home-schooled people. That would be ridiculous. I said I had not heard of any products produced by the aforementioned that had been successful. (truthman did point out Edison, though.)America, the United States, a finished product of years of hard work and lives sacrificed.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:36 PM
America, the United States, a finished product of years of hard work and lives sacrificed.And I'm sure some of those lives were those of people who went to public school, so your point is worthless.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:37 PM
I could of sworn there was a post here by Poly, but it disappeared.

To answer the deleted question, I have not heard of any.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 03:37 PM
And I'm sure some of those lives were those of people who went to public school, so your point is worthless.Regardless, it also shows that 'unsocialized' home schoolers can work together as a team with the world to make a product that shines.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:40 PM
Regardless, it also shows that 'unsocialized' home schoolers can work together as a team with the world to make a product that shines.Only with the help of those with a "real education." :D

Actually, I don't remember being one of the people that called homeschoolers unsocialized. I mean, Lucky went to public school, and he has NO social skills.

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 03:41 PM
What are you shaking your head at? Do you know of any (besides T. Edison, of course)?I believe that the others have answered that question! It's obvious!!!!!! Don't be obtuse........

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:42 PM
I believe that the others have answered that question! It's obvious!!!!!! Don't be obtuse........I don't see any other products than those from Edison. What post are you reading?

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 03:43 PM
Only with the help of those with a "real education." :D

Actually, I don't remember being one of the people that called homeschoolers unsocialized. I mean, Lucky went to public school, and he has NO social skills.It was really nice of those professional, worldly people to let the homeschooled, unsocialized Mr. Washington have that job as President when they could have done so much better themselves.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:46 PM
It was really nice of those professional, worldly people to let the homeschooled, unsocialized Mr. Washington have that job as President when they could have done so much better themselves.Worldly? Are you saying all those educated in the public school system are worldly? Or that all those that are homeschooled are spiritual?

C'mon now, I'm not anti-homeschooling. All I said was that I could not think of any successful products made by homeschoolers. And unless we go back to Thomas Edison, you couldn't think of any either. I know homeschooling is the sacred cow around here. I'm not trying to start a war. Yet.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 03:46 PM
Don't be obtuse........I'm not sure if Mr. 5020 knows what 'obtuse' means.

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 03:47 PM
I don't see any other products than those from Edison. What post are you reading?Well, let me point out that you forgot Mr. Alexander Graham Bell..................and Mr. Andrew Carnegie. But even the others mentioned produced treasured pieces of literature as well as a solid American Heritage. You can't package that and sell it in a store, but without each one's valuable contribution, America would not be the free Country it is today.

Don't be so materialistic and obtuse..........................

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 03:48 PM
I'm not sure if Mr. 5020 knows what 'obtuse' means.Oh, sorry....this better?:loser:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:48 PM
I'm not sure if Mr. 5020 knows what 'obtuse' means.:sigh:

Were you homeschooled?

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 03:51 PM
:sigh:

Were you homeschooled?Yes.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:51 PM
Well, let me point out that you forgot Mr. Alexander Graham Bell..................and Mr. Andrew Carnegie. But even the others mentioned produced treasured pieces of literature as well as a solid American Heritage. You can't package that and sell it in a store, but without each one's valuable contribution, America would not be the free Country it is today.

Don't be so materialistic and obtuse..........................To quote truthman's source:








Andrew Carnegie, steel manufacturer
Refused to go to school at age five so his parents kept him home. An uncle read
to him out loud. After three years he went to school, but quit a 13, later to
become one of the world’s richest men.






Look like he went to school pretty much until he was 13, so that one's gone. And you're correct, I forgot about Bell. It says he was taught by his very talented mother. And I was speaking of material products the whole time.

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:52 PM
Oh, sorry....this better?:loser:Were you homeschooled?

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:53 PM
Yes.That's good. If I could have chosen, I would have chosen to be homeschooled, too. Unfortunately, that was not possible with my parents. Even if it had been, the public school would have been a much better choice.

I was in a private school for most of my education, though.

And yes, I do know what obtuse means.

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 03:55 PM
Were you homeschooled?Nope.........publik skool fer mee!

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 03:57 PM
Nope.........publik skool fer mee!Weren't you just mocking me for being public schooled? :doh:

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:02 PM
Weren't you just mocking me for being public schooled? :doh:No, mocked you for being "holier than thou"...........:angel:

:mock: :5020:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:04 PM
No, mocked you for being "holier than thou"...........:angel:

:mock: :5020:Holier than thou? What the heck are you talking about?

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:06 PM
Holier than thou? What the heck are you talking about?Nevermind......forget it.....:rolleyes:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:06 PM
Nevermind......forget it.....:rolleyes:Done.

P.S. I win.

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:08 PM
Done.

P.S. I win.no you didn't:nono:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:09 PM
no you didn't:nono: :chuckle:

I thought you were done already. Not that you ever made a point or anything. I just thought you were done trying.

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:11 PM
:chuckle:

I thought you were done already. Not that you ever made a point or anything. I just thought you were done trying. Me? :ha:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:13 PM
Me? :ha:I'm not sure which part of my quote you're referring to.

Do you mean that it is ridiculous that you would ever be done trying, or that I am the one who didn't make a point?

Perhaps you should get someone to teach you how to communicate (in their home, of course).

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:16 PM
I'm not sure which part of my quote you're referring to.

Do you mean that it is ridiculous that you would ever be done trying, or that I am the one who didn't make a point?

Perhaps you should get someone to teach you how to communicate (in their home, of course).:blabla: :yawn:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:23 PM
:blabla:That's pretty much what you've been saying the whole time.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 04:26 PM
It took Mr. 5020 a number of posts to realize that the product we were all talking about was the United States. So, later, he retorts, in superb George Costanza style, "I was speaking of material products the whole time."

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:30 PM
It took Mr. 5020 a number of posts to realize that the product we were all talking about was the United States. So, later, he retorts, in superb George Costanza style, "I was speaking of material products the whole time."Where did you get that I was unable to realize that? I even pointed out that it had nothing to do with that which I was speaking of. The fact that some of the founding fathers were homeschooled had nothing to do with my request for successful products created by the homeschooled.

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:31 PM
That's pretty much what you've been saying the whole time.I know you are, but what am I?..............:rolleyes:

Still sportin a school yard mentality I see............

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:31 PM
Where did you get that I was unable to realize that? I even pointed out that it had nothing to do with that which I was speaking of. The fact that some of the founding fathers were homeschooled had nothing to do with my request for successful products created by the homeschooled.:baby:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:31 PM
I know you are, but what am I?..............:rolleyes:

Still sportin a school yard mentality I see............Didn't you admit to starting the mockery already?

Agape4Robin
December 11th, 2005, 04:34 PM
Didn't you admit to starting the mockery already?Sheesh! :doh:
Get over it and grow up already!:dizzy:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:35 PM
You're calling me a baby? :darwinsm: Look at your arguments in this thread...

I believe that the others have answered that question! It's obvious!!!!!! Don't be obtuse........
Well, let me point out that you forgot Mr. Alexander Graham Bell..................and Mr. Andrew Carnegie. But even the others mentioned produced treasured pieces of literature as well as a solid American Heritage. You can't package that and sell it in a store, but without each one's valuable contribution, America would not be the free Country it is today.

Don't be so materialistic and obtuse..........................
Oh, sorry....this better?:loser:
No, mocked you for being "holier than thou"...........

:mock: :5020:
Then, when asked where you are coming from, you posted...
Nevermind......forget it.....

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:35 PM
Sheesh! :doh:
Get over it and grow up already!:dizzy:Ok, I will. You threw this insult at me, and I will not retaliate with one of my own. ;)

Turbo
December 11th, 2005, 04:36 PM
I don't see any other products than those from Edison. What post are you reading?
Benjamin Franklin (http://sln.fi.edu/franklin/inventor/inventor.html)

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 04:38 PM
Benjamin Franklin (http://sln.fi.edu/franklin/inventor/inventor.html)That's a good one! :thumb: Studying Ben Franklin is astounding!

I've noticed that all the inventors mentioned were from over 100 years ago. Is there anybody from the last 100 years or so?

2ephesians8
December 11th, 2005, 05:17 PM
Whoa!
I would never have imagined that a thread entitled raising sluts would turn into a discussion about Ben Franklin!!!

Zoiks!

What the world needs now is a Ben Franklin Bratz!! ???

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 05:18 PM
Whoa!
I would never have imagined that a thread entitled raising sluts would turn into a discussion about Ben Franklin!!!

Zoiks!

What the world needs now is a Ben Franklin Bratz!! ???:chuckle:

Welcome to TOL...

erinmarie
December 11th, 2005, 05:23 PM
Here's some info on the 'creator' of Bratz Dolls, to sort of get back to subject. I can't find if he was homeschooled or not.





Isaac Larian


CEO (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery;jsessionid=2uq9c7r3amomw?method=4&dsid=2222&dekey=Chief+executive+officer&gwp=8&curtab=2222_1&sbid=lc04a) of MGA Entertainment. Named by Ernst & Young's "Entrepreneur of the Year" (Consumer Products category) in 2004.


Born March 28, 1954 in Kashan, Iran. Creator of the enormously successful Bratz Dolls, whose edgy looks and clothing sent Barbie to her grave. The 51-year-old Iranian immigrant has done what no one else in the $20 billion toy industry has been able to: generate explosive growth in a tough category while also sending Barbie -- a 46-year-old American icon -- scampering to the salon for a makeover. Since their introduction in June, 2001, the Bratz dolls, with their big eyes and skimpy clothes, have grown into a billion-dollar franchise. Although Mattel has designed new, edgier dolls that are intended, as Bratz are, for older girls, Barbie sales have fallen, and the company's stock price has moved sideways. After emigrating to Los Angeles at age 17 with $750 in his pocket, he found a job washing dishes at a diner and eventually earned a civil engineering degree from the California State University at Los Angeles. Just after college, Larian started the company that morphed into MGA. He imported consumer electronics and in 1987 scored big with a line of handheld games featuring characters licensed from Nintendo Corp. (NTDOY ) Ten years later he sold his first doll, Singing Bouncing Baby.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 05:54 PM
He wasn't homeschooled...

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 05:55 PM
He wasn't homeschooled...How'd you find out? I Googled the heck outta his name and couldn't find anything.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 05:58 PM
http://bratz-world.diaryland.com/DMinterview.html

I guess I'm just a better googler than you! :nananana:

SOTK
December 11th, 2005, 05:59 PM
Dumb Bratz, they can't even spell. They Must go to public school, they sure dress like it.

I knew it would only take a New York minute for that to come out. :rolleyes:

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 06:01 PM
:doh: nevermind.....

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 06:03 PM
http://bratz-world.diaryland.com/DMinterview.html

I guess I'm just a better googler than you! :nananana:That article is about his PR guy, not him.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 06:06 PM
That article is about his PR guy, not him.
I know I saw that.....

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 06:10 PM
I'm not sure if Mr. 5020 knows what 'obtuse' means.
:doh:

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 06:11 PM
Oh, sorry....this better?:loser:
:doh:

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 06:12 PM
kmoney, that Kramer as your avatar just freaks me out man

I'm serious, everytime you make a post, I mentally picture Kramer saying the words in your post.

And my family wonders why I laugh while at TOL.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 06:14 PM
kmoney, that Kramer as your avatar just freaks me out man

I'm serious, everytime you make a post, I mentally picture Kramer saying the words in your post.

And my family wonders why I laugh while at TOL.
:chuckle: anything is funner when he says it...

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 06:19 PM
Kramerica!

Zimfan
December 11th, 2005, 09:21 PM
:chuckle: anything is funner when he says it...

:shocked: Did Kramer just refer to himself in the third person?

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 09:25 PM
Kramer doesn't do that. Kramer thinks people that do that are crazy. :chuckle:

Zimfan
December 11th, 2005, 09:42 PM
:confused: What is everyone harassing Mr.5020 for? All he said was


I don't know. I've never heard of any successful product put out by a bunch of people who were home-schooled.

I would think that the use of the word "product" and the fact that the post he was replying to was about a commercial product would make the meaning of his post clear. He wasn't insulting homeschoolers, he was just expressing his belief that the the odds of any particular successful commercial product being put out by a group of home schoolers is slim. Given the relatively low number of people homeschooled in this country, he's probably right.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 09:47 PM
Talk about being obtuse!

;)

Zimfan
December 11th, 2005, 09:57 PM
Talk about being obtuse!

;)

Speaking of the word obtuse, I have a sudden urge to make a note that may get me in trouble. The only friend(excepting a few people whose first language was not English) I've had who did not know the meaning of the word obtuse was home-schooled. He also proved the quality of his home-schooling(lack thereof, actually) by asking another friend whether there was ever a "renaissance in Italy". :freak:

Mr. 5020
December 11th, 2005, 10:04 PM
Speaking of the word obtuse, I have a sudden urge to make a note that may get me in trouble. The only friend(excepting a few people whose first language was not English) I've had who did not know the meaning of the word obtuse was home-schooled. He also proved the quality of his home-schooling(lack thereof, actually) by asking another friend whether there was ever a "renaissance in Italy". :freak:I haven't met that many homeschoolers here, but I do know two of them personally. One is brilliant, but has the social skills of a french fry. The other is tons of fun to hang out with, but is about as bright as a french fry.

Zimfan
December 11th, 2005, 10:09 PM
The one I know seems to have the intelligence of a french fry but somewhat better social skills, maybe on par with a chicken mcnugget.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 10:10 PM
:chew: I'm getting hungry....

SOTK
December 11th, 2005, 10:18 PM
:confused: What is everyone harassing Mr.5020 for? All he said was



I would think that the use of the word "product" and the fact that the post he was replying to was about a commercial product would make the meaning of his post clear. He wasn't insulting homeschoolers, he was just expressing his belief that the the odds of any particular successful commercial product being put out by a group of home schoolers is slim. Given the relatively low number of people homeschooled in this country, he's probably right.

I was wondering the same thing and was thinking about making a similar point.

I sometimes just do not get the homeschoolers around here. A lot of them (not all) are constantly on the attack or on the defensive. Not only that, but can go to great lengths to justify their reasonings for homeschooling. If anybody should feel insulted around here, it is me and all the rest of the Christians who have chose to send their kids to school. You don't see me or very many other posters starting threads to attack the homeschoolers here. It's quite the opposite.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 10:21 PM
I've known a few homeschoolers. They were all pretty intelligent. Never hung out with them though so....

SOTK
December 11th, 2005, 10:29 PM
I've known a few homeschoolers. They were all pretty intelligent. Never hung out with them though so....

Me too..I've known intelligent homeschoolers and dumb ones. I've known intelligent kids and adults who went through public education and some dumb ones. I've also known trouble makers and criminals on both sides of the fence. One of the worst criminals I have ever seen come in the Juvenile Justice System in 10 years was homeschooled. Does that make all homeschoolers criminals? Certainly not! I wish some people here would start giving me a little consideration and respect. The assumptions and overgeneralizations are old.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 10:32 PM
I was wondering the same thing and was thinking about making a similar point.

I sometimes just do not get the homeschoolers around here. A lot of them (not all) are constantly on the attack or on the defensive. Not only that, but can go to great lengths to justify their reasonings for homeschooling. If anybody should feel insulted around here, it is me and all the rest of the Christians who have chose to send their kids to school. You don't see me or very many other posters starting threads to attack the homeschoolers here. It's quite the opposite.As you know, I answered Mr. 5020's question earlier about my own homeschooling experience. He asked if I was homeschooled, and I answered "Yes".

He, however, did not ask if I was homeschooled all 12 years.

My first 2 1/2 years were in public school. In those 2 1/2 years (from K, 1st and 1/2 of 2nd grade), I learned all the major cuss words, how sex was done, learned about evolution, and was introduced to pornography and bullies. What a disaster!

And this was in the early 1980s. I can't imagine how bad it is today.

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 10:34 PM
Me too..I've known intelligent homeschoolers and dumb ones. I've known intelligent kids and adults who went through public education and some dumb ones. I've also known trouble makers and criminals on both sides of the fence. One of the worst criminals I have ever seen come in the Juvenile Justice System in 10 years was homeschooled. Does that make all homeschoolers criminals? Certainly not! I wish some people here would start giving me a little consideration and respect. The assumptions and overgeneralizations are old.
:thumb:

koban
December 11th, 2005, 10:36 PM
Any homeschool boosters out there interested in telling me their take on parochial schools?

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 10:39 PM
Any homeschool boosters out there interested in telling me their take on parochial schools?Catholic run? Church run? Or otherwise?

kmoney
December 11th, 2005, 10:42 PM
Catholic run? Church run? Or otherwise?
I did much of my schooling in Christian schools, ran by our churches.

koban
December 11th, 2005, 10:43 PM
Catholic run? Church run? Or otherwise?


Either.

I have a few friends/acquaintances who went to Catholic school. They were, in college, wilder than the friends I knew from my suburban public school experience.

No experience with non-Catholic church run schools - don't think they're very big around here. Neither's home-schooling, that I'm aware of.

Zimfan
December 11th, 2005, 10:47 PM
As you know, I answered Mr. 5020's question earlier about my own homeschooling experience. He asked if I was homeschooled, and I answered "Yes".

He, however, did not ask if I was homeschooled all 12 years.

My first 2 1/2 years were in public school. In those 2 1/2 years (from K, 1st and 1/2 of 2nd grade), I learned all the major cuss words, how sex was done, learned about evolution, and was introduced to pornography and bullies. What a disaster!

And this was in the early 1980s. I can't imagine how bad it is today.

I've gone to public school(counting college) for 16 years now. I heard more curse words in church(or from people who went to our church), learned almost nothing about sex barring a single health class that went far more into describing the changes brought about by puberty than anything else, learned almost nothing about evolution(it wasn't really taught in biology class, not even at the college level), was introduced to pornograph by a home-schooler, and met as many or more bullies at church as at school. This was in the 90's

SOTK
December 11th, 2005, 10:47 PM
As you know, I answered Mr. 5020's question earlier about my own homeschooling experience. He asked if I was homeschooled, and I answered "Yes".

He, however, did not ask if I was homeschooled all 12 years.

My first 2 1/2 years were in public school. In those 2 1/2 years (from K, 1st and 1/2 of 2nd grade), I learned all the major cuss words, how sex was done, learned about evolution, and was introduced to pornography and bullies. What a disaster!

And this was in the early 1980s. I can't imagine how bad it is today.

Truthman,

I respect your experience. I truly do. You made a personal and intelligent decision based on your experience as a parent. There is nothing wrong with that. In fact, it was the right thing to do, and I applaud you. The key word or words here is your experience and your decision. I'm repeating myself here, but in the particular state I am living in, in the particular city I'm living in, and in the particular school district I am living in is different than your experience. This is what I mean by gross overgeneralizations and assumptions. You can't do that. It would be like me (say I am a non-believer) going to my first church and witnessing legalism and dysfunction and then accusing all Christians and all churches of being legalistic and dysfunctional.

The fact of the matter is that I am very happy with my kid's education thus far. I like the teachers and curriculum. I am also very involved. Health, evolution, and all that other crap that most of you state gets taught hasn't come up at all and my daughter will be going into the 6th grade next year. I also get somewhat of a say in what they learn. I am also very pleased with my school district's Excel program. Both of my kids are in "Honor" classes. Next year, they will be going to "school" in an entirely different building from the rest of the school. This is all positive stuff, and I support it. My kids have not experienced what you say you experienced socially at school. My kids are getting excellent grades and their behavior is superb. Not only that, they have made several friends which have gone with us to Church. So far, school has been a positive experience for them all the way around.

Zimfan
December 11th, 2005, 10:48 PM
:doh:
You have given out too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 11:26 PM
I've gone to public school(counting college) for 16 years now. I heard more curse words in church(or from people who went to our church), learned almost nothing about sex barring a single health class that went far more into describing the changes brought about by puberty than anything else, learned almost nothing about evolution(it wasn't really taught in biology class, not even at the college level), was introduced to pornograph by a home-schooler, and met as many or more bullies at church as at school. This was in the 90'sYeah, but that happened outside your home. In the homeschool, little to nothing happens without parental involvement. I never said homeschoolers were perfect.

Adam
December 11th, 2005, 11:29 PM
Truthman,

I respect your experience. I truly do. You made a personal and intelligent decision based on your experience as a parent. There is nothing wrong with that. In fact, it was the right thing to do, and I applaud you. The key word or words here is your experience and your decision. I'm repeating myself here, but in the particular state I am living in, in the particular city I'm living in, and in the particular school district I am living in is different than your experience. This is what I mean by gross overgeneralizations and assumptions. You can't do that. It would be like me (say I am a non-believer) going to my first church and witnessing legalism and dysfunction and then accusing all Christians and all churches of being legalistic and dysfunctional.

The fact of the matter is that I am very happy with my kid's education thus far. I like the teachers and curriculum. I am also very involved. Health, evolution, and all that other crap that most of you state gets taught hasn't come up at all and my daughter will be going into the 6th grade next year. I also get somewhat of a say in what they learn. I am also very pleased with my school district's Excel program. Both of my kids are in "Honor" classes. Next year, they will be going to "school" in an entirely different building from the rest of the school. This is all positive stuff, and I support it. My kids have not experienced what you say you experienced socially at school. My kids are getting excellent grades and their behavior is superb. Not only that, they have made several friends which have gone with us to Church. So far, school has been a positive experience for them all the way around.SOTK. I think we're pretty close doctrinally. We don't believe people should go to any old church. We challenge people to go to churches that teach the truth about grace and God's character and attributes. So, why would we say that about church but not about the schools they go to?

Secondly, all that stuff I mentioned about my public school experience? I never once told my parents, even to this day (I'm 31) that any of it happened. They didn't have a clue. I'm just concerned about what people's kids have seen and learned but haven't mentioned to mom and dad.

Redfin
December 12th, 2005, 02:24 PM
I don't know. I've never heard of any successful product put out by a bunch of people who were home-schooled.

The kind of individuals truthman listed are the "product."

Mr. 5020
December 12th, 2005, 03:35 PM
The kind of individuals truthman listed are the "product."Are you saying their parents were homeschooled?

Agape4Robin
December 12th, 2005, 03:39 PM
The kind of individuals truthman listed are the "product."Redfin........:nono: don't try.......you will find yourself caught up in a circular arguement!:juggle:

beefalobilly
December 12th, 2005, 04:46 PM
As you know, I answered Mr. 5020's question earlier about my own homeschooling experience. He asked if I was homeschooled, and I answered "Yes".

He, however, did not ask if I was homeschooled all 12 years.

My first 2 1/2 years were in public school. In those 2 1/2 years (from K, 1st and 1/2 of 2nd grade), I learned all the major cuss words, how sex was done, learned about evolution, and was introduced to pornography and bullies. What a disaster!

And this was in the early 1980s. I can't imagine how bad it is today.

I didn't learn about evolution until my pastor told me not to believe it :chuckle:

Redfin
December 12th, 2005, 05:25 PM
Are you saying their parents were homeschooled?

No, I'm implying that your question misses a more relevant point.

julie21
December 12th, 2005, 06:04 PM
My first 2 1/2 years were in public school. In those 2 1/2 years (from K, 1st and 1/2 of 2nd grade), I learned all the major cuss words, how sex was done, learned about evolution, and was introduced to pornography and bullies. What a disaster!

And this was in the early 1980s. I can't imagine how bad it is today.
So this is the reason to take a child out of the world and shelter it from the reality of what it is like to live here? The world is not Heaven, never will be, yet your children have an opportunity to teach others that Heaven can be theirs one day by being an example and teaching their peers another way..the right way.
A child can learn all the cuss words there are merely travelling on a bus or train or walking through the Mall or hearing neighbours yell them out.
Our children heard cuss words coming from within their own home when we were not a Christian family - not on a regular basis but now and then. They also heard it at their Public School ( one completed their final year a year ago and one 2 years off that), at the local shopping centre, on the transport system and coming from the world that we live in.
However, we brought them up, even as non-Christians, to know that it was not acceptable behaviour to cuss, anywhere or at any time and they, thankfully held to that.
Now we are Christian, they do not hear it within our home anymore but do still hear it within the world.The same with sex, pornography, bullying etc etc. Now, my daughter within the Public school system is able to impart to those she mingles with who cuss ( we use the term 'swear' here in Oz) or see being sexually active at 16 as being a necessary step to acceptance from peers or liken it to 'love', the Truth as denoted in the Bible. She is acting as salt and light for those who she mingles with and it is working, for several of the aforementioned students now attend the lunchtime Christian group and come to the Youth Church we hold on Sunday nights....and there will be more. She is in the world but not of the world, which Jesus calls us to be.
If I had taken her out of the Public system ( which has also allowed her to be educationally extended so that she is completing 2 final year subjects a year ahead of time and excelling in all areas studied), to become home schooled, then she would not have had the opportunity to show others and tell others what the Lord wants them to hear and for them to be turned away from the wrong gate they were heading to.
How does one better change a system than from within the system itself?
We taught our kids what was right, even when we ourselves were doing wrong. Now, as Christians, they teach others they come in contact with the right way. That is what the Lord wants us to do.
All of the above will no doubt draw flack from many here but I only state it as I have seen it and believe to be true for us. If you choose to Home school , it is entirely up to you as a parent. :)

erinmarie
December 12th, 2005, 06:39 PM
You know what? I don't think that 'sheltering' our children is such a bad thing really. You hold these children near and dear, care for them as infants, train them manners, with love and patience, teach them tools of life...and then at a very tender age we're expected to usher them out of our houses, thrust into the world out there. Not the 'real world', but the world manufactured by the teachers, principals, aides, bus drivers, school nurses etc...etc...

When I was 4 I went to all-day kindergarten at a private school for gifted children. I had to wake up at 6 a.m., get dressed, eat in a hurry, if there was time to eat at all, catch a bus, (also a side note here, I rode the bus by myself for a good ten minutes everyday, with one male driver). We had lessons throughout the day, 45 minutes for lunch, two bathroom breaks and 30 minutes playtime. I remember feeling that we were discouraged from asking to go to the bathroom, so that breaks would be limited, and I remember feeling that I missed my mother and new baby brother very much.

I have mentioned in other threads that I loved high school, and I had a blast there. But, I was rushed, badgered, my feelings were hurt, things my parents taught me were not only questioned by teachers, they were often ridiculed. I was stalked by a young man in the 10th grade after turning him down when he asked me to a dance. He followed me between classes and sometimes even rode my bus home from school.

I really don't think the importance of homeschooling and staying at home with your children lies in sheltering them from swearing, or sex, or crazy clothes. The importance lies in the great weight of safety and security we are indebted to create for our children. At the risk of sounding cliche, our children aregreat gifts to be cared for and molded in His image. Why would we take the chance that someone would hurt them, break them down, kill them, rape them, or even simply, make them sad?

Adam
December 12th, 2005, 08:34 PM
So this is the reason to take a child out of the world and shelter it from the reality of what it is like to live here? The world is not Heaven, never will be, yet your children have an opportunity to teach others that Heaven can be theirs one day by being an example and teaching their peers another way..the right way.
A child can learn all the cuss words there are merely travelling on a bus or train or walking through the Mall or hearing neighbours yell them out.
Our children heard cuss words coming from within their own home when we were not a Christian family - not on a regular basis but now and then. They also heard it at their Public School ( one completed their final year a year ago and one 2 years off that), at the local shopping centre, on the transport system and coming from the world that we live in.
However, we brought them up, even as non-Christians, to know that it was not acceptable behaviour to cuss, anywhere or at any time and they, thankfully held to that.
Now we are Christian, they do not hear it within our home anymore but do still hear it within the world.The same with sex, pornography, bullying etc etc. Now, my daughter within the Public school system is able to impart to those she mingles with who cuss ( we use the term 'swear' here in Oz) or see being sexually active at 16 as being a necessary step to acceptance from peers or liken it to 'love', the Truth as denoted in the Bible. She is acting as salt and light for those who she mingles with and it is working, for several of the aforementioned students now attend the lunchtime Christian group and come to the Youth Church we hold on Sunday nights....and there will be more. She is in the world but not of the world, which Jesus calls us to be.
If I had taken her out of the Public system ( which has also allowed her to be educationally extended so that she is completing 2 final year subjects a year ahead of time and excelling in all areas studied), to become home schooled, then she would not have had the opportunity to show others and tell others what the Lord wants them to hear and for them to be turned away from the wrong gate they were heading to.
How does one better change a system than from within the system itself?
We taught our kids what was right, even when we ourselves were doing wrong. Now, as Christians, they teach others they come in contact with the right way. That is what the Lord wants us to do.
All of the above will no doubt draw flack from many here but I only state it as I have seen it and believe to be true for us. If you choose to Home school , it is entirely up to you as a parent. :)Would you let your child participate in 'missionary dating'? That's where a believer dates a non-believer in hopes that they'll 'get saved'.

If you wouldn't do that, then why would you let them do missionary schooling?????

erinmarie, THANK YOU!

kmoney
December 12th, 2005, 08:36 PM
:nono: you can't compare the two...

julie21
December 12th, 2005, 10:22 PM
:nono: you can't compare the two...
Exactly kmoney!


Truthman: If you wouldn't do that, then why would you let them do missionary schooling?????
Have you read the OT story of Hosea and Gomer by chance???
I know of couples who were unevenly yoked and their partners have been saved...thankyou Jesus!

Erinmarie: Not the 'real world', but the world manufactured by the teachers, principals, aides, bus drivers, school nurses etc...etc...
Mmmm...sorry, but that sounds like the 'real world' to me EM.
My children were both sheltered and protected by their father and I...not flung to the wolves. However, the 'protection' we gave them was that of having a loving home to come back to once the school day was over and included in that was the chance for them to tell us what had happened during their day and for us to help them find ways to deal with the reality of living in the environment they were in and how to help change from within things that may not have been right for them and others.
Protection also came from us as parents discussing with the relevant teachers anything that was detrimental to our children's growing into the caring, confident, Christian individuals they have both managed to become, even though Publically schooled.

Adam
December 12th, 2005, 10:33 PM
Have you read the OT story of Hosea and Gomer by chance???
I know of couples who were unevenly yoked and their partners have been saved...thankyou Jesus!OK, so, just because somebody in the Bible did something, that makes it OK for everyone? If that's the case, then I'm off to build an ark.

The story of Hosea and Gomer had a spiritual lesson tied to it, namely, that God was again taking Israel, His whoring bride as His wife. That has absolutely nothing to do with today.

QueenAtHome
December 12th, 2005, 10:42 PM
I grew up and attended all my schooling in a nice little suburb. I wasn't exposed to the evils of an inner-city school.

Before I entered high school I had: witnessed 2 drug raids, a girl escorted by ambulance from a school sponsored chaperoned dance because of alcohol poisoning, and walked in on a guy and gal having sex.

In high school I learned how to "safely"" have oral sex by a school sponsored sex-ed assembly.

Years later, my sister was locked in a classroom for hours while her co-workers and friends ran for their lives at the neighboring Columbine high school.

I choose not to expose my children to that.

BTW, missionaries are trained before ever going out amongst the natives.

Mr. 5020
December 12th, 2005, 10:52 PM
No, I'm implying that your question misses a more relevant point.Perhaps a better point, but certainly not more relevant. It's completely irrelevant, actually.

julie21
December 13th, 2005, 02:24 AM
I grew up and attended all my schooling in a nice little suburb. I wasn't exposed to the evils of an inner-city school.

Before I entered high school I had: witnessed 2 drug raids, a girl escorted by ambulance from a school sponsored chaperoned dance because of alcohol poisoning, and walked in on a guy and gal having sex.

In high school I learned how to "safely"" have oral sex by a school sponsored sex-ed assembly.

Years later, my sister was locked in a classroom for hours while her co-workers and friends ran for their lives at the neighboring Columbine high school.

I choose not to expose my children to that.
BTW, missionaries are trained before ever going out amongst the natives.And that is your choice. Of course, the events that you outlined above are not everyday events that happen in every Public school.
By the way, yes, missionaries are trained before going out to do their trips etc, ( it wasn't me who brought 'missionaries' up though, BTW} but God calls us all to be missionaries to the people of the world we live in...just as the disciples were untrained Fishermen become missionaries. :)

julie21
December 13th, 2005, 02:27 AM
If that's the case, then I'm off to build an ark.
If that's what you want to do, then go ahead. Should be fun!
Hey, let me know when you do and I'll get a magazine to come and do a story on it. ;)

Jujubee
December 13th, 2005, 09:56 AM
Now you can get your own baby (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00030LPWY/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/104-7927883-0368763?v=glance&s=toys&n=507846) version.

I hate these things.


Can't we change the thread title.. It seems so harsh...

Granite
December 13th, 2005, 10:36 AM
I grew up and attended all my schooling in a nice little suburb. I wasn't exposed to the evils of an inner-city school.

Before I entered high school I had: witnessed 2 drug raids, a girl escorted by ambulance from a school sponsored chaperoned dance because of alcohol poisoning, and walked in on a guy and gal having sex.

In high school I learned how to "safely"" have oral sex by a school sponsored sex-ed assembly.

Years later, my sister was locked in a classroom for hours while her co-workers and friends ran for their lives at the neighboring Columbine high school.

I choose not to expose my children to that.

BTW, missionaries are trained before ever going out amongst the natives.

Wanna hear about what I saw at a good parochial school?

No side's completely clean. Schools are schools. Put a bucket of teenagers together every single day and hell will break loose sooner or later.

QueenAtHome
December 13th, 2005, 10:48 AM
No side's completely clean. Schools are schools. Put a bucket of teenagers together every single day and hell will break loose sooner or later.

Now, I think you are understanding why I homeschool my children.

Granite
December 13th, 2005, 10:53 AM
I was home schooled till ninth grade, I know the reasons behind it. And I think it's a good idea for some people but not everyone.

Gerald
December 13th, 2005, 10:57 AM
Y'know, an interesting expansion to this thread would be to address the issue of "raising thugs".

I spent my formative years in a military academy, so unbridled thuggery is not unfamiliar to me.

QueenAtHome
December 13th, 2005, 10:58 AM
Can't we change the thread title.. It seems so harsh...

Na.
One thing I learned from my older brother was that sometimes getting to the point (even if it is blunt and harsh) is much more effective than beating around the bush for hours.

beanieboy
December 13th, 2005, 11:23 AM
So, you see pictures like this, and say, "What a slut!"?

http://altura.speedera.net/ccimg.catalogcity.com/200000/202400/202406/Products/7000081.jpg

Karen - you need to take your meds.

Granite
December 13th, 2005, 11:33 AM
No kidding.

death2impiety
December 13th, 2005, 11:40 AM
I love the title of this thread.

beanieboy
December 13th, 2005, 11:52 AM
Disappointed that it wasn't an instructional manual?

beanieboy
December 13th, 2005, 12:00 PM
You have problems with Anne Geddes babies?
Do you yell "Slut!" to the 1year old girl running around in just her diaper?

Adam
December 13th, 2005, 12:04 PM
Actually, karen and I despise the Anne Geddes art.

erinmarie
December 13th, 2005, 12:17 PM
Awwww!!! I love the Anne Geddes babies! I decorated the girls' room in Anne Geddes posters.

I think there's a big difference between beautiful, timeless and classic photos and brash and blatant 'trendiness'.

Adam
December 13th, 2005, 12:52 PM
Awwww!!! I love the Anne Geddes babies! I decorated the girls' room in Anne Geddes posters.

I think there's a big difference between beautiful, timeless and classic photos and brash and blatant 'trendiness'.I didn't say we despise them because they're immoral or anything, we just don't like them.

Knight
December 13th, 2005, 12:57 PM
Somebody gave us an Anne Geddes book once.

I have to admit it was a bit strange.

OK, so ya take a few cute pictures of some naked babies in funny settings - I guess I get that. But after the first few images it starts to get a bit monotonous and odd.

erinmarie
December 13th, 2005, 12:58 PM
:cry:

beanieboy
December 13th, 2005, 01:45 PM
The thing is, the babies are naked, and no one says, "OH MY GOD! THEY'RE NAKED!"

But I have to agree - they're creepy. They are coming out of everywhere - flower pots, ears of corn - it's like you are infested with babies. And they have an element of "fer cuuuuuute" girliniess to them that only a purple unicorn running under a rainbow can surpass.

Knight
December 13th, 2005, 01:52 PM
The thing is, the babies are naked, and no one says, "OH MY GOD! THEY'RE NAKED!"

But I have to agree - they're creepy. They are coming out of everywhere - flower pots, ears of corn - it's like you are infested with babies. And they have an element of "fer cuuuuuute" girliniess to them that only a purple unicorn running under a rainbow can surpass.I don't freak out when I see a picture of a naked baby and I don't know anyone who does. However, making a living taking pictures of naked babies does strike me as a bit odd.

beanieboy
December 13th, 2005, 02:07 PM
It's not the nakedness as much as having them as bees or coming out of peapods.
It's somewhere between being invaded by rats/squirrels/mice etc and someone who keeps wanting to show you pictures of their grandchildren. "It's that just precious???"

But the link that I showed is similar to the Bratz doll.

Knight
December 13th, 2005, 02:11 PM
I think the Bratz dolls are asinine. They are sluts to be sure.

My daughters have seen them in stores and think they are weird.

No Bratz dolls in my house.

beanieboy
December 13th, 2005, 02:16 PM
I think the Bratz dolls are asinine. They are sluts to be sure.

My daughters have seen them in stores and think they are weird.

No Bratz dolls in my house.

What about Barbie?
Is she a skank?

And are the girls guilty of being sluts because they have sex with G.I. Joe, or are they being judged simply by outer appearance?
And that is a good thing to teach children?

Knight
December 13th, 2005, 02:20 PM
What about Barbie?
Is she a skank?I would ask Ken but he is a homo (http://www.theologyonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3521).

fool
December 13th, 2005, 03:26 PM
I would ask Ken but he is a homo (http://www.theologyonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3521).
Maybe someone could invent "Theonomy Bob" and he could execute Ken for his unrepentent homoness.

Gerald
December 13th, 2005, 03:36 PM
Maybe someone could invent "Theonomy Bob" and he could execute Ken for his unrepentent homoness.:: pictures somebody buying up all the Ken dolls in town, lining them up against a wall and shooting them with a .22 ::

:Grizzly:

kmoney
December 13th, 2005, 04:36 PM
Maybe someone could invent "Theonomy Bob" and he could execute Ken for his unrepentent homoness.
:rotfl:

kmoney
December 13th, 2005, 04:57 PM
You have problems with Anne Geddes babies?
Do you yell "Slut!" to the 1year old girl running around in just her diaper?
I don't think you can compare the two. Those dolls are taking babies and depicting them as older girls and dressing them in provative clothing. I really don't think they will promote any sluttiness in the girls who play with them, but I also think the comparison to that picture you posted is off base.

Redfin
December 14th, 2005, 12:23 AM
Maybe someone could invent "Theonomy Bob" and he could execute Ken for his unrepentent homoness.

I have to admit, that's pretty funny, sorta, kinda... :crackup:

koban
December 14th, 2005, 12:29 AM
I have to admit, that's pretty funny, sorta, kinda... :crackup:


:noid:

I thought so too, then fool disappeared :think:

Zimfan
December 14th, 2005, 12:32 AM
:noid:
:granite::spam:

Redfin
December 14th, 2005, 12:48 AM
After reading this thread, I just noticed those Bratz dolls in the store today (for the first time).

They are kinda :Whipsnap: + :baby: :vomit:

SOTK
December 14th, 2005, 01:01 AM
Maybe someone could invent "Theonomy Bob" and he could execute Ken for his unrepentent homoness.

:chuckle:

firechyld
December 16th, 2005, 02:07 AM
on the radio yesterday, they were talking about the trend in grade-school age girls' underwear: thongs. Why in the world would a six year-old need a thong?

Either for comfort or to eliminate the whole visible panty line thing?

I can assure you that sex workers get more requests for display of visible panties than they do for g-strings.

As long as they aren't hanging out of their pants, where's the issue?

firechyld
December 16th, 2005, 02:27 AM
I went on a Toys R Us frolic yesterday. Saw some Bratz dolls. Saw some Barbies.

Saw two little girls begging their mother for spiderman action figures. It gave me a warm fuzzy feeling. :)

I know when I was a kid I could tell the difference between "stuff my dolls wear" and "stuff I wear".

SOTK
December 16th, 2005, 02:47 AM
I didn't play with Barbies! :Grizzly:

:chuckle:

firechyld
December 16th, 2005, 03:20 AM
I didn't play with Barbies! :Grizzly:

:chuckle:

All of my Barbies were dating. You'd think my mum would have figured something out from that...

SOTK
December 16th, 2005, 03:27 AM
:chuckle: