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Jacob
July 5th, 2017, 03:54 PM
Shalom.

God's name is

יהוה

This is, from right to left, in English, YHVH.

The Hebrew letters are in English Yod Hey Vav Hey.

Hebrew letters are not vowels.

The pronunciation of God's name in English is Yahveh. There are no vowels. However, God's name has been pronounced in Hebrew.

You will find vowel markings for the Hebrew letters elsewhere.

Shalom.

Jacob

KingdomRose
July 6th, 2017, 08:26 PM
Shalom.

God's name is

יהוה

This is, from right to left, in English, YHVH.

The Hebrew letters are in English Yod Hey Vav Hey.

Hebrew letters are not vowels.

The pronunciation of God's name in English is Yahveh. There are no vowels. However, God's name has been pronounced in Hebrew.

You will find vowel markings for the Hebrew letters elsewhere.

Shalom.

Jacob

Yes, Jacob, this is of utmost importance, yet the churches have down-played God's name to the point that most people don't even know what it is! Bible translators have even removed His name from their versions of the Bible. Imagine---removing the author's name from his own book!

genuineoriginal
July 7th, 2017, 12:56 PM
Shalom.

God's name is

יהוה

This is, from right to left, in English, YHVH.

The Hebrew letters are in English Yod Hey Vav Hey.

Hebrew letters are not vowels.

The pronunciation of God's name in English is Yahveh. There are no vowels. However, God's name has been pronounced in Hebrew.

You will find vowel markings for the Hebrew letters elsewhere.

Shalom.

Jacob
The Vav in Hebrew is often a vowel instead of a consonant.

There are several names in Hebrew that end in יהו, the first three letters of יהוה, such as אליהו, which is pronounced el-ee-ya-hoow, not el-ee-yav.

From this, it appears that יהוה should be pronounced as Yahoowh and not as Yahveh.

Jacob
July 7th, 2017, 01:27 PM
The Vav in Hebrew is often a vowel instead of a consonant.

There are several names in Hebrew that end in יהו, the first three letters of יהוה, such as אליהו, which is pronounced el-ee-ya-hoow, not el-ee-yav.

From this, it appears that יהוה should be pronounced as Yahoowh and not as Yahveh.
Shalom.

You are incorrect.

All of the Hebrew letters are consonants.

Shalom.

Jacob

genuineoriginal
July 7th, 2017, 05:42 PM
Shalom.

You are incorrect.

All of the Hebrew letters are consonants.

Shalom.

Jacob
All except for the Vav.

beameup
July 7th, 2017, 07:38 PM
All except for the Vav.
The "V" sound is of Ashkenazi origin. The original Hebrew was a "W", as in "waw".

Jacob
July 7th, 2017, 08:05 PM
All except for the Vav.

Shalom.

You are incorrect.

Shalom.

Jacob

CherubRam
July 7th, 2017, 10:38 PM
Shalom.

God's name is

יהוה

This is, from right to left, in English, YHVH.

The Hebrew letters are in English Yod Hey Vav Hey.

Hebrew letters are not vowels.

The pronunciation of God's name in English is Yahveh. There are no vowels. However, God's name has been pronounced in Hebrew.

You will find vowel markings for the Hebrew letters elsewhere.

Shalom.

Jacob

God's name is Yahwah.

The letter V ultimately comes from the Semitic letter Waw, as do the modern letters F, U, W, and Y. See F for details.
In Greek, the letter "upsilon" (Υ) was adapted from waw to represent, at first, the vowel /u/ as in "moon" and then later /y/, a rounded vowel similar to the German ).
In Latin, it was borrowed in early times as V (without the stem) to represent the same /u/ sound, as well as the consonantal /w/ (historically, Latin /w/ came from Proto-Indo-European /*gʷ/). Thus, num was pronounced "noom" and via was pronounced "wee-a." From the first century A.D. on, depending on Vulgar Latin dialect, consonantal /w/ developed into /b/, then later to /v/.

CherubRam
July 7th, 2017, 10:41 PM
Waw: Modern Hebrew uses this letter as a 'v' sound while Biblical Hebrew uses this letter as a 'w' sound.

Jacob
July 9th, 2017, 01:27 PM
God's name is Yahwah.

The letter V ultimately comes from the Semitic letter Waw, as do the modern letters F, U, W, and Y. See F for details.
In Greek, the letter "upsilon" (Υ) was adapted from waw to represent, at first, the vowel /u/ as in "moon" and then later /y/, a rounded vowel similar to the German ).
In Latin, it was borrowed in early times as V (without the stem) to represent the same /u/ sound, as well as the consonantal /w/ (historically, Latin /w/ came from Proto-Indo-European /*gʷ/). Thus, num was pronounced "noom" and via was pronounced "wee-a." From the first century A.D. on, depending on Vulgar Latin dialect, consonantal /w/ developed into /b/, then later to /v/.


Waw: Modern Hebrew uses this letter as a 'v' sound while Biblical Hebrew uses this letter as a 'w' sound.
Shalom.

You are incorrect.

Shalom.

Jacob

CherubRam
July 9th, 2017, 02:38 PM
Shalom.

You are incorrect.

Shalom.

Jacob

Lol. Have a nice day.

Jacob
July 9th, 2017, 02:43 PM
Lol. Have a nice day.Shalom.

Thank you. You too.

Shalom.

Jacob