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CherubRam
June 12th, 2015, 07:07 PM
Y’shua is Yahshua

Yahshuah, Yehoshua, Yahushua, Yeshua, Y'shua, Yahshua, Jeshua, Joshua. All of those are theophoric names.

Y’shua is Yahshua
After the return from Babylonian captivity the Jews began a practice of not speaking or writing God’s name, or His name in full. It is also known that the Galileans dropped their ayins, so as to not say God’s name. In a theophoric name even the letter yod can stand for the name Yah. Even today we use initial letters to represent a full name. Y’shua is Yahshua. The vowel between the first and last name does not belong, it is a sign for the person to say (Lord) instead of Yahwah or Yahshua.



Quote: HERIBERTO HABER: "Another example of retaining only one letter of the Tetragrammaton is the Hebrew name Yeshu [ישו],... This is a short form of Yeshua [ישוע] that is itself a short form of Yehoshua [יהושע]."

"Heriberto Haber was director at several Jewish schools in South America, and held the title "Professor en Letras at the University of Buenos Aires.""

He is the author of Fiestas y Tradiciones Judias, dealing with Jewish holidays. He made aliyah to Israel in 1971.

Vol. 29, No. 1, 2001"

Link to source: http://jbq.jewishbible.org/assets/Uploads/291/291_Names1.pdf


http://i796.photobucket.com/albums/yy248/CherubRam/Yahshua_zps211b2035.jpg (http://s796.photobucket.com/user/CherubRam/media/Yahshua_zps211b2035.jpg.html)

CherubRam
June 12th, 2015, 07:09 PM
By not pronouncing his name correctly this piece of scripture would go unnoticed.

Exodus 23:21
Pay attention to him and listen to what he says. Do not rebel against him; he will not forgive your rebellion, since my Name is in him.
Yah / wah and Yah / Shua

John 17:11
I will remain in the world no longer, but they are still in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them by the power of your name, the name you gave me, so that they may be one as we are one.
Yah / Shua

Yahwah reveals His name to Moses
Exodus 3:13-15.
13 And Moses said to Elohiym, “Suppose I go to the siblings of the Israelites and say to them, 'The Elohiym of your forefathers has sent me to you,' and they ask me, 'What is His name?' What shall I say to them?”
14 And Elohiym said to Moses, “The Living that Lives. This is what you are to say to the Israelites: 'The Living has sent me to you.”
15 And Elohiym also said to Moses, “Say to the Israelites, 'Yahwah, the Elohiym of your forefathers; the Elohiym of Abraham, the Elohiym of Isaac and the Elohiym of Jacob has sent me to you.' That’s my name forever, the name by which I’m to be remembered, from generation to generation.”

God's first name is Yah. Or if you prefer, the short form from Yahwah.
http://i796.photobucket.com/albums/yy248/CherubRam/YahCapture_zps37a99887.jpg (http://s796.photobucket.com/user/CherubRam/media/YahCapture_zps37a99887.jpg.html)



Psalm 102:8
All day long my enemies taunt me; those who rail against me use my name as a curse. everyone who is called by my name, whom I created for my glory, whom I formed and made.”
Question: What people are called by Yahwah?

Jeremiah 23:27
They think the dreams they tell one another will make my people forget my name, just as their ancestors forgot my name through Baal worship.
Question: Who is it that believes God's name is beyond knowing?

Acts 15:17
that the rest of mankind may seek (the Lord / Yahwah), even all the Gentiles who bear my name, says (the Lord / Yahwah), who does these things’—
Again: What people are called by God?


Quote from: http://www.adath-shalom.ca/history_of_hebrew2a.htm

Semitic Vowels and their Actualization
"Common Semitic or Proto-Semitic has three short vowels (§ 10.5): low/open back velar a, high/close front palatal i, and high/close back velar u with strongly rounded lips. It also possesses the three corresponding long vowels ā, ī, ū. Although additional vocalic phonemes have arisen in various Semitic languages, there are no sufficient grounds to suppose that other vowels belong to the original core of the Semitic phonemic system.... However, the realization of the Semitic vowels a, i, u in actual speech can produce other vocalic sounds, mainly in the case of short vowels (cf. §10.11). There is a widespread tendency in Semitic to pronounce high and low vowels, especially when they are unstressed, as mid vowels e, ә, o.... Thus short i and u tend to become ә, as in Ethiopic (§21.30), and the same can happen with a.... Besides, i can easily become e by lowering the tongue, u becomes then o. The lack of appropriate vocalic signs, especially for ә and o, does often not allow determining the presence of these vowels in an accurate way, and "e" will then stand for ә and "u" for o (§21.3). On the other side, a stressed short vowel tends to become long, and its articulation may at the same time be lowered (e.g. i > ī > ē) or raised (e.g. a > ā > ō) . Some of these new vowels may acquire a phonemic status in a determined language."
Quoted from Lipinski 1997 §21.1.

Early Aramaic and Hebrew vowels
The early Aramaic and Hebrew vowel system is reconstructed as: a o i u

Summary
The following charts summarize the most common reflexes of the Proto-Semitic vowels in the various stages of Hebrew:
Proto-Semitic: a, i, u.
Proto-Hebrew: a, o, i, u.
Secunda: a, o, i, u.
Tiberian: ɔ, o, i, u.
Babylonian: ɔ, o, i, u.
Palestinian: a, o, i, u.
Samaritan: ( a, ɒ,) u, ( e, i,) (o, u.)

The vowel “a” is pronounced, “ah.” The “u” is pronounced “ow or uw.” And the Ayin (a) is pronounced “ah.”

CherubRam
June 12th, 2015, 07:11 PM
Yahshua: ישוע


The English name Joshua is from the Hebrew language "(Yehoshua / Yahshua)", meaning, Yah’s Helper. As an interpretation it could also mean, God’s Salvation or Life Saver.
Note: It is the opinion of some scholars that too many vowels are added to the Hebrew language.
Note: Investigations of Qumranic and Mishnaic Hebrew (ca. 50 B.C.E.-200 C.E.) indicate that post biblical Hebrew phonology was different than that of biblical Hebrew.


Imperial Aramaic Old Aramaic Biblical Aramaic or Hebrew

The term, “Imperial Aramaic” refers to a historic variety of Aramaic, as spoken and written during the period roughly from 600 BCE to 200 CE. The Imperial Aramaic form which changed the least is now used for writing the Hebrew language. By the third century CE, variant forms of the script had diverged into distinct scripts such as Syriac, Nabataean, and Palmyran.
Europeanization of Hebrew
Most likely the “e” vowel became part of Hebrew between 300 AD to 600AD.
Hebrew was revived by Jewish people thinking and speaking in modern European languages.
Note on Mishnaic Hebrew
The earliest Rabbinic literature dates from the period 70-200 CE and it is written in a spoken Hebrew of the time, often called, after the most famous literary product of the time, Mishnaic Hebrew. Mishnaic Hebrew is very different from Biblical Hebrew.

Phonemes are normally conceived of as abstractions of discrete segmental speech sounds of vowels and consonants. The e sound may or may not have been produced in any ancient language. There is no facts to back it up. It is a presumption that the e sound would have been (possibly) produced in the language from the main (actual vowels) and consonants.

Quoted from Lipinski 1997 "Although additional vocalic phonemes have arisen in various Semitic languages, there are no sufficient grounds to suppose that other vowels belong to the original core of the Semitic phonemic system..."

There is no doubt that there was an e sound. The e sound in Hebrew did not become a vowel until after the second century AD. The WAH in Hebrew has an ae sound, so that could have lead to the biblical Hebrew spelling Yahw/e/h. My point is that before biblical Hebrew the vowel would have been "a," as shown to you.

Jahovah: Notice the a vowels in that spelling.



Theos means Deus in Latin, and in English it means god.

God
Ancient Hebrew: IL.
Aramaic: IL.
Hebrew: EL.
English: God.
Spanish: Dios.
Italian: Iddio, Dio.
German: Gutes, Gott.
Germanic, Old French: Gott.
French: Dieux, Dieu.
Greek: Theo, Theos.
Latin: Deus.
Norwegian: Gud.
Swedish: Gud.
Portugese: Deus.

See the change in Hebrew where the letter "I" becomes an "E."



§7. The Vowels in General, Vowel Letters and Vowel Signs.

7a 1. The original vowels in Hebrew, as in the other Semitic tongues, are, a, i, u. E and o always arise from an obscuring or contraction of these three pure sounds, viz. ĕ by modification from ĭ or ă; short ŏ from ŭ; ê by contraction from ai (properly ay); and ô sometimes by modification (obscuring) from â, sometimes by contraction from au (properly aw).

As an example of the original consonant being retained, we might also include the י‎ of the constr. state plur. masc. if its ê (according to §89d) is contracted from an original ay. Against this, however, it may be urged that the Phoenician inscriptions do not usually express this ê, nor any other final vowel.[6]

7e (b) The employment of ו‎ to denote ô, û, and of י‎ to denote ê, î, may have resulted from those cases in which a ו‎ with a preceding a was contracted into au and further to ô, or with a preceding u coalesced into û, and where י‎with a has been contracted into ai and further to ê, or with a preceding i into î (cf. § 24). In this case the previously existing consonants were retained as vowel letters and were further applied at the end of the word to denote the respective long vowels. Finally א‎ also will in the first instance have established itself as a vowel letter only where a consonantal א‎ with a preceding a had coalesced into â or ā.

Source: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Gesenius%27_Hebrew_Grammar/7._The_Vowels_in_General,_Vowel_Letters_and_Vowel_ Signs

Isaiah 52:6
Therefore my people will know my name; therefore in that day they will know that it is I who foretold it. Yes, it is I.”
Yahwah foretold it.

Proverbs 30:4
Who has gone up to heaven and come down? Whose hands have gathered up the wind? Who has wrapped up the waters in a cloak? Who has established all the ends of the earth? What is his name, and what is the name of his son? Surely you know!
Yahshua is Yahwah's son.

John 10
36 what about the one whom the Father set apart as his very own and sent into the world? Why then do you accuse me of blasphemy because I said, ‘I am God’s Son’?
Yahshua said he is a god.

I do not hold to the tradition of Jews and Christians deforming or mispronouncing God's name. It has been a long standing tradition for Jews and Christians to mislead people in knowing God's name.

CherubRam
January 16th, 2016, 04:07 AM
Vatican forbids use of "Yahweh"

Keywords: Names Of God, Tetragrammaton, Yahweh, Conceptions Of God, Lord, Shema Yisrael, Names Of God In Judaism, Religion / Belief

BY STAFF REPORTER
THE VATICAN has forbidden the use of the tetragrammaton YHWH (usually pronounced "Yahweh") to refer to God in the liturgy.
The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments issued a directive which said that the word "Lord" should be used instead.
The instruction was signed by Cardinal Francis Arinze, prefect of the congregation, and Archbishop Albert Malcolm Ranjith, secretary of the congregation. on August 8.
It said: "In liturgical celebrations, in songs and prayers the name of God in the form of the tetragrammaton YHWH is neither to be used or pronounced."

It also said that the word should not be used in modem translations of the Bible. Translations should follow the 2001 Vatican instruction Liturgiarn authenticam and replace "YHWH" with equivalent terms to Adonai (Hebrew) or Kyrios (Greek) such as "Lord", "Signore", "Seigneur", "Herr" and "Senor".
Fr Tim Finigan of Our Lady of the Rosary, Blackfen, Kent welcomed the letter, saying that it achieved a number of things.
He wrote that "there is an important now on New Testament Christology pointing out that the attribution of the title "Lord" to Christ is a proclamation of His divinity" and that the new directive removed "needless offence to Jewish sensibilities". Judaism forbids speaking out the name "Yahweh".

CherubRam
January 16th, 2016, 04:11 AM
The Hebrew spelling Y(ah)shua (ישוע) appears in some later books of the Hebrew Bible. The vowel "a" between the yod and shin is pronounced "ah." Modern Hebrew has that vowel as "e." It is an established fact that ( ישוע ) is a theophoric name. Ya is the short form for Yah. That is the reason for the English spelling Yahshua, adding the two letters a and h, to pronounce as it was in Christ day. Yeshua is almost universally recognized in the academic world as being the original Hebrew name for the Messiah, but that is from a modern Hebrew prospective. “Yahshua” is not a recognized Hebrew word; it is not listed in any Hebrew dictionary or lexicon. It is not recognized as being a legitimate name by any Hebrew scholar or linguist. It is believe by some that the reason for this may be: Quote.
Wikipedia References
Dictionary of Jewish usage: A guide to the use of Jewish terms - Page 39 Sol Steinmetz - 2005 - 207 pages - Preview A.\M,yimach shemo vezichro!. plural, yimach shemom (vezich- rom). (Literally) 'May his name and memory be blotted out!' Used after an individual's name, as in Haman yimach shemo! zichrono livrocho, plural, zichronom livrocho.
Chaim Bermant The walled garden: the saga of Jewish family life and tradition - 1974 "The darkest curse in the Hebrew language is yemach shemo vezichro, 'may his name and remembrance be obliterated"
Lawrence Schimel Found tribe - 2002 "The worst curse in Hebrew is "Yemach shemo!" May his name be erased!"

The best evidence is that his proper name was "y'shua". But because the Galileans often dropped their 'ayins', hence "y'shu," for which in the talmud many Jewish people use as an acronym meaning “may his name be blotted out”. The letters in "YSHU" stood for the sentence, "Yemach Shmo u'Zikro" meaning "may his name be blotted out" (from the scroll of life). According to a Jewish proverb, the worst death is eternal anonymity.

For uncertain reasons there are Christians and Jews who do not want God's name or Christ name used.
Exodus 23:21
Pay attention to him and listen to what he says. Do not rebel against him; he will not forgive your rebellion, since my Name is in him.

Yah / wah
Yah / shua

genuineoriginal
January 16th, 2016, 09:52 AM
The Name of God is יהוה

This is a word formed from the Hebrew prefix י (He will) combined with the Hebrew root word הוה (be).

The pronunciation of the combined word is yəhawvah

So, Yehovah is a closer pronounciation than Yahweh

CherubRam
January 16th, 2016, 10:03 AM
The Name of God is יהוה

This is a word formed from the Hebrew prefix י (He will) combined with the Hebrew root word הוה (be).

The pronunciation of the combined word is yəhawvah

So, Yehovah is a closer pronounciation than Yahweh

Yahuah or Yahwah means "Life Began."

Isaiah 43:10
“You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “and my servant whom I have chosen, so that you may know and believe me and understand that I am he. Before me no god was formed, nor will there be one after me.

http://i796.photobucket.com/albums/yy248/CherubRam/YahCapture_zps37a99887.jpg (http://s796.photobucket.com/user/CherubRam/media/YahCapture_zps37a99887.jpg.html)

genuineoriginal
January 16th, 2016, 10:11 AM
Yahuah or Yahwah means "Life Began."

Isaiah 43:10
“You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “and my servant whom I have chosen, so that you may know and believe me and understand that I am he. Before me no god was formed, nor will there be one after me.

http://i796.photobucket.com/albums/yy248/CherubRam/YahCapture_zps37a99887.jpg (http://s796.photobucket.com/user/CherubRam/media/YahCapture_zps37a99887.jpg.html)

You have the pronunciation wrong, but your chart proves that הוה means "be".

Now you just need to realize that Hebrew has prefixes and the prefix י means "he will".

The combined word יהוה translates in English to "He will be".

It is an affirmation by God that He exists by His will alone.

keypurr
January 16th, 2016, 12:34 PM
Very informative, thank you friend.

CherubRam
January 16th, 2016, 12:35 PM
You have the pronunciation wrong, but your chart proves that הוה means "be".

Now you just need to realize that Hebrew has prefixes and the prefix י means "he will".

The combined word יהוה translates in English to "He will be".

It is an affirmation by God that He exists by His will alone.

The number of letters in the Hebrew alphabet, their order, their names, and their phonetic values are virtually identical to those of the Aramaic alphabet, as both Hebrews and Arameans borrowed the Phoenician alphabet for their uses during the end of the 2nd millennium BC.
The modern script used for writing Hebrew (usually called the Jewish script by scholars, and also traditionally known as the square script, block script, or Assyrian script; not to be confused with the Eastern variant of the Syriac alphabet) evolved during the 3rd century BC from the Aramaic script, which was used by Jews for writing Hebrew since the 6th century BC. Prior to that, Hebrew was written using the old Hebrew script, which evolved from the 10th century BC Phoenician script.

The original pictograph used in the Early Semitic script is a Y shape, a picture of a tent peg. The tent pegs were made of wood and may have been Y-shaped to prevent the rope from slipping off.

The Modern Hebrew name for this letter is “vav”, a word meaning “peg” or “hook”. This letter is used in Modern Hebrew as a consonant with a “v” sound and as a vowel. If the Modern Hebrew letter appears as (וֹ), it is the vowel sound “ow” and if it appears as (וּ), it is the vowel sound “uw”. When used as a vowel the ancient pronunciation was also an “ow” or “uw”. In each consonant, vowel letters of the Ancient Hebrew language the pronunciation of the consonant is closely related to the pronunciation of the vowel such as the letter “hey” is “h” and “eh,” and the pronunciation of the letter “yud” is “y” and “iy”. For this reason, it is probable that the original pronunciation of the letter Y was with a “w”. In Modern and Ancient Arabic language, this letter is also pronounced with a “w”. Therefore, the original name of this letter would have been “waw” instead of “vav”. Vav is a Germanic influence upon the Hebrew language, perhaps from the beginning of the second century AD.

In regards to the consonant “W” in the name YHWH

Wāw serves several functions in the Arabic language. Perhaps foremost among them is that it is the primary conjunction in Arabic, equivalent to "and"; it is usually prefixed to other conjunctions, such as ولكن wa-lakin, meaning "but". Another function is the "oath", by preceding a noun of great significantly valued by the speaker. It is often literally translatable to "By..." or "I swear to...", and is often used in the Qur'an in this way, and also in the generally fixed construction والله wallah ("By Allah!" or "I swear to God!").

Bright Raven
January 16th, 2016, 12:47 PM
Very informative, thank you friend.

Now interpret it properly.

CherubRam
February 20th, 2016, 08:07 PM
I am pleased to announce, that after twenty years, the name of Yahwah and Yahshua are established all over the Internet. When I first began, those names and spellings where unheard of. I did not know that there was a group called "Sacred Name Movement," or "Holy Namers;" whom used the name of God, spelled; Yahwah. Anyway, I did not see any effort on their part to establish His name, or the name Yahshua.

There are still many who are resistant to those names, who do not know what they are talking about. As with all languages, spellings and grammar rules changed. And so it is also with the ancient Hebrew. Over the many years the Rabbi's changed the Hebrew language, especially to deform God's name, and the Messiah's.

I am now working on establishing the fact that Jews and Muslims do not have a covenant with God.

Jews and Muslims have no covenant with God: http://www.theologyonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=116378

CherubRam
February 20th, 2016, 08:15 PM
Theophoric names with "Yeho" prefixes have corresponding forms where the letters "eh"' have been omitted. There is a theory by Christian Ginsburg that this is due to Hebrew scribes omitting the "h", changing Jeho (יְהוֹ) into Jo (יוֹ), to make the start of "Yeho-" names not sound like an attempt to pronounce the Divine Name. With the Tetragrammaton, some theophoric names begin with the first two consonants, other names take only the first and the third letters from the Tetragrammaton and build them into the syllable "yo" at the beginning of a name (Yoab, Yoram, Yoyakim, Yoel, Yonathan).

CherubRam
June 2nd, 2016, 08:00 PM
Bump.